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2024 | June

New Colorado tax credit could lift 50,000 children out of poverty, is latest to tap TABOR surplus
Loveland Reporter-Herald, June 1, 2024
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EDITORIAL: TABOR can’t stop the socialist drift
Denver Gazette, June 2, 2024
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Perspective: A blueprint for better schools
Denver Gazette, June 2, 2024
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New Colorado tax credit could lift 50,000 children out of poverty, is latest to tap TABOR surplus
Greeley Tribune, June 1, 2024
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New Colorado tax credit could lift 50,000 children out of poverty, is latest to tap TABOR surplus
Lamar Ledger, June 1, 2024
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Colorado Springs Needs More Housing
Southern Colorado Business Forum & Digest, June 3, 2024
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2024 | May

Four key takeaways from Colorado’s “breakthrough” legislative session
The Denver Post, May 15, 2024
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Gov. Polis signs cuts to income, sales and property taxes into law as ballot fight looms
The Denver Post, May 15, 2024
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Voters likely to overrule legislative fix to address property tax spike, head of Denver chamber warns
The Denver Post, May 14, 2024
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Kelly Caufield on the Mandy Connell Show
The Center Square, May 14, 2024
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Gov. Polis signs bill easing local rules for ‘mother-in-law flats’ in Colorado
The Center Square, May 13, 2024
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Property tax relief battle in Colorado moves to the ballot
Axios, May 13, 2024
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Kelly Caufield Joins The Ross Kaminsky Show
850KOA, May 13, 2024
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DJ Summers on KOA Morning News
850KOA, May 9, 2024
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In Colorado, Elevated Crime Rates Dampen the Rocky Mountain High
US News, May 9, 2024
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World War II veteran Charles Burrell honored with affordable housing development in Five Points
The Denver Gazette, May 9, 2024
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CSI’s DJ Summers talks about the new Colorado property tax relief proposal
KOA, May 9, 2024
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Colorado lawmakers pass property tax bill in last hours of session
The Center Square, May 8, 2024
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Town hall: Regional leaders delve into Denver’s illegal immigration crisis
Colorado Politics, May 8, 2024
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Housing Affordability Worsens
The Greeley Tribune, May 5, 2024
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Minding Colorado’s Water
The Denver Gazette, May 5, 2024
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Builders finally making a dent in Colorado’s housing shortfall. It’s not helping buyers or renters.
The Denver Post, May 4, 2024
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Report criticizes scope of analysis in Colorado bill on single-payer insurance
The Center Square, May 2, 2024
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Compromise legislation in Colorado appeases energy industry, environmentalists
Kiowa County Press, May 1, 2024
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2024 | April

Police cuts no “material impact” to public safety, Denver finance department says
The Denver Gazette, April 25, 2024
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Denver councilmembers defend budget cuts, as city struggles to find money for immigration crisis
Colorado Politics, April 23, 2024
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Denver councilmembers defend budget cuts, as city struggles to find money for immigration crisis
The Denver Gazette, April 22, 2024
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The most unsafe city in Northern CO
K99, April 19, 2024
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Denver bars, music venues host listening parties for Taylor Swift’s newest album
Denver 7, April 19, 2024
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Is Fort Collins More Safe than the Rest of Colorado?
K99, April 17, 2024
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‘We all fall down:’ RTD’s first-ever homeless outreach manager makes his rounds
Rocky Mountain PBS, April 16, 2024
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Opinion: Colorado Democrats have launched an all-out assault on the oil and gas industry this year
The Denver Gazette, April 14, 2024
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Common Sense Institute’s Cole Anderson discusses Denver’s Inflation Numbers
850KOA, April 11, 2024
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Prices of the Rocky Tickets
Denver 7, April 5, 2024
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Opinion: Colorado Democrats have launched an all-out assault on the oil and gas industry this year
The Denver Post, April 4, 2024
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DJ Summers on the Free Lunch Program
850KOA, April 4, 2024
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As Home Values Spike, Rocky Mountain States Face ‘Property Tax Mess’
New York Times, April 3, 2024
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WATCH: Proponents, critics clash over legislation aimed at increasing Colorado condo construction
Colorado Politics, April 2, 2024
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Denver’s downtown blooms will be less bountiful this year
KDVR Fox 31, April 1, 2024
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Denver parks face flowerbed cuts as city tackles illegal immigration crisis
Denver Gazette, April 1, 2024
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2024 | March

Colorado Legislators Reject Bill to Ban Oil and Gas Drilling, Protecting State’s Economy and Jobs
The Lobby, March 31, 2024
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PERSPECTIVE: Preparing Coloradans for the jobs of the future
Colorado Springs Gazette, March 31, 2024
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Colorado lawmakers reject bill to ban oil and gas drilling by 2030
Denver Gazette, March 29, 2024
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EDITORIAL: Restoring condos to Colorado’s housing equation
Colorado Springs Gazette, March 25, 2024
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LETTERS: Threatening the oil and gas industry; another 2C tax increase
Denver Gazette, March 25, 2024
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Bills to reform Colorado’s construction defects law advance in Legislature
Kiowa County Press, March 24, 2024
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Bills to reform Colorado’s construction defects law advance in Legislature
Colorado Newsline,  March 23, 2024
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Opinion: To the benefit of billboard attorneys, Colorado lawmakers rely on civil suits to enforce more laws
Denver Post, March 22, 2024
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Bill aimed at increasing Colorado condo construction moves to Senate
Colorado Politics, March 21, 2024
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Bill to end Colorado oil, gas permitting could have $2B impact on tax revenue: Report
Colorado Springs Gazette, March 21, 2024
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Stopping Oil Drilling Would Be An Economic Catastrophe
Real Clear Energy, March 20, 2024
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Banning Oil & Gas
PetroNerds, March 20, 2024
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Leaving Foster Care is a Fraught Time for Young Adults
Colorado Collective, March 20, 2024
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Study: Colorado ban on oil and gas drilling will take a toll on education, destroy jobs, cut GDP
Colorado Politics, March 19, 2024
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The Decline of Condominium Construction in Colorado
Mile High CRE, March 19, 2024
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Swiftonomics: How Taylor Swift is boosting the US economy by billions
MSN, March 19, 2024
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Colorado bill to ban oil and gas drilling could devastate state’s economy
Oklahoma Energy, March 18, 2024
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A city on a ‘knife’s edge’: Businesses decry drug use along Denver’s south Broadway
Denver Gazette, March 18, 2024
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Study: Colorado ban on oil and gas drilling will take a toll on education, destroy jobs, cut GDP
Denver Gazette, March 17, 2024
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Report: Bill to End Colorado Oil, Gas Permitting Could Have $2B Impact on Tax Revenue
Climate Realism, March 17, 2024
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EDITORIAL: Oil & gas ban would cripple Colorado
Colorado Springs Gazette, March 17, 2024
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What to Know About Denver’s Migrant Crisis
Prowers Journal, March 14, 2024
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Report: Bill to end Colorado oil, gas permitting could have $2B impact on tax revenue
The Center Square, March 14, 2024
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Bill to end Colorado oil, gas permitting could have $2B impact on tax revenue: Report
Washington Examiner, March 14, 2024
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Bill to end Colorado oil, gas permitting could have $2B impact on tax revenue: Report
Colorado Politics, March 14, 2024
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DJ Summers on the Colorado Sun Migrant Panel – story
Colorado Sun, March 13, 2024
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Six important things to know about the migrant crisis
Colorado Sun, March 13, 2024
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Mira: The Colorado Sun discute la crisis migratoria de Denver               
Commerce City Sentinel Express, March 13, 2024
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Why Colorado had higher unemployment rates but more job growth in 2023 than the Feds reported
Colorado Sun, March 12, 2024
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As Colorado’s labor force participation falls, private-sector jobs increase
The Black Chronicle, March 12, 2024
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As Colorado’s labor force participation falls, private-sector jobs increase
The Center Square, March 12, 2024
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As Colorado’s labor force participation falls, private-sector jobs increase
710 KNUS, March 12, 2024
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CO’s affordable housing crisis has spread from the mountains to the Front Range
Canon City Record, March 11, 2024
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CO’s affordable housing crisis has spread from the mountains to the Front Range
Longmont Daily Times Call, March 11, 2024
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DJ Summers on Trey Gowdy’s Sunday in America
Fox National , March 11, 2024
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Colorado’s affordable housing crisis has spread from the mountains to the Front Range
Boulder Daily Camera, March 11, 2024
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Perspective: The cost of juvenile crime
Denver Gazette, March 10, 2024
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Colorado’s affordable housing crisis has spread from the mountains to the Front Range
Denver Post, March 10, 2024
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Colorado’s affordable housing crisis has spread from the mountains to the Front Range
Lamar Ledger, March 10, 2024
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Colorado’s affordable housing crisis has spread from the mountains to the Front Range
Longmont Daily Times Call, March 10, 2024
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Youth crime rates in Colorado have dropped, but study shows spike in violent crimes
Denver Gazette, March 7, 2024
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Denver mayor points finger at Trump, GOP as locals criticize ‘crazy’ handling of migrant crisis
Fox National, March 7, 2024
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Denver mayor points finger on ‘crazy’ handling of migrants
WCCS Radio, March 7, 2024
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Mandy Connell spotlights CSI’s Juvenile Crime study
850KOA, March 7, 2024
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Denver household incomes need to be $71K higher than 2020 to afford a home
Denver Gazette, March 7, 2024
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Colorado’s Education Leaders Tackle Skill Gap: Free Event on Workforce Alignment
BNN, March 6, 2024
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Colorado lawmakers begin work on ‘construction defects’
9News (KUSA), March 6, 2024
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Youth crime rates in Colorado have dropped, but study shows spike in violent crimes
Colorado Politics, March 6, 2024
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Youth crime rates in Colorado have dropped, but study shows spike in violent crimes
Colorado Springs Gazette, March 6, 2024
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Colorado lawmakers weigh rules to spur more building without stripping homeowner protections
Fort Morgan Times, March 5, 2024
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Colorado children committing fewer, more violent crimes: report
KDVR Fox 31, March 5, 2024
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Colorado lawmakers begin work on ‘construction defects’ in efforts to jumpstart condo development
Colorado Politics, March 5, 2024
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Colorado legislature debate condo construction legislation
KDVR Fox 31, March 5, 2024
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Colorado children committing fewer, more violent crimes: report
Yahoo Finance, March 5, 2024
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Colorado lawmakers weigh rules to spur more building without stripping homeowner protections
Denver Post: March 4, 2024
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Colorado lawmakers weigh rules to spur more building without stripping homeowner protections
Greeley Tribune: March 4, 2024
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Colorado lawmakers weigh rules to spur more building without stripping homeowner protections
Longmont Daily Times Call: March 4, 2024
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Colorado lawmakers weigh rules to spur more building without stripping homeowner protections
Loveland Reporter-Herald: March 4, 2024
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Free transportation creates immigrant ‘pull factor’ to Denver
Denver Gazette: March 4, 2024
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GUEST COLUMN: Three ways Colorado’s Legislature can address crime
Colorado Springs Gazette: March 3, 2024
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GUEST COLUMN: Three ways Colorado’s Legislature can address crime
Denver Gazette: March 1, 2024
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Colorado’s economic competitiveness improved, report finds
Denver Gazette: March 1, 2024
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New Pikes Peak Housing Network hopes to tackle Colorado Springs’ housing woes
Colorado Springs Gazette: March 1, 2024
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How much money you need to make to own a home in Denver
KOSI 101: March 1, 2024
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Denver among top 10 most expensive places for homebuyers
KDVR Fox 31: March 1, 2024
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2024 | February

Zillow: Homebuyers need $173K a year to afford a home in Denver
Yahoo News: February 29, 2024
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Aurora City Council Backs Away From Migrant Support After Denver Budget Cuts
Westword: February 29, 2024
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Colorado ranks favorably for economic competitiveness, poorly for migration
Washington Examiner: February 28, 2024
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JA Roundtable on Workforce
Chalkbeat: February 27, 2024
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Jefferson County Man Arrested for allegedly killing roommate
Newsbreak: February 27, 2024
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Sandiaga Uno Targets Taylor Swift Concert in Indonesia for ‘Swiftnomics’ Boost
Jakarta Globe: February 22, 2024
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Colorado ranks favorably for economic competitiveness, poorly for migration
The Center Square: February 22, 2024
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Study: Where Coloradans moved to in 2023
MSN: February 19, 2024
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Business News (Ben Murrey)
Denver Gazette: February 18, 2024
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Illegal border crossings plummeted in January
Las Vegas Sun: February 16, 2024
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Jason Gaulden on 850 KOA
850 KOA: February 15, 2024
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Inflation in metro Denver took a big drop at end of 2023
Denver Post: February 14, 2024
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Are you in the right occupational field in Colorado? Tool offers insights into future workforce gaps
Colorado Politics: February 13, 2024
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Sanctuary city mayors bemoan blocked border bailout 
Washington Examiner: February 13, 2024
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Denver inflation rate at 3.5% over the last year
The Center Square: February 13, 2024
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Denver inflation rate at 3.5% over the last year
Prime Publishers: February 13, 2024
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Big Burden of Migrant Influx Strains Denver
New York Times: February 12, 2024
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Rodeo – A Cash Cow for Local Economies
Sports Illustrated: February 6, 2024
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Possible solutions to Colorado’s property tax problem
West Slope Now: February 6, 2024
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Colorado Homeowners Face Steep Property Tax Hike Despite Legislative Efforts
BNN: February 6, 2024
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Possible solutions to Colorado’s property tax problem
KREX (CBS): February 6, 2024
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Colorado’s Population Rising at Only a Fraction of Its Former Glory
North Forty News: February 2, 2024
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Colorado’s population is still growing but much slower than previous years
KXRM (FOX 21): February 2, 2024
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Analysis projects Colorado’s slower population growth will affect workforce
The Center Square: February 2, 2024
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You now have to work nearly triple to afford a home
West Slope Now: February 1, 2024
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You now have to work nearly triple to afford a home
KDVR Fox 31: February 1, 2024
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Colorado’s population is still growing, but much slower than previous years
KDVR Fox 31: February 1, 2024
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Study shows Colorado has fewer new residents
Yahoo News: February 1, 2024
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2024 | January

Where, and Why Colorado’s local governments succeed
Colorado Politics: January 30, 2024
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Can Colorado Avoid the Rising Male Unemployment Rates Across the US?
Colorado Biz Magazine: January 30, 2024
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Research shows Colorado at the bottom of the housing affordability ranking
Washington Examiner: January 29, 2024
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Kelly Brough
Denver Gazette: January 29, 2024
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Research shows Colorado at bottom of housing affordability ranking
Denver Gazette: January 29, 2024
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Colorado has fallen behind in economic growth
Denver Gazette: January 28, 2024
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Polis has been all talk on tax cuts
Denver Gazette: January 28, 2024
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Research shows Colorado at bottom of the housing affordability ranking
The Black Chronicle: January 27, 2024
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Special Session sold taxpayers short
Greeley Tribune: January 27, 2024
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Does Colorado care about its men who have dropped out of the workforce?
Colorado Politics: January 26, 2024
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Research shows Colorado at bottom of the housing affordability ranking
The Center Square: January 26, 2024
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Kelly Brough named CSI fellow
The Colorado Sun: January 26, 2024
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Denver suburb ranks high among large U.S. cities where it’s easier for Gen Zers to own homes, study says
Denver Post: January 26, 2024
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DJ on Property Tax increase
KDVR Fox 31: January 25, 2024
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Tamra Ryan on the Ross Kaminsky Show
The Ross Kaminsky Show: January 25, 2024
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As the 2024 legislative session begins, housing will permeate every discussion
Sum & Substance: January 24, 2024
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Kelly Brough joins Common Sense Institute
Denver Business Journal: January 24, 2024
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DJ Summers discusses the December Jobs Report
850 KOA: January 24, 2024
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Construction defects law needs tweaks to function as intended
Grand Junction Sentinel: January 23, 2024
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Kelly Brough Joins CSI as Urban Development Fellow
9News (KUSA): January 23, 2024
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Coloradans could pay 25% more in property taxes despite new law
The Black Chronicle: January 23, 2024
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Property Taxes May Increase 25%
Denver Gazette: January 23, 2024
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Special session sold taxpayers short
Colorado Politics: January 23, 2024
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Colorado property taxes may increase 25%
Colorado Politics: January 22, 2024
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Report: Coloradans could pay 25% more in property taxes despite new law
The Center Square: January 22, 2024
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Colorado property taxes may increase 25%
9News (KUSA): January 22, 2024
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National Western Stock Show hits top 10 in attendance and 2nd highest livestock sales in history
Denver Gazette: January 22, 2024
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Study finds Colorado property tax on the rise
KDVR Fox 31: January 21, 2024
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Property Taxes could rise 26%
Denver Gazette: January 21, 2024
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Editorial: Special Session Sold Taxpayers Short
Colorado Springs Gazette: January 21, 2024
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Colorado Based Common Sense Institute Announces Expansion
The Colorado Sun: January 19, 2024
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Current Taylor Swift Net Worth 2024 (Billionaire?)
New Trader U: January 18, 2024
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What does 2024 hold for growth in Fort Collins? Housing is top of mind
KUNC: January 18, 2024
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Lawmakers need a lawsuit diet
Vail Daily: January 18, 2024
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Lawmakers need a lawsuit diet
Haxtun Fleming Herald: January 18, 2024
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How Denver met a goal to shelter 1,000 people
Christian Science Monitor: January 17, 2024
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With Denver at a breaking point from illegal immigration, mayor heads to DC to plead for action
Denver Gazette: January 15, 2024
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Denver spending on migrants could reach $500 per household
Colorado Springs Gazette: January 15, 2024
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Film to show challenges of foster care
Longmont Leader: January 15, 2024
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Report: Denver spending on migrants could equal $500 per household
Washington Examiner: January 15, 2024
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Legislators Need a Lawsuit Diet
Kiowa County Press: January 15, 2024
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National Western Stock Show Targets Record Attendance Amid Major Redevelopment
BNN: January 14, 2024
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Affordability by the numbers
Grand Junction Sentinel: January 14, 2024
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Legislators Need a Lawsuit Diet
Sterling Journal Advocate: January 14, 2024
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Middle Housing is affordable housing
Denver Gazette: January 14, 2024
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Denver spending on migrants could equal $500 per household
The Black Chronicle: January 13, 2024
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Free Enterprise Report – Rick Wagner Podcast
The Rick Wagner Show: January 13, 2024
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Spending on migrants could equal $500 per household
710 KNUS: January 12, 2024
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State of the Cities
Denver Business Journal: January 12, 2024
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Report: Denver spending on migrants could equal $500 per household
The Center Square: January 12, 2024
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CSI report: Denver’s $180M migrant sheltering projection
Yahoo News: January 12, 2024
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Did Taylor Swift’s Eras Tour Improve the Economy Wherever She Played?
Holy Cross Magazine: January 12, 2024
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118th National Western Stock Show kicks off amid ongoing makeover of historic stomping grounds
Greeley Tribune: January 12, 2024
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Capitol Review: Legislators need a lawsuit diet
Fort Morgan Times: January 11, 2024
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What $180 million in illegal immigration cost means for Denver households and agencies
Denver Gazette: January 11, 2024
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As the 2024 legislative session begins, housing will permeate every discussion
Sum & Substance: January 11, 2024
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The chosen few: Judging and selecting winners at the National Western Stock Show
Denver Gazette: January 11, 2024
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You’re Invited: Rebecoming Me
Villager: January 11, 2024
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Capitol Review: Legislators need a lawsuit diet
Craig Daily Press: January 11, 2024
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Colorado Needs An Economic Turnaround – Kristi Pollard Op-ed
Colorado Politics: January 11, 2024
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Common Sense Institute study casts doubt on Denver’s $180M migrant aid projection
KDVR Fox 31 : January 11, 2024
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Economic Vitality for all Coloradans
Colorado Politics: January 10, 2024
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Curbing litigation is key to affordable housing
Greeley Tribune: January 10, 2024
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Housing takes center stage anew as lawmakers prepare to convene for new session
Colorado Politics: January 9, 2024
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Curbing litigation is key to affordable housing
Colorado Politics: January 9, 2024
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Housing takes center stage anew as lawmakers prepare to convene for new session
Denver Gazette: January 9, 2024
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118th National Western Stock Show kicks off amid ongoing makeover of historic stomping grounds
Fort Morgan Times: January 8, 2024
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‘It’s our Grand Slam’: The National Western Stock Show finally arrives in Denver
Denver Gazette: January 7, 2024
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118th National Western Stock Show kicks off amid ongoing makeover of historic stomping grounds
Greeley Tribune: January 7, 2024
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118th edition of the National Western
Sterling Journal Advocate: January 6, 2024
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Housing takes center stage anew as lawmakers prepare to convene for new session
Colorado Politics: January 6, 2024
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J.J. Ament on the Jimmy Sengenberger Show
710 KNUS: January 6, 2024
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118th National Western Stock Show kicks off amid ongoing makeover of historic stomping grounds
The Denver Post: January 6, 2024
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Sean Duffy – Polis to skirt true state of Colorado economy in State of State speech
Colorado Politics: January 5, 2024
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Colorado’s health care sector faces regulatory, financial strains, study says
Colorado Politics: January 5, 2024
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Healthcare is cornerstone for state’s job landscape, but study finds economic challenges persist
Colorado Politics: January 5, 2024
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Colorado homeowners worried about legislation on construction defects
Denver 7 (KMGH): January 5, 2024
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National Western Stock Show parade takes over downtown Denver
Denver Gazette: January 5, 2024
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Polis to skirt true state of Colorado economy in State of State speech
Colorado Politics : January 5, 2024
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Hearing hoofbeats: The Annual Western Stock Show is coming. And it’s set to bring over 700,000 visitors to Denver
Denver Gazette: January 4, 2024
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Denver returns to “Cow Town” status as dozens of Longhorns kick off National Western Stock Show Parade
CBS4 (KCNC): January 4, 2024
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Freezing weather creates possible issues for incoming ranchers
Denver Gazette: January 4, 2024
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Common Sense Institute Chairman Among Wealthy Conservatives Backing Heidi Ganahl’s Plan to Retake Colorado
Colorado Times Recorder: January 3, 2024
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Reimagine rather than patch CO’s property tax system
Colorado Real Estate Journal: January 3, 2024
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Legislators need a lawsuit diet
Colorado Politics: January 3, 2024
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Taylor Swift batte (anche) il record di Elvis Presley
Vanity Fair: January 2, 2024
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From Deion to Taylor, These Were Among the 7 Biggest Economic Drivers in Colorado in 2023
5280 Magazine: January 2, 2024
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2023 Review
Colorado Times Recorder: January 1, 2024
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Colorado River crisis looms over state’s landscape decisions
Grand Junction Sentinel: January 1, 2024
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2023 | December

Hang on to your hats, the National Western Stock Show is Back
Denverite: December 29, 2023
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Free Enterprise Summit
The Villager: December 28, 2023
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J.J. Ament on 850 KOA – National Western Stock Show
850 KOA News: December 26, 2023
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Loveland Housing
Loveland Reporter-Herald: December 23, 2023
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The Unaffiliate – Davia, Property Taxes
Colorado Sun: December 22, 2023
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Heartwarming tales and hometown heroes
The Keystone: December 21, 2023
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Here come the bulls
Denver Gazette: December 21, 2023
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Colorado forecast: State economy likely to reach soft landing in 2024
Denver Business Journal: December 20, 2023
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It’s Quizmas
City AM: December 20, 2023
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LTE – Housing
Loveland Reporter-Herald: December 19, 2023
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Balancing Net Zero and Keeping the Lights On
Colorado Biz Magazine: December 18, 2023
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Colorado ranks high in many categories in national homelessness report
The Center Square: December 18, 2023
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Editorial: Colorado Employers in the Crosshairs Again
Denver Gazette: December 17, 2023
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Inflation update: Denver prices up but rising slower
Colorado Sun: December 16, 2023
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A Swift Conspiracy
Northern Express: December 16, 2023
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Sean Duffy column in COPO
Colorado Politics: December 15, 2023
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Colorado’s competitive edge slips in key areas, new report says
Colorado Politics : December 13, 2023
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Lang Sias on the George Brauchler Show
710 KNUS: December 13, 2023
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2023 (Taylor’s Version): 13 Ways Taylor Swift Staked Her Claim This Year As The Monarch Of All Media
Deadline: December 13, 2023
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Metro Denver inflation rates aided by falling gas prices
Focus Horizon News: December 13, 2023
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Report: Colorado’s economic competitiveness negatively influenced by housing market
The Black Chronicle: December 13, 2023
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Child Welfare System can be fixed
MFFF: December 13, 2023
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Inflation down slightly
The Center Square: December 13, 2023
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Colorado Ski Towns Have A Huge Housing Crisis On Their Hands
Powder: December 13, 2023
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Falling gasoline prices put a dent in Denver area inflation
The Denver Post: December 13, 2023
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Colorado inflation pains are easing, but continue to outpace national rate
Axios Denver: December 13, 2023
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Editorial: A Less Competitive Colorado
Denver Gazette: December 13, 2023
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Common Sense Institute Celebrates its Free Enterprise Summit
The Colorado Sun: December 12, 2023
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Colorado inflation pains are easing, but continue to outpace national rate
Axios Denver: December 12, 2023
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Colorado think tank ranks state last in the nation for ‘housing competitiveness’
Denver Business Journal: December 12, 2023
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Colorado’s competitive edge slips, new report says
The Denver Gazette: December 12, 2023
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Colorado ranks dead last for housing competitiveness: report
KDVR Fox 31: December 12, 2023
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The Mandy Connell Show – Guy Benson is a funny guy
850 KOA: December 11, 2023
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콜로라도 주, 범죄율 증가로 인접 주들 앞질러…전국 범죄율 4위
Colorado Times: December 11 2023
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The Affordability Paradox
Grand Junction Sentinel: December 10, 2023
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Denver approves $14.3M to combat homelessness
Washington Examiner: December 9, 2023
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Editorial: Denver needs more condos
Denver Post: December 7, 2023
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Denver approves $14.3 million to combat homelessness
The Center Square: December 7, 2023
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Taylor Swift makes history as TIME’s person of the year
CBC: December 6, 2023
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The Ross Kaminsky Show – Kelly Caufield
850 KOA: December 5, 2023
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Construction litigation blocking condo development in Colorado
Greeley Tribune: December 4, 2023
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Deloitte’s Christmas Quiz
Reaction: December 4, 2023
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Construction litigation blocking condo development in Colorado, but how does it get unblocked?
Denver Post: December 3, 2023
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Denver Mayor & Senate Dem Leader Join Groups at Right-Wing Conference
Colorado Times Recorder: December 1, 2023
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2023 | November

Denver couple’s adoption finalized a few months before teenager graduates from high school
Denver 7 (KMGH): November 30, 2023
Watch>>

Taylor Swift: cette grande première pour sa tournée The Eras Tour!
MCE: November 26, 2023
Read>>

Perspective: Compassion is not enough
Denver Gazette: November 26, 2023
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Taylor Swift é eleita Artista do Ano pela revista Billboard
POP Noticas: November 21, 2023
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Foster care costs Colorado thousands
KGNU: November 20, 2023
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Study says high school graduation key to success for foster youth
Colorado Politics: November 19, 2023
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Employment performance declines slightly in Colorado last month
Kiowa County Press: November 18, 2023
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Taylor Swift entre dans la cour des grands en devenant milliardaire!
MCE TV: November 16, 2023
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High School Graduation is Key
Denver Gazette: November 15, 2023
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News Mashup
Young MInds Advocacy: November 15, 2023
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In Colorado, foster care is a big concern for the more than 200 young people who age out of the system each year
The Lobby: November 15, 2023
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It costs Colorado $343,453 per kid who ages out of foster care, according to new research
Colorado Sun: November 15, 2023
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Colorado’s rising crime rate ranks 4th in the nation
Grand Junction Sentinel: November 13, 2023
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Common Sense Institute’s DJ Summers talks about the crime rates in Colorado
850 KOA News: November 13, 2023
Listen>>

87 victims in 94 days: Denver suffered summer of gun violence
Denver Gazette: November 13, 2023
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Colorado’s rising crime rate ranks 4th in the nation
Denver Gazette: November 13, 2023
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Taylor Swifts världsturné – en mångmiljardsuccé
Expressen: November 12, 2023
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High Cost of Colorado
The Colorado Sun: November 12, 2023
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콜로라도 주, 범죄율 증가로 인접 주들 앞질러…전국 범죄율 4위
Colorado Times: November 12, 2023
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How could higher property taxes affect Colorado
KDVR Fox 31: November 10, 2023
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Report: Impact of Colorado property taxes next year will be $1,406 per household
Grand Junction Sentinel: November 10, 2023
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Antrieb für US-Wirtschaft: Diesen Einfluss hat Taylor Swift auf den Aktienmarkt
Finanzen.net: November 10, 2023
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Fiebre Swiftie: ¿qué pasó con la venta de vuelos Santiago – Buenos Aires por el concierto de Taylor Swift?
DF Sud: November 10, 2023
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High Cost of Colorado: The Sun introduces a new series
The Colorado Sun: November 10, 2023
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Report: Colorado outpaces neighboring states’ crime rates
KDVR Fox 31: November 10, 2023
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$1,406 less per Colorado household: Higher property taxes would hammer economy, analysis says
Denver Post: November 10, 2023
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Report: Impact of Colorado property taxes next year will be $1,406 per household
The Center Square: November 10, 2023
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Conservatives Beat Back Democrats’ Misleading Money Grab In Colorado
Conservative Daily: November 10, 2023
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Arrogance of cloistered Dems yields Colorado conservative wins | DUFFY
Colorado Politics: November 10, 2023
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How could higher property tax payments affect Colorado’s economy?
KDVR Fox 31: November 10, 2023
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Conservatives Beat Back Democrats’ Misleading Money Grab In Colorado
The Federalist: November 10, 2023
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Colorado’s education reality is a return to mediocrity
Colorado Politics: November 10, 2023
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Former Phoenix journalist wins coveted Taylor Swift reporting gig
Phoenix New Times: November 9, 2023
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Denver to sweep 3rd encampment for mayor’s House1000 initiative
KDVR Fox 31: November 9, 2023
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Non, Taylor Swift n’est pas la sauveuse de la croissance américaine
Pour l’Eco: November 9, 2023
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Coloradans Turn Down a Tax Grab
Wall Street Journal: November 9, 2023
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Coloradans saw Proposition HH for the con it was | OPINION
Colorado Politics: November 8, 2023
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Colorado election 2023: A Proposition HH guide for last-minute voters
Douglas County News: November 7, 2023
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Colorado Proposition II wins big, adding more funding for universal preschool
Fort Collins Coloradoan: November 7, 2023
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Long-Term School Funding Threatened if Proposition HH Is Defeated
Colorado Times Recorder: November 7, 2023
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Colorado election 2023: A Proposition HH guide for last-minute voters
Colorado Community News: November 7, 2023
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Several Armed Robberies Monday Night in Colorado Springs
Newsbreak: November 7, 2023
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Denver building owners face potentially millions in fines for failing to comply with energy requirements
Denver Gazette: November 7, 2023
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Proposition HH: Colorado voters reject property tax relief plan
Washington Examiner: November 7, 2023
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Common Sense Institute’s Kelly Caufield on economic impact of Colo Prop HH
850 KOA News: November 6, 2023
Listen>>

No such thing as a free lunch
Grand Junction Sentinel: November 6, 2023
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2023 미국에서 가장 안전한 주
Korea Daily: November 6, 2023
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Cosa è la Taylor Swift Economy, meglio conosciuta come Swiftonomics
Investire.biz: November 5, 2023
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Taylor Swifts världsturné – en mångmiljardsuccé
Expressen: November 4, 2023
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Is the She-Cession Over? Not for Many Women in the Workplace
Colorado Biz Magazine: November 3, 2023
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Proposition HH: How the property tax measure would affect school funding
Longmont Leader: November 2, 2023
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“The Taylor Effect”: Vancouver and BC set to cash in on Taylor Swift concerts
Daily Hive: November 2, 2023
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ENDORSEMENTS: It’s time to turn in those last-minute ballots
Denver Gazette: November 1, 2023
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2023 | October

EDITORIAL: Let’s defeat HH — then really cut property taxes
Denver Gazette: October 31, 2023
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Proposition HH: How the property tax measure would affect school funding
Chalkbeat: October 30, 2023
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Amid migrant increase, newcomers and Coloradans adapt
Christian Science Monitor: October 30, 2023
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Sins of omission in Laffer’s Prop HH perspective
Colorado Politics: October 30, 2023
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PERSPECTIVE: Little to show for more school spending
Colorado Springs Gazette: October 29, 2023
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Monday Letters: Prop HH, gun reform, health curriculum, RFSD elections
Glenwood Springs Independent: October 29, 2023
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Metro Denver to reach $2 billion spent on homelessness over 3 years, study shows
Denver Gazette: October 29, 2023
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Taylor Swift est dans son ère milliardaire, selon Bloomberg
News24.fr: October 27, 2023
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Report puts $2B price tag on spending to combat homelessness in Denver
Grand Junction Sentinel: October 27, 2023
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Taylor Swift is in her billionaire era, according to Bloomberg
Global News: October 27, 2023
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Colorado’s homeless — heal, don’t enable
Colorado Politics: October 27, 2023
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Construction-defects reform efforts will return in 2024
Sum & Substance: October 25, 2023
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Llegada del frío y presupuesto agotado complican situación de inmigrantes en Denver
Yahoo Noticias: October 25, 2023
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Alleged Denver Auto Theft Ring Indicted on 121 Counts
Autobody News: October 25, 2023
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You could attract thieves if these types of stickers are on your car
KDVR Fox 31: October 24, 2023
Watch>>

Alleged auto theft ring indicted on 121 counts
Grand Junction Sentinel: October 24, 2023
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Parents must be empowered to choose schooling
Colorado Springs Gazette: October 24, 2023
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Watch: Prop HH debate hosted by The Denver Gazette and 9NEWS
9News (KUSA): October 23, 2023
Watch>>

Study: Colorado one of the least safe states in US
KDVR Fox 31: October 23, 2023
Watch>>

Proposition HH debate features property taxes, TABOR refunds and dueling predictions of the future
Greeley Tribune: October 23, 2023
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High interest rates contributing to chronic housing shortage
Colorado Springs Gazette: October 22, 2023
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With less than 3 weeks away from elections, voters still undecided on Prop HH
KKTV 11 News: October 21, 2023
Watch>>

HH could prop up education funding
Aspen Daily News: October 19, 2023
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Common Sense Institute: Take politics out of Colorado’s energy policy
Denver Gazette: October 19, 2023
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GUEST COLUMN: Prop. HH lowers the boom on TABOR refunds
Denver Gazette: October 18, 2023
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Rate of violent crime increased last year in Colorado, FBI data shows
The Center Square: October 17, 2023
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Proposition HH: Lower property tax rates, smaller TABOR refunds, maybe more money for schools?
CPR News: October 17, 2023
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Proposition HH fundraising narrows with three weeks to go before Election Day
Colorado Politics: October 17, 2023
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Following the money on Denver’s homeless
Denver Gazette: October 17, 2023
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EDITORIAL: Throwing money at Colorado’s K-12
Denver Gazette: October 17, 2023
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Report: Colorado schools could get billions from Prop HH, but funds would lack guardrails
The Lion (Herzog Foundation): October 16, 2023
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Fort Collins Crime Rate Down as Colorado Crime Rate Declines
Fort Collins Coloradoan: October 15, 2023
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San Luis Valley officials create regional board to vet water export projects
The Colorado Sun: October 15, 2023
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EDITORIAL: Following the money on Denver’s homeless
Denver Gazette: October 15, 2023
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What’s Working: Didn’t know Colorado is a leader in clean energy and quantum? A Tech Hub designation could change that.
The Colorado Sun: October 14, 2023
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El flechazo de Taylor y Travis ya ha Ganado la Super Bowl
La Voz de Galicia: October 14, 2023
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The figures behind a release by Silvestre Dangond that doesn’t ‘Ta’Malo’…
Miredvista: October 14, 2023
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Report: Colorado schools could get billions from Prop HH, but funds would lack guardrails
Grand Junction Sentinel: October 13, 2023
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Denver area residents continue to pay a premium when it comes to inflation
The Denver Post: October 13, 2023
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Report: Colorado schools could get billions from Prop HH, but funds would lack guardrails
The Center Square: October 13, 2023
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Taylor Swift Economic Impact
The Washington Post: October 13, 2023
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Taylor Swift May Earn $4.1 Billion From Her Eras Tour
Robb Report: October 13, 2023
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Colorado’s 5.3% inflation rate outpaces national average of 3.7%
Grand Junction Sentinel: October 12, 2023
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Swiftonomics: Taylor Swift y su impacto en la economía
Shock: October 12, 2023
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EDITORIAL: ‘NO’ on Prop. HH — 10 reasons why
Denver Gazette: October 11, 2023
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Proposition HH is about way more than just property taxes
Sky Hi News: October 11, 2023
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Amid Reports of Nearly $3 Million Loss, Here’s How $740-Million-Worth Taylor Swift Seamlessly Exceeded NASCAR’s Influence
Essentially Sports: October 10, 2023
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San Luis Valley officials create regional board to vet water export projects
The Colorado Sun: October 9, 2023
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Prop HH and its effect on commercial property taxes leaves business groups torn
Sum & Substance: October 9, 2023
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EDITORIAL: A Few More Thoughts About Prop HH
Pagosa Daily Post: October 6, 2023
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Crime is down in Fort Collins despite statewide uptick over last 15 years, new report says
Fort Collins Coloradoan: October 6, 2023
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Rampant theft needs justice, not vengeance
Denver Gazette: October 5, 2023
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Housing: Home sales, lack of starter homes, financial help
Denver 7 (KMGH): October 4, 2023
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Colorado Springs sees crime decline as it rises in Denver
Denver Gazette: October 4, 2023
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New condos are hard to find in Colorado. Getting developers to build more will roil the Capitol next year.
The Colorado Sun: October 2, 2023
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Colorado property taxes ‘expect heavy increase’ despite tax relief referendum, analysis says
Denver Gazette: October 1, 2023
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2023 | September

Opinion: The bill for Proposition HH will be prodigious
The Colorado Sun: September 29, 2023
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(Opinion) Other Voices: Colorado’s small biz turns thumbs down on HH
Greeley Tribune: September 29, 2023
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Colorado’s Declining Condo Construction Contributing to Housing Shortage
Kool 107.9: September 26, 2023
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Peter LiFari at the Common Sense Institute on the Housing Shortage
850 KOA News: September 26, 2023
Listen>>

Op-Ed: Proposition HH is wolf in sheep’s clothing for Colorado TABOR
The Center Square: September 26, 2023
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Declining housing construction in Colorado is part of the housing crisis
Real Property: September 26, 2023
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EDITORIAL: Colorado’s small biz turns thumbs down on HH
Denver Gazette: September 26, 2023
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EDITORIAL: Laws for low-end lawyers harm our economy
Denver Gazette: September 25, 2023
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GUEST COLUMN: Don’t be fooled — vote ‘no’ on Prop HH
Denver Gazette: September 24, 2023
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Campaigns accelerate to influence Colorado voters on Prop HH
The Center Square: September 25, 2023
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Colorado renters will be ‘biggest losers’ if Prop HH Passes
Mix 104.3: September 22, 2023
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Declining housing construction in Colorado is part of the housing crisis
Real Property: September 22, 2023
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Editorial: Fix Colorado law, build more condos
Denver Gazette: September 22, 2023
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Report: Colorado’s declining condo construction contributing to housing shortage
The Center Square: September 21, 2023
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Why are TABOR refunds so huge lately? And will they stay that way?
CPR News: September 21, 2023
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Report: Colorado’s declining condo construction contributing to housing shortage
Grand Junction Sentinel: September 21, 2023
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Taylor Swift Brings Tourism, Boosts Economy, And Bolsters Food Relief Across America
Hollywood.com: September 21, 2023
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Common Sense Institute’s Kelly Caufield on Colo Jobs and Labor Force Update
850 KOA News: September 20, 2023
Listen>>

The Business of Sports: Uniting Colorado
Colorado Biz Magazine: September 20, 2023
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Understanding the Ballot: The Facts About Fort Collins’ Biggest Issues
Fort Collins Area Chamber of Commerce: September 20, 2023
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Colorado ranks among the worst states for affordability
KOOL – 107.9 FM: September 17, 2023
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Report: Recent Colorado Regulations Increase Taxes, Fees by $2B
KOOL – 107.9 FM: September 17, 2023
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PERSPECTIVE: Undercutting Colorado’s job creators
Denver Gazette: September 17, 2023
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Analysis says Colorado renters will be ‘biggest losers’ if Prop HH passes
KNUS/Spot on CO: September 15, 2023
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Governor Polis speaks on affordable housing
Western Slope Now: September 16, 2023
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Analysis says Colorado renters will be ‘biggest losers’ if Prop HH passes
The Center Square: September 15, 2023
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 Wanted: Taylor Swift and Beyonce journalists at America’s largest newspaper chain – National
Good Word News: September 14, 2023
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Recherchés : Taylor Swift et Beyoncé journalistes de la plus grande chaîne de journaux américaine – National
Nouvelles-Doujour: September 13, 2023
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Report: Recent Colorado regulations increase taxes, fees by $2B
The Center Square: September 13, 2023
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Colorado’s Back Door Tax Hike
Wall Street Journal: September 13, 2023
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Armstrong: Colorado public schools failing black and Hispanic kids
Complete Colorado Page 2: September 12, 2023
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Grand Junction closes park considered ‘center of the homeless community’
CPR News: September 12, 2023
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Frontier Freedom Podcast featuring Chris Brown discussing Prop HH
Centennial Institute: September 12, 2023
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CO regulations increase taxes and fees by $2 Billion
Grand Junction Sentinel: September 12, 2023
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Buena Vista’s Affordable Housing Challenges Intertwined with Looming Water Shortage
Off Property Exchange: September 12, 2023
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How do Colorado towns grow when they have limited water for new homes?
Colorado Sun: September 12, 2023
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Colorado Tries to Sneak One Under the TABOR
Real Clear Markets: September 12, 2023
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Economic Mobility and the Women’s Bean Project featuring Tamra Ryan
Colorado Business Roundtable: September 12, 2023
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Growth of 2.4% in the second quarter (thanks to the tour)
OICanadian: September 11, 2023
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As Colorado Springs grows, 20-somethings are the fastest growing cohort
Colorado Springs Gazette: September 9, 2023
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How do celebrities impact the global economy?
Radio W Mexico: September 8, 2023
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El Paso County population expected to grow to 1 million by 2050
KOAA NBC5: September 7, 2023
Watch>>

Column: Middle-class Coloradans struggle with housing costs too
Denver Gazette: September 7, 2023
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‘Homebuyer misery index’ reveals grim reality in Colorado
Denver Gazette: September 7, 2023
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Proposition HH Will Reduce Property Taxes but Let the State Keep More Revenue Than TABOR Rules Would Have Allowed
The Villager: September 7, 2023
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How to Prevent Your Catalytic Converter From Being Stolen At the airport
Forbes: September 7, 2023
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Report: Colorado No. 2 in U.S. for the largest decrease in affordability
Denver 7: September 6, 2023
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Fort Collins Chamber to release ballot guide
Fort Collins Chamber News: September 6, 2023
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CSI’s Kelly Caufield – Let’s Get Nerdy on Property Taxes
850 KOA: September 5, 2023
Listen>>

Housing in-depth: Home sales, Rent prices & where affordability decreasing the most
Denver 7: September 5, 2023
Watch>>

Adaptive Reuse Survey IDs 22 Denver Commercial Buildings That Could Become Housing
Biznow: September 5, 2023
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Who run the economy? Girls.
Quinnipiac Chronicle: September 5, 2023
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What’s Working: Older Coloradans are returning to work, and inflation may be to blame
Colorado Sun: September 3, 2023
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(Opinion) A crossroads for workers with disabilities
Greeley Tribune: September 2, 2023
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Grandes shows podem impulsionar a inflação?
DW: September 2, 2023
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Report ranks CO among the worst for housing affordability
Grand Junction Sentinel: September 1, 2023
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Taylor Swift’s new Eras tour film is the latest lesson in ‘Swift-onomics’
Knowledia: September 1, 2023
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The end of Swift, Beyoncé and Barbie season will hurt the US economy
D1SoftballNews: September 1, 2023
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Taylor Swift y Beyoncé: ¿salvavidas o azote económico?
Economia Global: September 1, 2023
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2023 | August

Taylor Swift’s new Eras tour film is the latest lesson in ‘Swift-onomics’
CBC: August 31, 2023
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Property Tax Calculator
Twitter/KOA 850 AM & 94.1 FM: August 30, 2023
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Taylor Swift, ‘Barbie’ and Beyoncé are credited for summer’s billion-dollar pop culture boom. Experts weigh in on their massive successes.
Yahoo News: August 28, 2023
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Aurora’s plan to build affordable housing will net Prop. 123 funds
Denver Gazette: August 28, 2023
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Prop HH-11:30
RMPBS: August 25, 2023
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Kelly Caufield talks Prop HH
WGIR: August 22, 2023
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The Ross Kaminsky Show – Kelly Caufield talks about Prop HH and CSI’s latest study
850 KOA: August 22, 2023
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Prop HH to remain on the November ballot after Colorado Supreme Court Ruling
Conservative Daily: August 22, 2023
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Polis: Property Taxes Good for Schools
Colorado Politics: August 22, 2023
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Prop HH to remain on November ballot after Colorado Supreme Court ruling
Washington Examiner: August 22, 2023
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Prop HH to remain on November ballot after Colorado Supreme Court ruling
The Center Square: August 21, 2023
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L’estate in cui Barbie, Beyoncé e Taylor Swift hanno rivoluzionato l’economia
Start Magazine: August 20, 2023
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Colorado puts money on the table to build a roof over the home construction industry
The Denver Post: August 20, 2023
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CO has 190,000 job openings and 95,000 people unemployed – a disconnect?
Colorado Sun: August 19, 2023
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Colorado only adds 800 jobs
The Greeley Tribune: August 19, 2023
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We need to build more, not tax more
Durango Herald: August 18, 2023
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Colorado only adds 800 jobs in July, but unemployment stays low
Fort Morgan Times: August 18, 2023
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Government job growth lifts Colorado’s July employment as hospitality declines
Grand Junction Sentinel: August 18, 2023
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Colorado only adds 800 jobs in July, but unemployment stays low
The Greeley Tribune: August 18, 2023
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La gira global ‘The Eras Tour’ de Taylor Swift ya compite con las grandes ligas del pop
La gira global: August 18, 2023
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Santa Clara is renaming itself–and making Taylor Swift honorary mayor–for concert weekend
The Sacramento Bee: August 18, 2023
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Colorado only adds 800 jobs in July, but unemployment stays low
Colorado’s private sector lost 1,900 jobs in July after losing 400 in June, marking the first back-to-back job losses in a year, wrote Cole Anderson, a research analyst at the Common Sense Institute, in an email.”
Denver Post: August 18, 2023
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Government job growth lifts Colorado’s July employment as hospitality declines
“Colorado’s leisure and hospitality sector lost 3,500 jobs last month, “the largest single-month loss since December 2020,” an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute said. The sector added 89,500 jobs between January 2021 and July and its employment grew 2.38% since January 2020.”
The Center Square: August 18, 2023
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Colorado only adds 800 jobs in July, but unemployment stays low
Colorado’s private sector lost 1,900 jobs in July after losing 400 in June, marking the first back-to-back job losses in a year, wrote Cole Anderson, a research analyst at the Common Sense Institute, in an email.”
Fort Morgan Times: August 18, 2023
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Proposition HH to cost each taxpayer $5K in TABOR refunds over a decade
Colorado Politics: August 17, 2023
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Proposition HH to cost each taxpayer $5K in TABOR refunds over a decade, study says
“The study from the Common Sense Institute comes on the heels of a poll from Magellan Strategies that said the more voters know about the property tax measure, the less they like it.”
The Denver Gazette: August 17, 2023
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Report: CO taxpayers could lose $512 annually under Prop HH
Grand Junction Sentinel: August 16, 2023
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Report: Colorado taxpayers could lose $512 annually in TABOR refunds if Prop HH passes
“The Common Sense Institute, a free enterprise research group, published a 45-page evaluation of the long-term impacts of the initiative. The organization said the item “is one of the most complicated ballot measures ever presented to voters.”
The Center Square: August 16, 2023
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Inflation pains persist in Denver — with restaurant price inflation the highest in the nation
“Between May and July, household energy and utility prices jumped by 7.5%, marking the largest two-month increase in over a year, according to a new report from the conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute.”
Axios: August 18, 2023
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Colorado puts money on the table to build a roof over the home construction industry
“Back in 2021, the Common Sense Institute estimated the state was only adding just more than half of the 54,190 new units it needed to average per year over the next five years to fill the existing shortfall and keep up with population gains.”
Greeley Tribune
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Colorado puts money on the table to build a roof over the home construction industry
“Back in 2021, the Common Sense Institute estimated the state was only adding just more than half of the 54,190 new units it needed to average per year over the next five years to fill the existing shortfall and keep up with population gains.”
The Denver Post: August 11, 2023
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Denver inflation rate up 4.7% in last year
“The Common Sense Institute, a free enterprise think tank, noted in an analysis of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data that Denver’s rate is down from 5.15%. 
The Daily Sentinel: August 10, 2023
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COLUMN: ‘Truth in sentencing’ initiative is common sense | George Brauchler
“Given Colorado’s ranking as fourth-worst in America for recidivism — and the finding in the Common Sense Institute’s most recent “Cost of Crime” report that crime has a $27 billion economic impact on Colorado — this citizen-led initiative is not just common sense, it is jillions of cents.”
The Gazette: August 7, 2023
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PERSPECTIVE: Denver reboots on homelessness
“A landmark study by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute in 2021 concluded that nearly half a billion dollars a year was being spent annually on homeless services in combined public and private funding in metro Denver. As the institute’s report noted, that’s $41,613 to $104,038 per homeless person in Denver based on homeless population estimates that have ranged anywhere from around 4,000 to over 10,000.”
The Gazette: August 6, 2023
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Taylor Swift Is In Her Paying Out $55M In Bonuses Era
“A July Common Sense Institute report focusing on Swift’s impact on Colorado estimated that the two shows from the Eras Tour that month could add $140 million to the state’s GDP for the year.”
Vanity Fair: August 2, 2023 by Kase Wickman
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The cost of crime on Colorado’s economy hits Montezuma County
“According to research published July 13 by the nonpartisan research organization Common Sense Institute, Montezuma County residents fall into the upper range of adults who individually pay for crime costs.”
Cortez Journal: August 1, 2023
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Worst-run cities in America
“Denver has a mayor and a 13-member City Council, with 11 members representing geographic districts and two elected citywide. Denver is among the top 10 large U.S. cities with high crime rates, according to the Common Sense Institute, a free-market policy analysis group based in Colorado. The city ranked the third-highest in auto theft, the sixth-highest for property crimes, and the 10th-highest for rape.”
LiHerald.com: August 1, 2023
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2023 | July

As influx of people from Latin America continues, Colorado leaders want more migrants in temporary jobs
“That’s part of why inflation is so high. It also has Colorado missing out on $46 billion in GDP this year, according to the Common Sense Institute, a Colorado-based think thank that conducts research examining the impacts of policies, initiatives, and proposed laws on Coloradans.”
Denver 7: July 31, 2023
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As influx of people from Latin America continues, Colorado leaders want more migrants in temporary jobs
“It also has Colorado missing out on $46 billion in GDP this year, according to the Common Sense Institute, a Colorado-based think thank that conducts research examining the impacts of policies, initiatives, and proposed laws on Coloradans.”
Denver 7: July 31, 2023
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Così Taylor Swift spinge il Pil Usa: balzo del 2,4% nel secondo trimestre (grazie al tour)
“Il tour da 137 concerti in 5 continenti è infatti un volano per il Pil Usa. «L’intero tour statunitense di Taylor Swift potrebbe generare una spesa totale di 4,6 miliardi di dollari, superiore al Pil di 35 Paesi», ha dichiarato il centro di ricerca Common Sense Institute. Si pensi solo agli hotel, ai ristoranti e ai voli interni.”
L’Economia: July 27, 2023
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Don’t let labor shortage hobble Colorado | GUEST COLUMN
“A recent study from Common Sense Institute found the labor force shortage and skills mismatch in Colorado is costing $46 billion in additional annual GDP.”
The Gazette: July 27, 2023
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‘Tourflation?’ Here’s how Beyoncé, Taylor Swift tours could be boosting your local economy
“A report from the Common Sense Institute in Colorado found that the concerts in Denver could generate $140 million for the state’s gross domestic product (the value of the goods and services produced) and lead to consumers spending more than $200 million. Swift performed almost two weeks ago but we don’t have new numbers yet.”
The Scaramento Bee: July 27, 2023
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What all this Taylor Swift-bashing says about us | John Moore
“A think tank called Common Sense Institute came out with a report claiming that Swift’s Denver shows contributed up to $140 million to Colorado’s GDP. An unknowable number of concertgoers traveled to Denver for the show, and it was evident all around Mile High Stadium that money being spent on food, transportation, hotel rooms and countless other taxable goodies were tangibly benefiting businesses in the immediate vicinity.”
The Denver Gazette: July 26, 2023
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Denver Mayor Johnston clarifies plan surrounding homelessness emergency declaration
“A 2022 Point in Time Count shows about 1,300 people live on the streets of Denver each night. Over the past five years, Denver’s unhoused population increased by 44%, according to the Common Sense Institute.”
Yahoo News: July 25, 2023
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Denver Mayor Mike Johnston provides more details on plan to address homelessness
“Over the past five years, Denver’s unhoused population increased by 44%, according to the Common Sense Institute.”
Denver 7: July 25, 2023 by Brandon Richard, Katie Parkins
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Denver Mayor Mike Johnston declares homelessness emergency on his first day in office
“The Common Sense Institute reports that the city spent $516 million on homelessness last year.”
KUNC July 25, 2023 by Lucas Brady Woods
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Taylor Swift and The Swifties Are Pumping the Economy
“The Common Sense Institute estimates Taylor Swift’s tour could generate $4.6 billion in consumer spending. For context, Bosnia, Senegal, and the Bahamas have roughly $5 billion in GDP.”
Real Investment Advice: July 25, 2023 by Michael Lobowitz and Lance Roberts
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What all this Swift-bashing says about us
“A think tank called Common Sense Institute came out with a report claiming that Swift’s Denver shows contributed up to $140 million to Colorado’s GDP.”
The Denver Gazzette: July 22, 2023 by John Moore
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Colorado hiring holding a recession at bay, for now
The Denver Post: July 22, 2023 by Aldo Svaldi
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Report: Shortage of workers, skilled labor costing Colorado $46B in GDP
“‘A substantial portion of the unemployed and marginally attached to the labor force are people with barriers to employment, such as disabilities, past incarceration, lack of childcare, and educational attainment challenges,’ Tamra Ryan, the Common Sense Institute’s Coors Economic Mobility fellow, wrote in the report.”
The Center Square: July 21, 2023 by Joe Mueller
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La gira de Taylor Swift podría generar más dinero que el PIB de 35 países
“‘La totalidad de la gira estadounidense de Taylor Swift podría generar 4.600 millones de dólares en gastos totales de los consumidores, más que el PIB de 35 países’, añaden desde el Common Sense Institute.”
20minutos: July 21, 2023 by A. Rondan
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Santa Clara is renaming itself — and making Taylor Swift honorary mayor — for concert weekend
“The Eras Tour could generate $4.6 billion in consumer spending by the end of the tour, which is more than the GDP of 35 countries, according to Colorado research organization the Common Sense Institute, although the exact numbers are difficult to confirm because of the unknown ways locals might have spent their money that weekend were they not at the concert.”
The Sacramento Bee: July 21, 2023 by Sonora Slater
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The Impact of Taylor Swift on Local Economies across the US
“At the current rate, the “Eras Tour” U.S. tour could generate $4.6 billion in total consumer spending, larger than the GDP of 35 countries, according to an analysis by the Common Sense Institute — a think tank based in Colorado.”
Swift Telecast: July 21, 2023 by Craig Fedirighi
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Mayor Johnston not pausing homeless sweeps, despite confusion at community meeting
“March data provided from the Common Sense Institute showed Denver’s homeless population was 4,794 people in 2022 and 3,752 in 2021, which was slightly down from 4,171 people in 2020.”
Denver 7: July 20, 2023 by Jeff Anastasio
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Taylor Swift boosting local economies across the US
“Out west, Denver saw a surge in economic activity, with Swifties dropping an estimated $200 million in direct spending over two shows, according to the Common Sense Institute.”
News Nation: July 20, 2023 by Kaleigh Beeson, Laura Meehan
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The Eras Tour | Global economies rely on Taylor Swift to stave off recession
“The cities through which the tour will pass are trembling with emotion after knowing some figures: according to estimates by the Common Sense Institute, each concert generates 140 million dollars that go directly to the GDP of the State and fans spend more than $200 million in direct consumption.”
Euro ES Euro: July 19, 2023
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New study from CSI shows crime costing Colorado billions
“A new study from the Common Sense Institute shows the billions of dollars crime is costing Colorado.”
WSAZ News Channel 3: July 14, 2023
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Dampak Ekonomi Konser Taylor Swift: Bantu AS Tekan Resesi?
“Pada akhir pekan lalu, Eras Tour Taylor Swift mencapai Kota Denver, Colorado. Common Sense Institute memperkirakan, konser itu bisa menghasilkan US$140 juta terhadap PDB negara bagian.”
Fortune Indonesia: July 19, 2023 by Tanayastri Dini Isna KH
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The Taylor Swift Effect: How the PA Native’s ‘Eras’ Tour Is Powering Local Economies Across the US
“Swift played two sold-out shows in Denver last weekend. A report from the Common Sense Institute estimated the shows could generate $140 million for Colorado’s gross domestic product.”
The Keystone: July 19, 2023 by Patrick Berkery
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Businesses and residents react to Denver Mayor Mike Johnston’s emergency declaration on homelessness
CBS News Colorado: July 18, 2023 by Austen Erblat
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Taylor Swift tour boosts US economy
“Its effect, known as ‘Swiftonomics,’ according to the Common Sense Institute, would add to Colorado’s gross domestic product about $140 million, for his two dates in Denver.”
Euro ES Euro: July 18, 2023
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Denver Mayor Mike Johnston declares homelessness emergency on his first day in office
” In 2022, there were a total of 6,884 unhoused individuals in the city. More than 2,000 of those were unsheltered. The Common Sense Institute reports that the city spent $516 million on homelessness last year.”
KUNC NPR for Norther Colorado: July 18, 2023 by Lucas Brady Woods
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Denver’s new mayor Mike Johnston declares state of emergency on homelessness
“On his second day in office, Denver Mayor Mike Johnston declared a state of emergency on the issue of homelessness and housing insecurity in Denver.”
CBS News Colorado: July 18, 2023 by Austen Erblat
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Homeless “emergency” declared by Denver’s new mayor
“According to the Common Sense Institute, Denver’s homeless population has risen by almost 44%—nearly 12 times faster than the city’s total population growth between 2016 and 2021. The total population in Denver actually declined by over 4,000 people in 2021. “
KKTV 11 News: July 18, 2023 by Tony Keith
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Newly minted Denver mayor Mike Johnston issues emergency declaration over homelessness
“Johnston made the announcement at a Tuesday morning news conference, less than 24 hours after he was sworn in as Denver’s 46th mayor, setting the goal to house 1,000 unhoused people by end of year.”
Denver 7: July 18, 2023 by Landon Haaf
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When Taylor Swift came to Denver she brought a spectacle and left a $140 million economic afterglow
“Concertgoers spend an average of $1,327 on related purchases according to a report by the Common Sense Institute, contributing more than $200 million in direct consumer spending during the Denver concerts.”
The Colorado Sun: July 17, 2023 by Parker Yamasaki
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Tomi Lahren says Taylor Swift is ‘better qualified’ than Biden to run US economy
“During her shows in Colorado on Friday and Saturday this past weekend, Swift made a reported economic impact of $200 million in consumer spending with $140 million added to the state’s GDP, according to Common Sense Institute.”
New York Post: July 17, 2023 by Kristen Altus, Fox Business
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Denver Chamber of Commerce Pres JJ Ament Talks City’s Cost of Crime
850 KOA: July 17, 2023
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Tour diễn của Taylor Swift tạo lợi ích kinh tế khủng, Fed cũng phải chú ý
“Cuối tuần này, Eras Tour đã đến thành phố Denver (bang Colorado) và một ước tính từ Common Sense Institute cho thấy buổi diễn sẽ tạo thêm 140 triệu USD cho GDP  của bang.”
Vietnam Biz: July 16, 2023
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Five Takeaways From Taylor Swift’s Eras Tour in Denver
“The Eras Tour, in which Swift is playing songs from each of her albums (or eras), is a cultural phenomenon, and its impact is felt not just in its trail of green — the Common Sense Institute estimated the tour would contribute $140 million to Colorado’s GDP — but in the horde of impassioned fans, who descended on Empower Field this weekend with friendship bracelets and glitter…lots of glitter.”
Westword: July 16, 2023 by Emily Ferguson
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PERSPECTIVE: Pot’s honeymoon is over
“Colorado’s dispensaries have also become magnets for crime. Denver reported in 2023 that ‘Marijuana businesses make up less than 1% of all businesses in Denver but account for approximately 6% of all reported business burglaries.’ And don’t let the industry fool you: they’re not stealing the cash — thieves are targeting the much more valuable product. This, combined with the Common Sense Institute’s report last year of astronomical statewide increases in crime since the year we legalized marijuana should bring additional concern.”
The Denver Gazette: July 16, 2023 by Luke Niforatos
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EDITORIAL: Make fighting crime the highest priority
The Gazette: July 16, 2023
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Quand Taylor Swift attire la curiosité de la Fed : sa tournée américaine pourrait générer 4,6 milliards de dollars, soit plus que le PIB de 35 pays
“Le Common Sense Institute estime que les deux concerts généreront 140 millions de dollars pour le produit intérieur brut de l’État, et environ 200 millions de dollars de dépenses de consommation.”
Business AM: July 14, 2023 by Baptiste Lambert
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El impacto de Taylor Swift en la economía de Estados Unidos llama la atención de la Fed
“Este fin de semana, la gira de Taylor Swift llegará a Denver, Colorado. Una estimación del Common Sense Institute sugiere que el concierto generará 140 millones de dólares (mdd) para el producto interno bruto (PIB) del estado.”
Business Insider Mexico: July 14, 2023
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(Opinion) Other Voices: ‘Taylored’ to Colorado’s economy
Greeley Tribune: July 14, 2023
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Taylor Swift’s Denver Concerts Could Give Colorado Economy $140 Million Boost
“According to Kelly Caufield, the executive director of the Common Sense Institute, Swift’s concerts have become a catalyst for economic growth, demonstrating her undeniable influence on local businesses and communities.”
UK Snack Attack: July 14, 2023
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Taylor Swift, NY Yankees: How Denver hotels are preparing for an influx of visitors
“Experts say this will be a “milestone” weekend for Denver, one the city hasn’t experienced in nearly a decade.”
Denver Business Journal: July 14, 2023 by Cassidy Ritter
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New study from CSI shows crime costing Colorado billions
“A new study from the Common Sense Institute shows the billions of dollars crime is costing Colorado.”
KKCO 11 News: July 14, 2023
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Taylor Swift’s Denver Concerts Projected to Boost Colorado’s Economy by $140 Million
“Kelly Caufield, executive director of the Common Sense Institute, expressed the impact of Swift’s powerful performances on the economy. She stated, ‘With her powerful performances that captivate millions of fans, Swift’s concerts have become the catalyst for an extraordinary economic surge, proving her indisputable impact on local businesses and communities.'”
NNN: July 15, 2023 by Jibril Adamu
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A Not-So ‘Cruel Summer’: Taylor Swift’s Tour Gets Nod for Boosting Economy
Yahoo Entertainment: July 14, 2023 by Eileen AJ Connelly
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Tomi Lahren argues Taylor Swift is ‘better qualified’ to run US economy than Biden
“During her shows in Colorado on Friday and Saturday this past weekend, Swift made a reported economic impact of $200 million in consumer spending with $140 million added to the state’s GDP, according to Common Sense Institute.”
Fox Business: July 17, 2023 by Kristen Altus
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Taylor Swift’s economic impact catches eye of Fed
“According to the Common Sense Institute, Swift’s tour in the US is expected to generate $4.6 billion in direct consumer spending.”
China Daily: July 14 2023
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Taylor Swift’s effect on the economy has caught the eye of the Fed
“This weekend, Swift’s tour is set to hit Denver, and one estimate from the Common Sense Institute suggests the concert may generate $140 million for the state’s gross domestic product.”
Markets Insider: July 14, 2023 by Matthew Fox
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Taylor Swift’s two Denver concerts could give Colorado economy a $140 million boost
Total spending could surpass $200 million this weekend, Common Sense Institute estimates”
Fort Morgan Times: July 14, 2023 Aldo Svaldi
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Business Headlines – The economic impact of Taylor Swift
“Taylor Swift’s concerts in Denver could raise Colorado’s GDP by $140 million for two evening performances. That’s according to the Common Sense Institute, a think tank focused on Colorado’s economy.”
News.KGNU.org: July 14, 2023 by Por Jaijongkit
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Indianapolis – Friday Business Headlines
“This weekend, Swift’s tour hits Denver, and one estimate from the Common Sense Institute suggests the concert will generate $140 million for the state’s gross domestic product.”
WISHTV.com: July 14, 2023 by Kyla Russell
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Colorado Inside Out features the Cost of Crime
PBS: July 14, 2023
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Two chart-toppers — one in pop, the other in crime
“The most recent report from the Common Sense Institute, for which I am a Criminal Justice Fellow, makes clear that crime in Colorado today is far worse than it was in 2008, when the pop country Fearless album blew up the charts.” 
The Gazette: July 14, 2023 by George Brauchler
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Report: Taylor Swift concerts a $140M boost to Colorado economy
“Swift’s sold out shows at the 76,000-seat Empower Field on July 14 and 15 are projected to generate $201.7 million in direct consumer spending, according to the Common Sense Institute’s report, which summarized existing analyses, estimates and studies measuring the economic impact of Swift’s concerts throughout the U.S.”
The Center Square: July 11, 2023 by Joe Mueller
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Report: Colorado crime cost $27 billion last year
“Free market think tank Common Sense Institute released its annual Cost of Crime analysis, wherein researchers calculate the direct and indirect economic hole left by violence, theft, fraud and property damage. The study included the period between 2008 and 2023.”
Fox 31: July 13, 2023 by DJ Summers
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‘Taylored’ to Colorado’s economy | Denver Gazette
“That windfall shouldn’t be underestimated and is worth noting. As reported Wednesday in The Denver Gazette, the state’s business community is anticipating a big impact. Business groups are enthusiastic and cite a report by the think tank Common Sense Institute that’s cleverly dubbed, ‘Swiftonomics: Eras Tour Impact on Colorado.'”
Colorado Politics: July 13, 2023 by Denver Gazette Editorial Board
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Here’s how much Taylor Swift’s Eras Tour is generating for Denver’s economy
“The superstar’s shows Friday and Saturday at Empower Field at Mile High are estimated to bring in $140 million to Colorado’s gross domestic product, according to a new report from the Common Sense Institute, a business industry think tank.”
Axios Denver: July 13, 2023 by Alayna Alvarez
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New study from CSI shows crime costing Colorado billions
“A new study from the Common Sense Institute shows the billions of dollars crime is costing Colorado.
$27.2 billion is the estimated cost crime is having on the state. The report from the CSI shows summer homicides have spiked, murder rates increased by 18% from the first half of 2022 to the first half of 2023.”
KKCO 11 News: July 13, 2023 by Hannah Hickman
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Taylor Swift concerts expected to generate $140M for state economy
“Taylor Swift will perform for two nights at Empower Field at Mile High, but experts say her impact on the local economy will be felt long after her final encore.”
Denver Business Journal: July 11, 2023 by Cassidy Ritter
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El Paso County man already facing attempted murder charge shot at a deputy
“In recent weeks, he authored a report for the Common Sense Institute that dives into ways to reduce crime rates in our communities. He outlines that many of these bond decisions fall at the feet of our judicial bench who are not properly accessing the risks associated with releasing people like Braden back into the community.”
KRDO: July 11, 2023 by Sean Rice
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Hey Swifties, here’s how to protect yourself against scammers in case you’re still hunting for a ticket
“The country-turned pop star is expected to generate $140 million to the state’s GDP, with Colorado “Swifities” spending about $200 million over the course of two days, according to the Common Sense Institute.”
Denver 7 KMGH: July 11, 2023 by Óscar Contreras
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The suggested economic impact of the Taylor Swift concerts is probably overhyped
“The conservative think tank the Common Sense Institute put out a press release on the projected economic impact. We asked economists at CSU to fact check the claim.”
9 News: July 11, 2023 by Kyle Clark
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Taylor Swift “Eras” tour coming to Denver estimated to bring in $140 million
“‘There’s national data that suggests the average Taylor Swift concert goer is spending about $1,300. For the full show experience: the tickets, the travel, the food, the merchandise, the lodging, this is all incredibly powerful to the Denver economy,’ Kelly Caufield, executive director for the Common Sense Institute said.”
Denver 7 KMGH: July 11, 2023 by Katie Parkins, Deb Stanley
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How much people are punished for stealing a car in Colorado no longer depends on how much the car is worth
“Colorado has earned a place of infamy for car thefts in recent years. The business-oriented think tank Common Sense Institute found that Colorado led the nation in car thefts in 2021 and averaged around 4,000 thefts a month for the first half of 2022. Car thefts have declined since then, according to Colorado State Patrol, which trumpeted the new law as a help to future enforcement.”
CPR News: July 4, 2023 by Megan Verlee
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Is partnering with private sector key to addressing housing needs?
“In February of this year the Common Sense Institute issued a Grand Junction Housing Affordability Report.
While the report covered a variety of broad drivers of the costs in our local housing market, including a current gap of between 900 and 2,400 units, one major regulation was highlighted that demonstrates the economic impact of government policy on housing affordability.”
The Daily Sentinel: July 2, 2023 by Diane Schwenke
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New auto theft laws take effect in Colorado
“Several new state laws went into effect Saturday, including measures to punish car thieves with greater penalties.”
Denver 7: July 1, 2023 by Brandon Richard
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2023 | June
2023 | May

Colorado’s fire chiefs say property tax relief bill would “devastate” districts
“The bill also changes the formula for the Taxpayer Bill of Rights and the free market think tank, Common Sense Institute, released analysis finding it will eliminate all TABOR refunds within the next few years.”
CBS News Colorado: May 5, 2023 by Shaun Boyd
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Report: Denver housing deficit grows as affordability decreases, property taxes skyrocket
“The Common Sense Institute published its Colorado Housing Affordability Report on Thursday with an analysis of trends in housing affordability in seven Denver metro counties and five other large counties in Colorado. Affordability, determined by the purchase price of a home plus mortgage interest, decreased by more than 100% in all but one county – Douglas – which came in at 99%”.
The Center Square: May 5, 2023 by Joe Mueller
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2023 | April

PERSPECTIVE: Denver mayoral candidates answer The Gazette
Gazette: The Common Sense Institute has estimated that two thirds of $1 billion in public and private nonprofit funding will be spent this year on homeless services in the Denver metro area. Would your plan on homelessness require even more money — or to spend current revenue more wisely or differently?”
The Gazette: April 30, 2023
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Recent Colorado laws will cost businesses $2 billion, analysis shows
“The study from the Common Sense Institute said the long-term annual cost of just seven laws and regulations totals $2 billion.”
The Denver Gazette: April 30, 2023 by Scott Weiser
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Brauchler 4-27-23 7am
Next, former Denver D.A. Mitch Morrissey joins to talk about a new study he co-authored about auto theft rates in Colorado. 
The George Show with George Brauchler
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EDITORIAL: Curb the cost of car theft — pass SB 97
“A report released Wednesday by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute found the motor-vehicle theft rate in Colorado has skyrocketed 233% since 2014.”
The Gazette: April 27, 2023 
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Report: Colorado insurance premiums up $277M from increased auto thefts
“Colorado’s auto theft rate in 2022 was 801.2  thefts per 100,000 residents, up from 240.6 in 2014 – a 233% increase, said the report by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank. There were 46,568 vehicles reported stolen in the state last year, totalling an estimated $530 million in value.”
The Square Center: April 26, 2023
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EDITORIAL: Proposed law would harm Colorado women
“As mentioned in this space last week, a study by Colorado’s Commonsense Institute, found Colorado has suffered a substantial drop in companies relocating here in the past two years. The study identified two major factors: the soaring cost of housing and the rising cost of doing business — ramifications of excessive state regulations.”
The Denver Gazette: April 24, 2023
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PERSPECTIVE: Mayoral candidates answer The Gazette
Williams: We have been reducing crime, as a Commonsense Institute study documented. There are two key factors. Number one is to enhance our police department by increasing the number of officers. I’ve supported that, and I think we’ve added 62 new officers since I’ve been on City Council.”
The Gazette: April 23, 2023
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GUEST COLUMN: We must fix Colorado’s housing crisis
“According to the Common Sense Institute, Colorado’s “nonregional, local-control housing construct has severely constrained the industry’s ability to modernize, mitigating any opportunity to harness economies of scale, resulting in housing being produced at max cost.”
The Gazette: April 23, 2023 by Governor Jared Polis
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COLUMN: DA’s pledge to “get Trump” isn’t justice | George Brauchler
“George Brauchler is the former district attorney for the 18th Judicial District. He also is an Owens Early Criminal Justice Fellow at the Common Sense Institute and president of the Advance Colorado Academy, which identifies, trains and connects conservative leaders in Colorado.”
The Denver Gazette: April 13, 2023 by George Brauchler
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Delivery bill dangerous, misguided | OPINION
“New research from the nonpartisan Common Sense Institute estimates the bill would actually cost between $2.8 million and $4 million a year — four to five times the original estimate. We think the costs could be even greater still.”
Colorado Politics: April 13, 2023 by Maz Rettig
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GUEST COLUMN: Time for truth in sentencing in Colorado | Michael Fields
“The average monthly crime rate per 100,000 residents has increased from 442 in 2008 to 530 today; our murder rate is still 30% higher than it was pre-pandemic, and according to the Common Sense Institute, our larger cities remain in the top 10 in the nation for violent crime, rape, robbery, burglary, larceny/theft, motor vehicle theft, property crime, and arson.”
The Denver Gazette: April 13, 2023 by Michael Fields
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County commissioner asks City Council member to take action favorable to the commissioner’s personal financial interest
“The city’s housing shortage is significant. The Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization, reported in February 2023 that the housing deficit last year in Colorado Springs ranged from 10,614 to 21,150 units.”
Colorado Springs Indy: April 12, 2023 by Pam Zubeck
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Colorado inflation up 1.3% in recent months, federal data shows
“That rate is down from 6.4%, the Common Sense Institute noted in a report on the BLS data.”
The Center Square: April 12, 2023 by Derek Draplin
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Far-reaching housing proposal would impact Colorado communities big and small
“The Common Sense Institute found Colorado had a housing shortage of 225,000 units in 2021, and the affordability of purchasing a home was the lowest in 33 years. According to the Bell Policy center, half of Colorado renters are cost-burdened, or spending more than a third of their income on housing.”
KUNC: April 11, 2023 by Lucas Brady Woods
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PERSPECTIVE: Another year, another record budget
“In December, the Common Sense Institute issued The Colorado Budget Then & Now. The annual report details a comparison of state budgets over the past 20 years and provides a guideline for examining the 2023-2024 budget. The trends in appropriations reflect the shifting priorities that are a direct result of laws and budgets passed each legislative session.”
The Gazette: April 7, 2023 by Kelly Caufield
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Denver would rather leave a golf course vacant than build new housing near a train station
Fortune: April 5, 2023
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Denver draws backlash over opening day preparations
“A 2021 study by the Common Sense Institute in collaboration with researchers at the University of Colorado Denver estimated the city spent more than $100,000 per homeless person per year.”
Straight Arrow News: April 4, 2023
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Brauchler 4-3-23 7am
“Former Denver police chief and now fellow at common sense institute, Paul Pazen joins George during the second hour and discusses the Mayoral race and what can be done for the city to save it.”
The George Show with George Brauchler: April 3, 2023
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Research finds Colorado bill on gig payments underestimates cost to state
“However, the Common Sense Institute found 248,378 drivers operating in 2022, according to data from four delivery and transportation companies.” 
The Center Square: April 2, 2023
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2023 | March

Far-reaching housing proposal would impact Colorado communities big and small
“The Common Sense Institute found Colorado had a housing shortage of 225,000 units in 2021, and the affordability of purchasing a home was the lowest in 33 years. According to the Bell Policy center, half of Colorado renters are cost-burdened, or spending more than a third of their income on housing.”
KUNC: April 11, 2023 by Lucas Brady Woods
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PERSPECTIVE: Another year, another record budget
“In December, the Common Sense Institute issued The Colorado Budget Then & Now. The annual report details a comparison of state budgets over the past 20 years and provides a guideline for examining the 2023-2024 budget. The trends in appropriations reflect the shifting priorities that are a direct result of laws and budgets passed each legislative session.”
The Gazette: April 7, 2023 by Kelly Caufield
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Denver would rather leave a golf course vacant than build new housing near a train station
Fortune: April 5, 2023
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Denver draws backlash over opening day preparations
“A 2021 study by the Common Sense Institute in collaboration with researchers at the University of Colorado Denver estimated the city spent more than $100,000 per homeless person per year.”
Straight Arrow News: April 4, 2023
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Brauchler 4-3-23 7am
“Former Denver police chief and now fellow at common sense institute, Paul Pazen joins George during the second hour and discusses the Mayoral race and what can be done for the city to save it.”
The George Show with George Brauchler: April 3, 2023
Listen>>

Research finds Colorado bill on gig payments underestimates cost to state
“However, the Common Sense Institute found 248,378 drivers operating in 2022, according to data from four delivery and transportation companies.” 
The Center Square: April 2, 2023
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Liberal city’s ‘disgraceful’ move before baseball’s opening day has activists furious
“A 2021 report estimated the city of Denver spent between $41,679 and $104,201 per homeless person per year.”
Fox News: March 30, 2023
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Leslie Herod shares plans to build on 80 city-owned vacant lots in Denver
“A study from the Common Sense Institute found Denver needs between 13,000 and 31,000 units.”
The Denver Gazette: March 29, 2023
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Legislating a vendetta makes bad policy | George Brauchler
“George Brauchler is the former district attorney for the 18th judicial district. He also is an Owens Early Criminal Justice Fellow at the Common Sense Institute…”
The Gazette: March 30, 2023 by George Brauchler
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Far-reaching housing proposal would impact Colorado communities big and small
“The Common Sense Institute found Colorado had a housing shortage of 225,000 units in 2021, and the affordability of purchasing a home was the lowest in 33 years.”
NPR for Northern Colorado: March 29, 2023 by Lucas Brady Woods
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The Policing Paradox
“An October report by the Common Sense Institute, a conservative think tank, blamed Colorado’s rising crime rates on changes in state law that it said had reduced the prison and parole populations.”
The Washington Post: March 27, 2023 by
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Meet the people being priced out of Denver as surging housing costs outpace wage growth
“Between August 2015 and August 2022, the average hourly wage in Colorado increased 27%, rising to $34.71 from $27, according to housing affordability research from Colorado’s Common Sense Institute.” 
The Denver Post: March 26, 2023 by Elizabeth Hernandez
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Celebrating Women’s History Month: Meet the Women Leaders Behind the Common Sense Institute
“From women’s history to history-in-the-making, Common Sense Institute is a rare, women-led think tank stepping up to take problems head on.”
Colorado Biz Magazine: March 24, 2023 by Jon Haubert
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Former Denver Police Chief Pazen joins Common Sense Institute as fellow
“Former Denver Police Chief Paul Pazen has joined Common Sense Institute as a public safety fellow, the group announced Friday. “
The Denver Gazette: March 24, 2023 by Luige Del Puerto
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Colorado’s unemployment rate ticks up to 2.9%
“An analysis by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, said the jobs added last month showed “a return to steady employment growth after a loss in January.”
The Center Square: March 24, 2023
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EDITORIAL: Kelly Brough will bridge the gaps in public safety
“Meanwhile, a report by the Common Sense Institute finds that Denver’s crime rates are still higher than before the pandemic. Metro Denver is among the most crime-ridden metro areas in America, especially for auto theft.”
The Denver Gazette: March 24, 2023
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Haubert sworn in as Westminster police chief
“The Common Sense Institute, a Greenwood Village-based non-profit focused on economic research, found Colorado to be the top state in America for auto thefts in a study published Sept. 8, and four Colorado cities rank in the top ten in the United States. Those cities are Denver, Aurora, Westminster and Pueblo.” 
The Westminster Window: March 23, 2023 by Luke Zarzecki
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Metro Moves: AARP appoints Sara Schueneman as state director
“Cinamon Watson has joined the Common Sense Institute as the Chief Operating Officer according to a press release.”
The Denver Gazette: March 13, 2023 by Savannah Mehrtens
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Colorado unemployment at 2.8% for January
“While the state’s unemployment rate was 2.8%, the same as December, “the state has still not recovered to the pre-pandemic employment-to-population ratio,” according to an analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank.”
The Center Square: March 13, 2023 by Derek Draplin
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New hope for Colorado’s homeless? | Colorado Springs Gazette
“Colorado’s Common Sense Institute studied years of results from the annual homelessness census, the Point in Time survey — used by communities to tap federal funding for homeless services. It concluded “unlike several places in the Denver metro area and the region as a whole, Colorado Springs is not experiencing a significant rise in its homeless population.””
Colorado Politics: March 6, 2023
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EDITORIAL: Kelly Brough is up to Denver’s crime fight
“As also noted in The Gazette’s report last week, a recent Common Sense Institute report shows Denver’s crime rates remain worse than before the pandemic. Metro Denver is among the most crime-ridden metro areas in America, especially for auto theft.”
The Denver Gazette: March 6, 2023
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Denver’s ‘affordable’ units ordinance, building permits delays drive frustrations, costs
“The analysis from the Common Sense Institute says Denver is short between 13,000 and 31,000 housing units today and will need to build between 31,000 and 49,000 more to accommodate expected population growth by 2028.”
The Denver Gazette: March 5, 2023 by Savannah Mehrtens
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PERSPECTIVE: Homelessness — a Colorado problem
“In 2021, Common Sense Institute (CSI) released The Economic Footprint of Homelessness in Metro Denver. The study provided a clear understanding of the size and scope of homelessness and the economic footprint — in other words, what resources Colorado is investing, where they are spent, and how. Since then, CSI has issued new studies providing updates and best practices.”
The Denver Gazette: March 5, 2023 by Kelly Caufield
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EDITORIAL: New hope for Colorado’s homeless?
“Colorado’s Common Sense Institute studied years of results from the annual homelessness census, the Point in Time survey — used by communities to tap federal funding for homeless services. It concluded, “unlike several places in the Denver metro area and the region as a whole, Colorado Springs is not experiencing a significant rise in its homeless population.”
The Gazette: March 5, 2023
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Colorado property owners to face astronomical tax increases next year
“A fundamental flaw of Colorado’s property tax system is that changes in property values, either up or down, have little bearing on how much local governments require in funding, said Chris Brown, director of policy and research with the Common Sense Institute, a pro-business think tank.”
Greeley Tribune: March 4, 2023 by Aldo Svaldi
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Would you let Denver Police have access to your car’s GPS System?
Colorado continually ranks #1 in auto thefts in the country, according to the conservative leaning Common Sense Institute. “
Denverite: March 3, 2023 by Tony Gorman
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Poll: Crime, homelessness, housing top issues for Denver voters
“A recent Common Sense Institute report shows Denver’s crime rates remain worse than before the COVID-19 pandemic, making Colorado’s biggest city among the most crime-ridden metro areas in America, particularly when it comes to car theft.”
The Denver Gazette: March 2, 2023 by Alex Edwards
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Xcel, Denver insist city’s power grid can handle higher load from electrification
“Previous analysis hints the expense will be significant. In its analysis last year of a law that requires the adoption of “green” building codes, the Common Sense Institute said it could cost homeowners statewide between $59 and $68 billion by 2031, exacerbating Colorado’s already acute housing shortage.”
The Denver Gazette: March 2, 2023 by Scott Weiser
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Colorado Springs more effective than Denver in handling homelessness crisis
“The drop in the city’s number of the unsheltered homeless population — individuals who sleep in cars, parks, abandoned building or camps —  “suggests that providers and policymakers in Colorado Springs have responded effectively to the city’s shortage of shelter,” said the report from the Common Sense Institute. “
The Gazette: March 1, 2023 by Debbie Kelly & Luige Del Puerto
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Activists shed light on homeless issues facing Grand Junction
““Homelessness: From the Ground Up” followed last week’s Common Sense Institute report that homelessness in Grand Junction increased 43% between 2019 and 2021.”
The Daily Sentinel: March 1, 2023 by Nathan Deal
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EDITORIAL: A Colorado crackdown on auto theft
“The vast majority of vehicles stolen in Colorado are valued at the lower end of the scale, says a 2022 report from Colorado’s Common Sense Institute.”
The Gazette: March 1, 2023
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2023 | February

Activists shed light on homeless issues facing Grand Junction
““Homelessness: From the Ground Up” followed last week’s Common Sense Institute report that homelessness in Grand Junction increased 43% between 2019 and 2021.”
The Daily Sentinel: March 1, 2023 by Nathan Deal
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EDITORIAL: A Colorado crackdown on auto theft
“The vast majority of vehicles stolen in Colorado are valued at the lower end of the scale, says a 2022 report from Colorado’s Common Sense Institute.”
The Gazette: March 1, 2023
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Colorado Springs more effective than Denver in handling homelessness crisis, report finds
“The drop in the city’s number of the unsheltered homeless population — individuals who sleep in cars, parks, abandoned building or camps —  “suggests that providers and policymakers in Colorado Springs have responded effectively to the city’s shortage of shelter,” said the report from the Common Sense Institute. “
The Denver Gazette: February 28, 2023 by Debbie Kelley, Luige Del Puerto
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‘A message to criminals’: Auto theft bill advances in Colorado Senate
“Mitch Morrissey of the Common Sense Institute testified that Colorado started to “go soft on auto theft” in 2014 and again in 2019, resulting in increases in stolen vehicles.”
The Center Square: February 28, 2023 by Joe Mueller
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Opinion: Are Colorado legislators trying to drive businesses out?
“This is no mere conjecture; studies of schedule predictability mandates found businesses responded by “offering employees less freedom to make schedule changes, offering fewer full-time jobs, increasing the share of part-time jobs, and scheduling fewer people per shift,” noted a recent Common Sense Institute analysis.
The Denver Post: February 28, 2023 by Krista Kafer
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Massive changes to service industries hang in balance
“Chris Brown, Vice President of policy and research at the business-focused Common Sense Institute, estimated the direct cost of compliance for a business with 250 workers will be between $2,200 and $5,800 per employee per year, totaling as much as $1 million annually.”
The Sum & Substance: February 27, 2023 
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Denver imposes natural gas ban on heating, cooling equipment in commercial buildings, multi-family housing
“In its analysis last year of a law that requires the adoption of “green” building codes, the Common Sense Institute said it could cost homeowners statewide between $59 and $68 billion by 2031, exacerbating Colorado’s already acute housing shortage.”
The Denver Gazette: February 27, 2023 by Scott Weiser
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Colorado lawmakers propose making all auto theft a felony, regardless of vehicle value
“Property crimes such as these, along with stolen vehicles, are on the rise in Colorado, a 2021 Common Sense Institute report states.”
Colorado Politics: February 27, 2023 by Hannah Metzger
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Is comparing Colorado Springs’ and Denver’s homeless populations fair or unfair?
“The Greenwood Village-based Common Sense Institute, which describes itself as a nonpartisan, independent research organization, studied years of results from a mandatory annual census known as the Point in Time survey — which is necessary for communities to receive federal funding for homeless services — and determined that “unlike several places in the Denver metro area and the region as a whole, Colorado Springs is not experiencing a significant rise its homeless population.”
The Gazette: February 26, 2023 by Debbie Kelley
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Report: Grand Junction Homelessness
“The Common Sense Institute released a report Wednesday saying the number of unhoused, and particularly unsheltered and unhoused, people has been rising rapidly in Grand Junction in recent years.”
Grand Junction Sentinel: February 23, 2023 by Sam Klomhaus
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A Colorado Springs study shoes that crime trend shows crime is down
“The report from the Common Sense Institute analyzed more than a decade’s worth of numbers. Despite what you may believe, it actually shows that crime in the Springs is down, but a much different story statewide.”
Yahoo News: February 21, 2023 
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LETTERS: Fair workweek bill hurts Colorado businesses
“The Common Sense Institute examined the bill and found that the regulations would lead to a cost increase of up to $5,800 per shift employee.”
Aurora Sentinel: February 21, 2023 by Michael Fields
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Poll: Strong response to Denver’s crime would attract voters’ support; voters oppose ‘defund’ police
“A recent study by the Common Sense Institute, for example, noted that the city’s crime rates remain worse than before the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic, making it among the most crime-ridden metro areas in America, particularly when it comes to car theft.”
The Denver Gazette: February 21, 2023 by Luige Del Puerto
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Missing the Bus – Op-Ed – Education Transportation
“In a report I wrote recently for the Common Sense Institute, I found that Colorado fails to collect data that would help inform policymakers on how best to improve access to transportation services, better align with families’ transportation needs, reduce reporting and reimbursement bureaucracy, and upgrade the funding system.”
The Gazette: February 19, 2023 by Jason Gaulden
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What’s Working: Denver inflation falls to 6.4%, which means we still have high inflation
“Some business owners said they’re already holding off on expanding in Colorado because of the bill. Others said the cost of compliance would be high —  $70,000 per year per location, said the Colorado Restaurant Association; $2,200 and $5,800 per shift employee per year, or up to $1 million for a business with 200 shift workers and 50 nonshift workers, according to a report from the Common Sense Institute, a think tank in Greenwood Village.”
The Colorado Sun: February 18, 2023
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Takeaways From Seven-Hour Hearing on Fair Workweek Bill
“Chris Brown, vice president of Policy & Research at the Common Sense Institute, predicted that the costs would run between $2,200 and $5,800 per shift employee per year for covered businesses with 200 shift workers.”
Westword: February 17, 2023 by Helen Xu
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Kelly Caufield on KOA

859 KOA: February 16, 2023
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Denver ranks in the top 10 in the U.S. for both auto theft and property crime.
“The report by the Common Sense Institute suggests that Denver’s crime situation is specific to the city itself, rather than reflecting a broader trend of rising crime across the state.”
Patch.com: February 16, 2023
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Hyundai offers free anti-theft software after increase in stolen cars
“According to a study by the Common Sense Institute, Denver is the third-highest city with more than 100,000 residents in auto theft.”
KDVR Fox 31: February 16, 2023 by Morgan Whitley
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Nine cities reached record homicides in 2022
“Violent crime in general is on the rise across Colorado, and the Common Sense Institute points to various contributing factors, including a heavier presence of fentanyl, drug trafficking, a 15.5% decrease in Colorado’s incarceration rate and certain criminal justice policy reforms.”
WFVX Bangor Fox22: February 16, 2023
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Denver among top 10 in the nation for auto theft property crime, rape
“The Common Sense Institute, a free-market think tank and policy analysis group, published a study on Denver crime Tuesday.”
KDVR Fox 31: February 16, 2023
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This Denver district’s crime rate was 91% higher than the second worst district
“Denver’s District 9, which includes the Central Business District, Union Station and Five Points, holds by far the worst crime rate in the city, according to a report from the Common Sense Institute.”
Denver Gazette: February 15, 2023
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Nine cities reached record homicides in 2022 as staffing shortages plagued police departments
“Violent crime in general is on the rise across Colorado, and the Common Sense Institute points to various contributing factors, including a heavier presence of fentanyl, drug trafficking, a 15.5% decrease in Colorado’s incarceration rate and certain criminal justice policy reforms.”
Fox News: February 15, 2023 by Audrey Conklin
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Metro Denver inflation rate moves lower — but not by much — last month
“Since 2020, the average Colorado household has spent $12,779 more due to inflation, according to a number provided by the Common Sense Institute.”
The Denver Post: February 15, 2023 by Aldo Svaldi
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Denver’s car theft, property crime rates still shocking compared to other cities
““In 2021, CSI produced the first analysis of the Colorado crime wave,” Common Sense Institute Executive Director Kelly Caufield told The Denver Gazette. “The bad news — Denver is still in the midst of a dangerous wave that is harming victims, ravaging the economy and preventing the city from flourishing.””
The Denver Gazette: February 14, 2023
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Chris Hansen portrays mayoral candidacy as antidote to Denver’s crime, homelessness in TV commercial
“Hansen coincidentally released his TV commercial on the same day a new report from Common Sense Institute shows Denver’s crime rates remain worse than before the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic, making Colorado’s biggest city among the most crime-ridden metro areas in America, notably when it comes to car theft.”
The Denver Gazette: February 14, 2023
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Denver crime up 75 percent since 2008, “dangerous crime wave” underway
“Denver is in the midst of a “dangerous crime wave,” according to a recent research study conducted by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), which has named Colorado’s capitol city among the top 10 worst cities in the United States for for crime. “
Out There Colorado: February 14, 2023 by Tamera Twitty
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Metro Moves: NEXT Gallery to open Casa Bonita Art Show this week
“The Common Sense Institute announced the Owens-Early Criminal Justice Fellowship on Feb. 10.”
Denver Gazette: February 13, 2023 by Savannah Merhtens
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Calls grow for statewide #Colorado water #conservation standards; some cities skeptical
“A new report commissioned by the Common Sense Institute and written by Colorado water veterans Jennifer Gimbel and Eric Kuhn, cites the need for broader conservation measures such as removing non-functional turf in new development, among other things.”
Coyote Gulch: February 13, 2023
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Colorado Democrats seek to lift rent control ban
Washington Examiner: February 8, 2023 by Joe Mueller
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How many more hours of work will a Denverite need to pay for a home
“In 2023, Coloradans will face municipal elections in some of our most populated cities and we want to make sure voters have the facts to make informed decisions about some of the biggest issues facing those communities,” Kelly Caufield, executive director of the Common Sense Institute, said in a statement.”
Out There Colorado: February 6, 2023
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Report: Affordable housing a crisis in Colorado
““In 2023, Coloradans will face municipal elections in some of our most populated cities and we want to make sure voters have the facts to make informed decisions about some of the biggest issues facing those communities,” Kelly Caufield, executive director of the Common Sense Institute, said in a statement.”
Our Community Now: February 6, 2023
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It takes twice as many hours to pay a mortgage than ten years ago
“The Common Sense Institute, a free-market think tank, released a series of studies last week on the expense of homes in Colorado Springs, Denver and Grand Junction.”
KDVR Fox 31: February 6, 2023
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Report: Affordable Housing a crisis in Colorado
“Finding, purchasing and paying for housing in Colorado continues to be a crisis, according to the nonpartisan nonprofit Common Sense Institute.”
The Center Square: February 2, 2023 by Joe Mueller
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Homebuyers will have to work harder to buy a home in Denver if they can
Denver Gazette: February 1, 2023
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2023 | January

In about face lawmakers seek tougher penalties on car theft particularly repeat offenders
Denver Gazette: January 31, 2023 by Marianne Goodland
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Tougher penalties for auto theft in Colorado could be coming after lawmakers about face

Denver Gazette: January 31, 2023 by Marianne Goodland
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A bid to curb Colorado auto theft
“The vast majority of vehicles stolen in Colorado are valued at the lower end of the scale, says a 2022 report from Colorado’s Common Sense Institute.”
Denver Gazette: January 31, 2023 by Editorial Board
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Amid spiking car thefts, state lawmakers want more severe punishment for thieves
“According to the Common Sense Institute, most motor vehicle theft happens in low-income neighborhoods. Most of the cars being stolen are valued between $15,000 and $24,000, followed by those valued between $5,000 and $10,000.”
Aspen Radio: January 31, 2023 by Lucas Bradley Woods
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Colorado’s school transportation system lacks transparency report says
“Colorado’s school transportation systems lack adequate oversight, according to a new report released Monday by the Common Sense Institute.”
Longmont Leader: January 30, 2023 by Amber Fisher
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In about face lawmakers seek tougher penalties on car theft particularly repeat offenders
“The vast majority of vehicles stolen in Colorado are valued at the lower end of the scale, according to a 2022 report from the Common Sense Institute, which reported last September that 85.6% of stolen vehicles are valued at less than $25,000, and 63.%% are valued at less than $15,000.”
Colorado Politics: January 30, 2023 by Marienne Goodland
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Metro Moves: Common Sense Institute names Economic Mobility Fellow
“Tamra Ryan has joined the Common Sense Institute (CSI) as the economic mobility fellow. Her role, which began on Jan. 27, will focus on researching issues that affect economic independence of individuals and aims to find how state and local jurisdictions can serve as a support system.”
The Denver Gazette: January 30, 2023 by Savannah Mehrtens
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Our TABOR Our Refunds
“In 2021, the Common Sense Institute published research that investigated our state’s increased education spending and where it has gone. “
Denver Gazette: January 29, 2023
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Let’s put Colorado first on its 150th report
“According to a November 2022 report from Common Sense Institute (CSI), elevated prices and rising interest rates have resulted in driving the affordability of purchasing a home to the lowest point in more than 33 years.”
Colorado Politics: January 27, 2023 by Dave Davia
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Colorado Democrats seek to lift states rent control ban with new bill
“Approximately 98% of Coloradans live in a county with an aggregate housing supply shortage, according to a report published last year by the Common Sense Institute. Between 46,600 and 72,600 permits are needed annually during the next two years to close the statewide housing supply deficit and meet the demands of future population growth.”
The Center Square: January 26, 2023 by Joe Mueller
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Early Childhood education is simply out of reach for most Longmont residents
“The high cost is simply impossible for some: 38% of the children in Colorado cannot access early childhood education because their families cannot afford the high prices (The Common Sense Institute).”
Longmont Daily Times Call
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Colorado Employers may soon be banned about asking candidates their age in job interviews
“Proponents say the changes would help cut back on age bias that hampers the careers and financial lives of a growing segment of Colorado’s workforce. Roughly one in four workers in the state are expected to be over the age of 54 by 2040, according to the Common Sense Institute, a Colorado-based economic research group.”
Colorado Public Radio: January 25, 2023 by Matt Bloom
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35,000 enroll in Colorado’s new public option
Analysis by the Common Sense Institute found the mandated price reductions without a reduction in health care costs would force medical providers to “cut costs in a way that impacts quality and access or pass on costs to the remaining private insurance market through higher prices.” 
The Center Square: January 19, 2023 by Joe Mueller
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Polis outlines ambitious plan on housing shortage, property tax hike, car theft in state address
Denver Gazette: January 19, 2023 by Luige del Puerto
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COLUMN: State of the State falls short on fixes of crime | George Brauchler
Denver Gazette: January 19, 2023 by George Brauchler
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Colorado’s Water Future: Leadership lessons from the past
Colorado Real Estate Journal: January 18, 2023
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Gov. Jared Polis focuses on housing and tax cuts in his fifth State of the State address
KUNC: January 17, 2023 by Lucas Brady Woods
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Polis outlines ambitious plan on housing shortage, property tax hike, car theft in state address
“Car theft in Denver, for example, is second-highest in America, and three other Colorado cities rank in the top 10, according to a study by the Common Sense Institute.”
Colorado Politics: January 17, 2023 by Luige del Puerto
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Any car stolen in Colorado — even cheap ones — should be a felony, lawmakers say
Few car thefts actually result in arrest — the Common Sense Institute put the statewide arrest rate at less than 10% in 2022″
Finger Lake Times: January 16, 2023 by Nick Coltrain
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Any car stolen in Colorado — even cheap ones — should be a felony, lawmakers say
Few car thefts actually result in arrest — the Common Sense Institute put the statewide arrest rate at less than 10% in 2022″
Sterling Journal-Advocate: January 16, 2023 by Nick Coltrain
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Any car stolen in Colorado — even cheap ones — should be a felony, lawmakers say
Few car thefts actually result in arrest — the Common Sense Institute put the statewide arrest rate at less than 10% in 2022″
Denver Post: January 16, 2023 by Nick Coltrain
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Any car stolen in Colorado — even cheap ones — should be a felony, lawmakers say
Few car thefts actually result in arrest — the Common Sense Institute put the statewide arrest rate at less than 10% in 2022″
Gwinnett Daily Post: January 16, 2023 by Nick Coltrain
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Any car stolen in Colorado should be a felony lawmakers say
“Few car thefts actually result in arrest — the Common Sense Institute put the statewide arrest rate at less than 10% in 2022″
Canon City Record: January 16, 2023 by Nick Coltrain
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Common Sense Institute Celebrates Free Enterprise Award Honorees
“On December 13, in connection with the issuance of its 2023 Colorado Free Enterprise Report, the Common Sense Institute (CSI) honored leaders who…”
The Villager: January 12, 2023 by Freda Miklin
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The grim economic truth of FAMLI, public option
“The Common Sense Institute released an analysis of fiscal projections for the program and found that, “under higher cost assumptions… the premium would need to grow to 1.7% to keep the fund solvent.”
Colorado Politics: January 11, 2023 by Jimmy Sengenberger
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Armstrong: Democrats cynically claim affordability as a priority
“As a recent report from the Common Sense Institute puts the point, “At its heart, the free enterprise system is one in which people are free to make choices about what’s best for their own particular circumstances and needs.”
Complete Colorado: January 10, 2023 by Ari Armstrong
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Colorado’s master-planned communities no longer national blockbusters
“The Common Sense Institute estimates Colorado builders need to pull between 20,000 and 46,000 permits a year through 2025 to close the gap in the state’s housing stock and keep up with future population growth. “
Denver Post: January 7, 2023 by Aldo Svaldi
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Colorado’s master-planned communities no longer national blockbusters
“The Common Sense Institute estimates Colorado builders need to pull between 20,000 and 46,000 permits a year through 2025 to close the gap in the state’s housing stock and keep up with future population growth. “
Denver Post: January 7, 2023 by Aldo Svaldi
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Analysis warns of increased costs, insolvency for Colorado’s new paid family leave program
“The Common Sense Institute warned in an analysis released on Friday that its modeling shows “the program could overburden Colorado employers with costs or become insolvent over the next several years.”
Center Square: January 6, 2023 by Derek Draplin
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Colorado hit by tsunami of higher taxes, new fees and paycheck cuts
“The general theme is: It’s becoming more expensive to live here in Colorado, and if we don’t watch out we’ll start to become less competitive to other states relative to attracting and keeping business,” economist Steven Byers at the conservative Common Sense Institute says.”
Axios: January 6, 2023 by John Frank
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His daughter’s car was stolen right in front of him. So he followed the thieves.
“Meanwhile, only 9.4% of thefts resulted in an arrest, according to data from the Common Sense Institute.”
Denver 7: January 5, 2023
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Colorado’s egg producers, consumers likely to see prices continue to climb
“Steven Byers, an economist with the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank in the state, said new laws often mean higher prices for consumers.”
Kiowa County Press: January 2, 2023
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Colorado’s egg producers, consumers likely to see prices continue to climb
“Steven Byers, an economist with the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank in the state, said new laws often mean higher prices for consumers.”
Center Square: January 2, 2023 by Joe Mueller
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Voters embraced affordable housing initiatives. Advocates say Congress should do the same.
According to a 2021 report co-authored by LiFari and Evelyn Lim, from Common Sense Institute, an organization that provides research on Colorado’s economy, the state has to provide 54,190 new housing units each year over a five-year period to make up for lack of building during the Great Recession and to address future housing needs.”
Pennsylvania Capital Star: January 1, 2023 by Casey Quinlan
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EDITORIAL: A new year — and new hope for Denver
“A Common Sense Institute report says the metro area is on track to spend two thirds of a billion dollars on homeless services in the coming year.”
The Denver Gazette: January 1, 2023
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2022 | December

850 KOA News: December 30, 2022
Listen >>

Group urges Colorado to focus on essentials due to Inflation, possible recession
“Colorado needs to prioritize essential issues and return to principles of free enterprise, according to the 2023 edition of the “Colorado Free Enterprise Report,” by the Common Sense Institute. “Colorado policymakers will face tough decisions with high inflation and a potential recession on the horizon,” the report said.”
The Trinidad Chronicle: December 26, 2022
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EDITORIAL: Let’s uplift Colorado’s homeless
“In a watershed study last year, Colorado’s Common Sense Institute found that in the metro Denver area alone, just under half a billion — billion, with a “b” — dollars a year was being spent on serving the homeless through public as well as private, nonprofit programs.”
The Gazette: December 21, 2022
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Colorado deserves truth in sentencing | Denver Gazette
“The link between declining incarceration and rising crime seems self-evident. A groundbreaking study released last year by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute reaffirmed that. The study found that the number of convicts behind bars at Colorado prisons dropped an astounding 23% from 2008 to 2021— while the number of crimes per year exploded by 47%.”
Denver Gazette: December 19, 2022
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Voters embraced affordable housing initiatives. Advocates say Congress should do the same.
“Peter LiFari, executive director at Maiker Housing Partners, a public housing authority in Adams County, Colorado, said that Congress often treats housing an “afterthought,” by keeping funding for housing affordability low. According to a 2021 report co-authored by LiFari and Evelyn Lim, from Common Sense Institute, an organization that provides research on Colorado’s economy, the state has to provide 54,190 new housing units each year over a five-year period to make up for lack of building during the Great Recession and to address future housing needs.”
Nebraska Examiner: December 19, 2022 by Casey Quinlan
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EDITORIAL: Colorado deserves truth in sentencing
“The link between declining incarceration and rising crime seems self-evident. A groundbreaking study released last year by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute reaffirmed that. The study found that the number of convicts behind bars at Colorado prisons dropped an astounding 23% from 2008 to 2021— while the number of crimes per year exploded by 47%.”
The Gazette: December 18, 2022
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What’s Working: Colorado sees decline in labor force but job numbers are still better than U.S.
““If a Federal Reserve-induced recession occurs in Colorado, and the unemployment rate reacts as it has in past recessions, then based on the recent increase in the Fed funds rate, the unemployment rate could increase by 5.9 percentage points and there could be up to 171,000 job losses,” said Steven L. Byers, senior economist at conservative think tank The Common Sense Institute in Greenwood Village, in a new report.”
The Colorado Sun: December 17, 2022 by Tamara Chuang
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Voters embraced affordable housing initiatives. Advocates say Congress should do the same.
“Peter LiFari, executive director at Maiker Housing Partners, a public housing authority in Adams County, Colorado, said Congress often treats housing as an “afterthought,” by keeping funding for housing affordability low. According to a 2021 report co-authored by LiFari and Evelyn Lim, from Common Sense Institute, an organization that provides research on Colorado’s economy, the state has to provide 54,190 new housing units each year over a five-year period to make up for lack of building during the Great Recession and to address future housing needs.”
Iowa Capital Dispatch: December 17, 2022 by Casey Quinlan
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Colorado’s labor force declines
““If a Federal Reserve-induced recession occurs in Colorado, and the unemployment rate reacts as it has in past recessions, then based on the recent increase in the Fed funds rate, the unemployment rate could increase by 5.9 percentage points, and there could be up to 171,000 job losses,” said Steven L. Byers, senior economist at conservative think tank The Common Sense Institute in Greenwood Village, in a new report.”
The Aspen Times: December 17, 2022
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PBS12 Livestream: December 16, 2022

Inflation in Denver metro area at 6.9%
““The primary causes of this change are nominal decreases in the prices of household fuels and transportation (driven largely by a decrease in the price of motor vehicle fuel since July) and slower rates of growth of other prices, like food and beverages,” said an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank in Colorado.”
Washington Examiner: December 15, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Housing affordability the key to quality workforce | OPINION
“According to the Common Sense Institute (CSI), home affordability since 2015 is 86% lower, meaning that it’s almost twice as expensive to buy a home. Redfin reports the median price of a home in Douglas County is $665,000.”
Colorado Politics: December 15, 2022 by Amy Sherman
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Group urges Colorado to focus on essentials due to Inflation, possible recession
“Colorado needs to prioritize essential issues and return to principles of free enterprise, according to the 2023 edition of the “Colorado Free Enterprise Report,” by the Common Sense Institute.”
The Center Square: December 15, 2022 by Joe Mueller
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Inflation in Denver metro area at 6.9%
““The primary causes of this change are nominal decreases in the prices of household fuels and transportation (driven largely by a decrease in the price of motor vehicle fuel since July) and slower rates of growth of other prices, like food and beverages,” said an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank in Colorado.”
The Center Square: December 15, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Free enterprise will let Colorado achieve its potential | PODIUM
“In the new Common Sense Institute (CSI) Free Enterprise Report, we look ahead at the challenges and opportunities that will face our state in the coming year.”
Colorado Politics: December 13, 2022 by Evelyn Lim
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Colorado think tank sees economic perils ahead, argues for free market approach to challenges
“The new report by the Common Sense Institute paints both an optimistic and foreboding future, noting that Colorado’s employment growth ranks among the top 10 states in the country but that perils persist in the form of slowing migration, which could mean insufficient workforce, rising inflation and the possibility of a recession.”
Colorado Politics: December 13, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
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EDITORIAL: Polis presides over a growing government

The Denver Gazette: December 13, 2022 by
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Colorado appropriating over $6,300 per capita in 2023
“The state appropriated $6,333 per Coloradan in fiscal year 2023, up from $4,955 20 years ago, according to the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank.”
MSN: December 12, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Colorado appropriating over $6,300 per capita in 2023
“The state appropriated $6,333 per Coloradan in fiscal year 2023, up from $4,955 20 years ago, according to the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank.”
Washington Examiner: December 12, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Driven by union-related spending, Colorado government keeps growing | COVER STORY
“Spending by Colorado’s state government has been expanding for the last 20 years, according to the Common Sense Institute, which released a report Thursday showing that total state appropriations per Coloradan, as adjusted for inflation, grew by 28% over the last 20 years from $4,955 to $6,333 in fiscal year 2023.”
Colorado Politics: December 12, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
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How Colorado’s budget has grown in 20 years
“Colorado has never had a larger budget, according to an analysis of previous budgets by the Common Sense Institute, a non-partisan free market think tank. The Centennial State’s total appropriations for the 2023 fiscal year come to $37.4 billion.”
KDVR Fox 31: December 12, 2022 by DJ Summers
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Colorado appropriating over $6,300 per capita in 2023
“The state appropriated $6,333 per Coloradan in fiscal year 2023, up from $4,955 20 years ago, according to the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank.”
The Center Square: December 9, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Colorado spending averages over $6,300 per person in 2023
“The state appropriated $6,333 per Coloradan in fiscal year 2023, up from $4,955 20 years ago, according to the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank.”
Kiowa County Press: December 9, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Colorado workers to see state-run paid leave deductions from paychecks starting January
“A study done by the Common Sense Institute found that FAMLI is likely to go bankrupt in just its second year of claim eligibility.The report says the direct costs of the program have not yet been fully explored.”
Axios: December 8, 2022 by Sherrie Peif
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Colorado car thefts are soaring and growing more dangerous
“The estimated value of stolen vehicles this year totals between $468.1 million and $848.3 million, per a Common Sense Institute report from September. State of play: Arrests aren’t keeping up with the state’s vehicular robbery rate, data shows. In the first six months of the year, Colorado’s arrest rate per motor vehicle theft was 9.4%, down from 15.5% in 2019, according to the Common Sense Institute.”
Complete Colorado: December 8, 2022 by Alayna Alvarez
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Pueblo Police Department sounding the alarm about ‘puffer’ thefts
“Pueblo is one of the top 10 cities in the country for auto theft per capita, according to a report from the Common Sense Institute, a “non-partisan research organization dedicated to the protection and promotion of Colorado’s economy.”
The Pueblo Chieftain: December 5, 2022 by Justin Reutter 
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2022 | November

Target 7 Investigates: Is there a safe space?
“In a report by the Common Sense Institute and by the Metro Denver Homeless Initiative, the homeless population in Metro Denver has risen to its highest number since 2012.”
KOAT Action News: November 24, 2022 by
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Urban Creep is Changing Parker; but is it for the better?
“However, motor vehicle theft–as well as vehicle break-ins–may be the most shocking statistic. According to a 2022 report by Common Sense Institute, Colorado now leads the nation in motor vehicle thefts after an increase of more than 32% in 2022 over the previous year. This has been a change I’ve felt personally.”
News Break: November 23, 2022 by
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Insurance savings from Colorado Option ‘hypothetical,’ think tank says
“In a report, the Common Sense Institute, a free enterprise think tank, said the $294 million in savings — out of the $326 million touted by the administration — is already accounted for via Colorado’s reinsurance program, which has been in place since 2020 and which impacts only the individual market, not the small group market.”
The Gazette: November 20, 2022 by
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Insurance savings from Colorado Option ‘hypothetical,’ think tank says
“In a report, the Common Sense Institute, a free enterprise think tank, said the $294 million in savings — out of the $326 million touted by the administration — is already accounted for via Colorado’s reinsurance program, which has been in place since 2020 and which impacts only the individual market, not the small group market.”
Denver Gazette: November 19, 2022 by
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Colorado’s unemployment rate up to 3.6% last month, but still under national rate
“An analysis by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, noted the state’s ‘population-adjusted employment recovered to its pre-pandemic level for the first time.'”
Kiowa County Press: November 19, 2022 by
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October mystery: Colorado hiring surges, but unemployment rate also rises
“Steven Byers, a senior economist with the Common Sense Institute in Denver, describes the divergence as paradoxical. Hiring wasn’t tepid, so why did more people say they were unemployed? “This may have an explanation such as people holding down more than one job or this will be corrected as the numbers are revised,” he said in an analysis of Friday’s report. One reason people may be taking on second jobs is to cope with inflation at a 40-year high.”
Greeley Tribune: November 19, 2022 by
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Brauchler 11-18-22 HR 3
“An analysis by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, noted the state’s ‘population-adjusted employment recovered to its pre-pandemic level for the first time.'”Guest: Chris Brown – Vice President of Policy & Research at Common Sense Institute Colorado 

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Colorado’s unemployment rate up to 3.6% last month, but still under national rate
“An analysis by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, noted the state’s ‘population-adjusted employment recovered to its pre-pandemic level for the first time.'”Guest: Chris Brown – Vice President of Policy & Research at Common Sense Institute Colorado 

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Colorado’s unemployment rate up to 3.6% last month, but still under national rate
“An analysis by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, noted the state’s ‘population-adjusted employment recovered to its pre-pandemic level for the first time.'”
Denver Post: November 18, 2022 by
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October mystery: Colorado hiring surges, but unemployment rate also rises
“Steven Byers, a senior economist with the Common Sense Institute in Denver, describes the divergence as paradoxical. Hiring wasn’t tepid, so why did more people say they were unemployed? “This may have an explanation such as people holding down more than one job or this will be corrected as the numbers are revised,” he said in an analysis of Friday’s report. One reason people may be taking on second jobs is to cope with inflation at a 40-year high.”
Denver Post: November 18, 2022 by
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Adopt higher temperature threshold that triggers emergency shelter, Denver housing advocates argue
“In a recent report, the Common Sense Institute said local governments and nonprofits are on track to spend nearly $2 billion over a three-year period to tackle homelessness in some counties in the Denver metro area. Critics called that study “purposefully misleading.” The explosive projected growth in spending from 2021 through 2023 reflects the gravity of the challenge that the public and private sectors face as they struggle to contain homelessness in Colorado’s biggest cities. Indeed, the study from the Common Sense Institute said the number of homeless people grew by double digits from 2020 to 2022 – levels unseen since 2008 for one specific population.”
Colorado Politics: November 16, 2022 by
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Denver City Council approves $1.66 billion budget for 2023
“In a report, the Common Sense Institute said local governments and nonprofits are on track to spend nearly $2 billion over a three-year period to tackle homelessness in some counties in the Denver metro area. Critics called that study ‘purposefully misleading.'”
The Denver Gazette: November 14, 2022 by
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Denver City Council approves $1.66 billion budget for 2023
“In a report, the Common Sense Institute said local governments and nonprofits are on track to spend nearly $2 billion over a three-year period to tackle homelessness in some counties in the Denver metro area. Critics called that study ‘purposefully misleading.'”
The Denver Gazette: November 14, 2022 by
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GUEST COLUMN: Water for Colorado’s 21st century economy
“Our goals when we accepted the challenge as 2022 Terry J. Stevenson Fellows at the Common Sense Institute were to work collaboratively, navigate our differences, and offer a joint paper that examines the issues facing Colorado’s future water supply and offer achievable solutions. Our report: “Adapting Colorado’s Water Systems for a 21st Century Economy and Water Supply,” was just released this week, and in line with the nature of the fellowship, offers six calls for collaborative action: Colorado will have to do more with less water; reducing the competition for water will require more regional cooperation and planning to manage, share, and reuse existing water supplies.”
Denver Gazette: November 9, 2022 by
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Colorado income tax cut measure wins big
“The Affordable Housing measure comes at a time when Colorado is facing a housing shortage. An analysis by the Common Sense Institute estimates that the state’s housing deficit is between 25,077 and 116,907 units.”
Kiowa County Press: November 9, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Colorado homeowners misery index rising as cost of purchasing a home doubled in 7 years
“The cost to purchase a Colorado home has doubled in the last 7 years, leading the affordability index to be the lowest it has been in 33 years, according to the Common Sense Institute’s most recent report. The median home price in Colorado is currently $580,275 with a 30-year mortgage rate of 5.22%, according to the report.”
Denver Gazette: November 8, 2022 by
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No such thing as a free lunch
“The proponents of Prop FF are certainly well intentioned, but there could be several unintended consequences if this measure passes. According to their 2022 Ballot Guide, the nonpartisan research think tank The Common Sense Institute suggests there’s a real risk that funding for the program will be much higher than necessary. Their estimates show that in only 10 years, in 2033, surplus revenues could be as high as $1.02 billion. Those surplus revenues will never be returned to taxpayers. It would go to the General Fund — where it could be spent on anything the legislature wants.”
The Daily Sentinel: November 6, 2022 by Michael Fields
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Colorado Voters to Decide Whether All Schoolkids Get a Free Lunch  
“The Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan free-market think tank, analyzed the measure and raised several concerns, with modeling that showed it could be underfunded or raise more money than is needed.”
PBS News Hour: November 6, 2022
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Colorado Voters to Decide Whether All Schoolkids Get a Free Lunch  
The Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan free-market think tank, analyzed the measure and raised several concerns, with modeling that showed it could be underfunded or raise more money than is needed. ‘There needs to be some good oversight on the program so that costs are managed well, and also that they don’t develop a huge surplus,’ said Steven Byers, the group’s senior economist.”
KHN: November 3, 2022 by
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Unaffordability in Colorado’s housing market ‘remains elevated,’ analysis says  
“The analysis from the Common Sense Institute found that while home prices in the state have decreased by 3% since May, mortgage rates are up by 32%. That’s caused the Colorado Homebuyer Misery Index, which CSI calculates to measure new home affordability, to remain elevated around 190, which is up from the 130s range in 2019.”
Kiowa County Press: November 3, 2022 by
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Unaffordability in Colorado’s housing market ‘remains elevated,’ analysis says  
“The analysis from the Common Sense Institute found that while home prices in the state have decreased by 3% since May, mortgage rates are up by 32%. That’s caused the Colorado Homebuyer Misery Index, which CSI calculates to measure new home affordability, to remain elevated around 190, which is up from the 130s range in 2019.”
The Center Square: Colorado: November 3, 2022 by
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Spate of violent crime unnerves Colorado’s business community  
“Rising crime plagues metro Denver, with numbers that are among the worst in the country. Car theft in Denver, for example, is second highest in the nation, and three other Colorado cities rank in the Top 10, according to a study by the Common Sense Institute. Car thefts are on track to exceed 48,000 this year, while include arson, robbery and vandalism also continue to spike, said the study, which cited FBI statistics.”
The Denver Gazette: November 3, 2022 by
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Colorado Voters to Decide Whether All Schoolkids Get a Free Lunch  
The Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan free-market think tank, analyzed the measure and raised several concerns, with modeling that showed it could be underfunded or raise more money than is needed. ‘There needs to be some good oversight on the program so that costs are managed well, and also that they don’t develop a huge surplus,’ said Steven Byers, the group’s senior economist.”
KHN: November 3, 2022 by
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Swift action needed in Colorado’s water stewardship: Panel  
“Projections by the Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan policy think tank, show that Prop 121 would also add jobs to Colorado’s economy. The dynamic impact of tax savings in 2023 would be an estimated additional 9,110 jobs.”
Colorado Politics: November 3, 2022 by Michael Fields
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Swift action needed in Colorado’s water stewardship: Panel  
“A discussion hosted by The Common Sense Institute Wednesday centered on the future of water usage in Colorado and featured key findings in a new report. Kristin Strohm, the President and CEO of the Common Sense Institute (CSI), along with Terry J. Stevinson fellows Jennifer Gimbel and Eric Kuhn, discussed the findings the report that contains an overview of water challenges in Colorado, recommendations for state agency, legislative, regional and local actions, and an analysis of economic dynamics for water future.”
The Denver Gazette: November 2, 2022 by Kyla Pearce
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Colorado Springs senator said law he backed has unintended consequences adding to car thefts  
“Last week, the Common Sense Institute released Homelessness in Metro Denver: An Opportunity to Transform Resources & the Existing System. The study quantifies the resources dedicated to addressing homelessness in the Denver Metro region. CSI has taken on this issue and sought to provide elected officials and citizens with the facts about the growing population of people experiencing homelessness and the increasing amount of resources we, as taxpayers and community members, are investing to help individuals experiencing homelessness.”
KRDO: November 1, 2022 by 
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2022 | October

PERSPECTIVE: The toll of homelessness  
“Last week, the Common Sense Institute released Homelessness in Metro Denver: An Opportunity to Transform Resources & the Existing System. The study quantifies the resources dedicated to addressing homelessness in the Denver Metro region. CSI has taken on this issue and sought to provide elected officials and citizens with the facts about the growing population of people experiencing homelessness and the increasing amount of resources we, as taxpayers and community members, are investing to help individuals experiencing homelessness.”
The Gazette: October 30, 2022 by
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Proposition 121’s Tax Decrease Would Likely Increase Taxes For Most Coloradans When The Economy Is Strong  
“Stephen Byers of Colorado’s Common Sense Institute says as far as adding a tax table to spell out how taxes would affect different income levels, he can see why people would want that.”
Aspen Public Radio: October 28, 2022 by
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Proposition 121’s Tax Decrease Would Likely Increase Taxes For Most Coloradans When The Economy Is Strong  
“Stephen Byers of Colorado’s Common Sense Institute says as far as adding a tax table to spell out how taxes would affect different income levels, he can see why people would want that.”
KGNU: October 27, 2022 by
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Proposition 123: A Fix for Colorado’s Affordable Housing Crisis?  
“Another critique of Proposition 123 comes from Peter Lifari, executive director of Maiker Housing Partners in Adams County, and Chris Brown, the vice president of policy and research for the conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute. Lifari and Brown penned an analysis for CSI looking at the measure and highlighted a loophole that allows local governments not to participate.”
Westword: October 27, 2022 by
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Colorado is seeing auto thefts on the rise  
“Colorado is starting to see more stolen cars. According to a recent study done by the Common Sense Institute, Colorado ranked no. 1 for the state with the most auto thefts last year.”
KOAA News5: October 26, 2022 by Caroline Peters
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Health insurance costs to increase next year as Polis camp touts ‘substantial savings’  
“Earlier this year, a report on the Colorado Option by the Common Sense Institute warned that if the program can’t keep up with inflation, ‘health care providers will likely be forced to choose between cutting services and passing on costs by raising prices for most insured Coloradans.’”
The Center Square: Colorado: October 26, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Evelyn Lim and Peter LiFari join KLZ 560 to discuss Colorado’s Housing Market
Common Sense Institute Housing Fellows, Evelyn Lim & Peter LiFari joined KLZ 560 to discuss Colorado’s housing market and ways to address impending issues.
KLZ 560 100.7FM.: October 25, 2022
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Routt GOP: Voters can restore balance in local, state, federal politics on Nov. 8 
“Rep. Roberts supported HB22-1326, the Fentanyl Accountability and Prevention bill, that simply adjusted the amount of illegal doses of fentanyl and did nothing to curb trafficking and prevent overdoses. Representative Roberts also supported SB-217, the Police Integrity Transparency and Accountability Act, which mandated onerous reporting processes that took police resources off the street. He also supported HB22-1362, Building Greenhouse Gas Emissions, which will require building code changes to comply with “green energy” mandates. According to the Common Sense Institute, these mandates will add about $42,000 to building costs for each new home in Colorado, making housing less affordable.”
Steamboat Pilot & Today: October 25, 2022 by Routt County Republican Central Committee
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New state board meets to create Colorado’s first statewide building codes  
“Concerned about the impact of the new requirements, the Common Sense Institute, a Denver-area think tank, issued a report in June that puts the incremental costs of the codes for each new residential build at between $6,450 and $22,352.”
The Gazette: October 25, 2022 by Scott Weiser
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New state board meets to create Colorado’s first statewide building codes 
“Concerned about the impact of the new requirements, the Common Sense Institute, a Denver-area think tank, issued a report in June that puts the incremental costs of the codes for each new residential build at between $6,450 and $22,352.”
The Gazette: October 25, 2022 by Scott Weiser
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Room for Improvement: No Eviction Without Representation on Denver Ballot
“Common Sense Solutions for Denver, the only registered opposition, has raised more than that, including $125,000 from the Apartment Association of Metro Denver. There are three main problems with the initiative, according to Drew Hamrick, general counsel and senior vice president of government affairs for that association. ‘It’s way, way, way too expensive,’ he says. ‘The revenue source and funding are not means-tested, so it has a very disproportionate impact on the lowest level of the economy. And, frankly, the program’s not necessary.'”
Denver Westword: October 25, 2022 by
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Colorado could become one of few states that pays for all student lunches. It’s up to voters
“The Common Sense Institute, a business-funded think tank, didn’t suggest voters support or oppose the measure. It did warn of uncertain revenue collections. The revenue collected under the program would be exempt from collection caps typical under the Taxpayer Bill of Rights, meaning the state could keep any extra money, according to the Institute. Conversely, the program could also be jeopardized by under-collections.”
Greeley Tribune: October 24, 2022 by
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New state board meets to create Colorado’s first statewide building codes
“Concerned about the impact of the new requirements, the Common Sense Institute, which describes itself as a non-partisan research institute, issued a report in June that puts the incremental costs of the codes for each new residential build at between $6,450 and $22,352.”
Denver Gazette: October 24, 2022 by
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Dave Davia, Common Sense Institute on homeless initative; Is Biden marching us toward war in Ukraine
“There is a nonpartisan, common sense solution to homelessness, and Dave Davia of the Common Sense Institute joins Dan to discuss those plans and initiatives. Also, American troops are training on the Romanian-Ukrainian border – is Joe Biden preparing us for a march to war to save his failing Presidency?”
iHeart Radio: October 24, 2022
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Brauchler 10-25-22 7am
“Ballots have arrived. The candidates are easy but what about those ballot measures? George welcome Michael Fields from Advanced Colorado and they walk through the who, what, and why of each ballot issue. Who pus this forward? What will it do if passed? Why is this an issue?”
710 KNUS: The George Brauchler Show: October 6, 2022 by
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Denver Gazette: More funding, more homeless — go figure
“The compassion of Coloradans knows no bounds when it comes to the homeless. An eye-opening study released Friday by Colorado think tank Common Sense Institute has concluded that more than $1.7 billion will be spent combating homelessness over three years — from 2021 through next year — a staggering increase in funding.”Ballots have arrived. The candidates are easy but what about those ballot measures? George welcome Michael Fields from Advanced Colorado and they walk through the who, what, and why of each ballot issue. Who pus this forward? What will it do if passed? Why is this an issue? 
Denver Gazette: October 24, 2022 by
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Almost $2 billion allocated to tackle homelessness in metro Denver over 3 years, study says
“The explosive projected growth in spending from 2021 through 2023 reflects the gravity of the challenge that the public and private sectors face as they struggle to contain homelessness in Colorado’s biggest cities. Indeed, the study from the Common Sense Institute said the number of homeless people grew by double digits from 2020 to 2022 – levels unseen since 2008 for one specific population.”
Denver Gazette: October 21, 2022 by Jessica Gibs
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‘We had a trailer full of our belongings’: local resident has trailer stolen
“COLORADO SPRINGS — Colorado has seen a recent increase in crime. According to the Commonsense Institute, Colorado ranks no. 1 in motor theft and no. 2 in crimes against property.”
KOAA News: Southern Colorado: October 20, 2022 by Caroline Peters
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Water conference to discuss adapting to conditions
“The session, “Adapting Colorado’s Water Systems for a 21st Century Water Supply and Economy” will be hosted by the Common Sense Institute, the Community Foundation of Northern Colorado and the Fort Collins Area Chamber of Commerce.”
Reporter Herald: October 20, 2022 by
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Ordinance 305 misses the forest for the trees
“At the Common Sense Institute, we had a similar analysis using historical rates of evictions. In addition to collecting more than can reasonably be spent to cover the costs for eviction defense, the measure does not include any provisions to reduce the tax on landlords to ensure that the total taxes collected remains in-line with costs. Without a way to right-size the program, the reserve will continue to grow, putting undue burdens on both landlords and renters who will undoubtedly pay for the new tax through increased rents and larger security deposits.”
Colorado Politics: October 19, 2022 by
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Alleged family car theft ring busted, six arrested for over 50 counts of alleged crime
“Car thefts in Colorado are expected to exceed 48,000, according to a 2022 Common Sense Institute study using FBI and CBI data. The institute is a non-partisan research organization that focuses on the economy.”
The Denver Gazette: October 19, 2022 by Alex Edwards
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Water conference to discuss adapting to conditions
“The session, “Adapting Colorado’s Water Systems for a 21st Century Water Supply and Economy” will be hosted by the Common Sense Institute, the Community Foundation of Northern Colorado and the Fort Collins Area Chamber of Commerce.”
BizWest: October 19, 2022 by
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Common Sense Institute: Top Company 2022 Finalist (Nonprofits)
Congratulations to Common Sense Institute, a finalist in this year’s Top Company award for the Nonprofits sector! Find the full list of winners at www.cobizmag.com/top-companies-2022/”
Colorado Biz Magazine: October 18, 2022
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Proposition 121: Should Colorado cut its income tax rate again?
“Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research for the business-focused Common Sense Institute, also noted that Proposition 121 would not reduce state spending over its first two years of enactment because of projected TABOR refunds. He estimated the tax break could lead to the creation of 9,600 jobs over the next five years — 9,100 in the private sector and 500 in the government sector.”
Denver Business Journal: October 18, 2022 by
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Universal free lunch for Colorado’s public school students? Voters will decide
“The Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan free-market think tank analyzed the measure and raised several concerns.According to the group’s ballot guide, if all Colorado public school authorities take part, an additional 615,000 students will now become eligible to get free meals, a rise of 125 percent.”
Colorado Public Radio: October 18, 2022 by
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Colorado Attorney General candidate John Kellner pledges to lower ‘unprecedented’ crime
“A study by the Common Sense Institute finds crime in Colorado has risen in recent years in the areas of arson, drug possession, motor vehicle theft, prostitution, purchase of stolen property, robbery and vandalism.”
Akron News Reporter: October 17, 2022 by
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Colorado Attorney General candidate John Kellner pledges to lower ‘unprecedented’ crime
“A study by the Common Sense Institute finds crime in Colorado has risen in recent years in the areas of arson, drug possession, motor vehicle theft, prostitution, purchase of stolen property, robbery and vandalism.”
Journal Advocate: October 17, 2022 by
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Colorado Attorney General candidate John Kellner pledges to lower ‘unprecedented’ crime
“A study by the Common Sense Institute finds crime in Colorado has risen in recent years in the areas of arson, drug possession, motor vehicle theft, prostitution, purchase of stolen property, robbery and vandalism.”
The Fort Morgan Times: October 17, 2022 by
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Gov. Jared Polis wants a second term as Colorado’s governor: What you need to know
“Republican critics argue that Polis oversaw enormous growth in Colorado’s government. Over the last four years, the state government has added nearly 4,000 full-time employees, an increase of about 6 percent, according to data from the Common Sense Institute. The largest numbers of those new employees went to the state’s veterans affairs agency, higher education and public health. In that same time, the state’s total full-time workforce — including private employers — has grown at about 3.6 percent.”
Colorado Public Radio: October 17, 2022 by
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Denver Initiated Ordinance 305: Should landlords be taxed to pay for free legal representation for tenants facing eviction?
“The conservative-leaning nonpartisan Common Sense Institute acknowledged that legal defense for tenants could reduce homelessness and associated costs. But the group argues the measure would raise more money than would be needed to provide universal eviction defense. The city already offers eviction defense services and rent and utility payment aid to people who income-qualify, making this measure redundant.”
Denverite: October 17, 2022 by Kyle Harris
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Proposition FF: Healthy meals for all public school students, explained
“Additionally, the Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan free-market think tank analyzed the measure and raised several concerns.”
Colorado Public Radio: October 17, 2022 by
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Inflation drops slightly in Denver area
”An analysis of BLS data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, estimates that Colorado households spent $1,685 more in August and September because of inflation.”
Washington Examiner: October 16, 2022 by
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Here’s how inflation looked for the Denver area from July to September
An analysis of BLS data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, estimates that Colorado households spent $1,685 more in August and September because of inflation.”
News Center 1: October 15, 2022 by Center Square
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Food boxes distributed to combat effects of pandemic, inflation
“According to the Consumer Price Index, people living in the Denver metro area are paying 7.7% more for goods and services. Even though that is lower than the national average of 8.2%, the average Coloradan has spent over $9,000 on food, housing, transportation, and medical care since 2020, according to the Common Sense Institute.”
CBS Colorado: October 15, 2022 by Justin Adams
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What’s Working: Denver inflation slows to 7.7%, which is still historically high
“Steven L. Byers, senior economist at the conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute, put it this way: The average Colorado household spent $1,685 more in August and September because of inflation. That’s an extra $111 a month on food, $231 on housing and $68 on medical care for an average of $843 more per month.”
Colorado Sun: October 15, 2022 by Tamara Chuang
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Inflation in Colorado drops below national level — but remains high
“The average Colorado household has spent $9,207 more on food, housing, transportation and medical care since 2020, per a report from senior economist Steven Byers at the conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute.”
Axios Denver: October 14, 2022 by Alayna Alvarez
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Report: Colorado’s crime rate down from last year, but still above pre-pandemic levels
“Colorado’s crime rate so far this year is down from last year, but still above pre-pandemic levels, a new report by the Common Sense Institute says. The state’s monthly crime rate average through June 2022 is 530 crimes per 100,000 residents, down from 583.7 last year, according to the think tank’s report.”
The Chronicle: October 14, 2022
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Inflation drops slightly in Denver area
”An analysis of BLS data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, estimates that Colorado households spent $1,685 more in August and September because of inflation.”
The Center Square: Colorado: October 13, 2022 by
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Colorado Voters asked to fund school lunches with tax on high incomes
“While little organized opposition to Proposition FF exists, several conservative groups have expressed skepticism about the proposal. The Common Sense Institute, a right-leaning think tank funded by business interests, questioned whether the new free-meals program would be ”overfunded or underfunded depending on cost and revenue outcomes into the future.”
Missoula Current: October 12, 2022 by Chase Woodruff
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Voters asked to fund school lunches with tax on high incomes
“While little organized opposition to Proposition FF exists, several conservative groups have expressed skepticism about the proposal. The Common Sense Institute, a right-leaning think tank funded by business interests, questioned whether the new free-meals program would be ”overfunded or underfunded depending on cost and revenue outcomes into the future.”
Montrose Daily Press: October 11, 2022 by Chase Woodruff Colorado Newsline
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POINT/COUNTERPOINT: How can we improve the education system?
“A recent report from Colorado’s Common Sense Institute finds metro Denver to be among the nation’s worst venues for soaring crime rates. Colorado ranks first in motor vehicle theft in the country, with multiple cases of car thieves using those stolen vehicles to commit other crimes, and then stealing yet another car to commit more crimes. All this while they’re released on bail — or without!”
The Gazette: October 12, 2022 by Mike Rosen
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POINT/COUNTERPOINT: How can we improve the education system?
“A recent report from Colorado’s Common Sense Institute finds metro Denver to be among the nation’s worst venues for soaring crime rates. Colorado ranks first in motor vehicle theft in the country, with multiple cases of car thieves using those stolen vehicles to commit other crimes, and then stealing yet another car to commit more crimes. All this while they’re released on bail — or without!”
The Gazette: October 12, 2022 by Mike Rosen
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Colorado Voters asked to fund school lunches with tax on high incomes
“While little organized opposition to Proposition FF exists, several conservative groups have expressed skepticism about the proposal. The Common Sense Institute, a right-leaning think tank funded by business interests, questioned whether the new free-meals program would be ”overfunded or underfunded depending on cost and revenue outcomes into the future.”
Pagosa Daily Press: October 11, 2022 by Chase Woodruff Colorado Newsline
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Voters asked to fund school lunches with tax on high incomes
“While little organized opposition to Proposition FF exists, several conservative groups have expressed skepticism about the proposal. The Common Sense Institute, a right-leaning think tank funded by business interests, questioned whether the new free-meals program would be ”overfunded or underfunded depending on cost and revenue outcomes into the future.”
Montrose Daily Press: October 11, 2022 by Chase Woodruff Colorado Newsline
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Missing Teenager Found Safe + Auto Thefts Fueled By Housing Shortage
“Lack of housing and drug addiction fueling Colorado’s high number of auto thefts. The Common Sense Institute’s study shows that the link between homelessness and drug addiction are what has fueled the high number of car thefts in Colorado. Jefferson County Drug Court has been working to helpful address the needs of repeats offenders by providing housing and money.”
Patch: October 11, 2022 by Brad K. Evans
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Criminal Reformers On The Ballot As Denver’s Crime Rates Soar
“Over the past two years, violent crime rates are up 17 percent. Colorado now has the highest auto theft rate in the nation, and the surrounding cities of Aurora, Pueblo, and Westminster all rank in the top 10 of 167 American cities, according to data compiled by the Common Sense Institute using publicly available reports.”
Forbes: October 11, 2022 by Chris Dorsey
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POINT/COUNTERPOINT: How can we improve the education system?
“According to a recent examination of the data by the Common Sense Institute, while Colorado has seen a 25% increase in students and a 36% increase in teachers, it has also seen a whopping 132% increase in administrators. Looking deeper, we see that teacher salaries have decreased as a percentage of a school district’s budget, further illustrating that classroom instruction has not been the highest priority of those at the helm.”
The Gazette: October 11, 2022 by
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Tipper Nominated For Top Spot + Metro Denver Tops Porch Pirate List
“The Common Sense Institute’s study shows that the link between homelessness and drug addiction are what has fueled the high number of car thefts in Colorado. Jefferson County Drug Court has been working to helpful address the needs of repeats offenders by providing housing and money.”
Patch: October 11, 2022 by Brad K. Evans
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Colorado voters asked to fund school lunches with tax hike on high incomes
“The Common Sense Institute, a Greenwood Village-based non-profit focused on economic research, found Colorado to be the top state in America for auto thefts in a study published Sept. 8, and four Colorado cities rank in the top ten in the United States. Those cities are Denver, Aurora, Westminster and Pueblo.”
Colorado Newsline: October 11, 2022 by Chase Woodruff
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Housing, drug addiction prove to be root of motor vehicle thefts
“The Common Sense Institute, a Greenwood Village-based non-profit focused on economic research, found Colorado to be the top state in America for auto thefts in a study published Sept. 8, and four Colorado cities rank in the top ten in the United States. Those cities are Denver, Aurora, Westminster and Pueblo.”
Douglas County News Press: October 10, 2022 by Luke Zarzecki
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Housing, drug addiction prove to be root of motor vehicle thefts
“The Common Sense Institute, a Greenwood Village-based non-profit focused on economic research, found Colorado to be the top state in America for auto thefts in a study published Sept. 8, and four Colorado cities rank in the top ten in the United States. Those cities are Denver, Aurora, Westminster and Pueblo.”
Courier: October 10, 2022 by Luke Zarzecki
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Housing, drug addiction prove to be root of motor vehicle thefts
“The Common Sense Institute, a Greenwood Village-based non-profit focused on economic research, found Colorado to be the top state in America for auto thefts in a study published Sept. 8, and four Colorado cities rank in the top ten in the United States. Those cities are Denver, Aurora, Westminster and Pueblo.”
Brighton Standard Blade: October 10, 2022 by Luke Zarzecki
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Colorado Inside Out
“The Colorado Inside Out Panel meets at the Tattered Cover. Host: Krista Kafer Panelist: Kwame Spearman George Brauchler Patricia Calhoun Chris Rourke Topics Include: • US Historical Site Sand Creek Expanded • Mayor Hancock Requests Record Money for Police, Fire and Jail Services in 2023 Budget Proposal • 3rd Congressional District Race • Dominion Voting Saga”
PBS12: October 7, 2022
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LETTERS: Very different time and place; approach has been too liberal
“Second, as justification for several of Brauchler’s points, he cites two reports by the Common Sense Institute on crime as justifying his conclusions. But did Brauchler’s column disclose that he is a fellow for that Institute? And did Brauchler’s column disclose that he himself actually authored both of these reports? No on both counts. Go to the CSI website. Brauchler’s name, title, and picture is right there on the CSI staff and team webpage. And look at the CSI reports, also on the CSI webpage.”
The Gazette: October 7, 2022 by Denver Gazette Readers
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Report on crime in Colorado raises flags among criminal justice reform advocates
“A new report on crime in Colorado for the first half of 2022 shows some disturbing trends. A closer look at the data and the organization that published it has raised flags among criminal justice reform organizations.The conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute released a new study that details certain crimes for the first six months of 2022.”
CBS Colorado: October 6, 2022 by Austen Erblat 
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Brauchler 10-6-22 9am
“Kelly Caufield the new Executive Director for the Common Sense Institute starts the hour. Then George talks to the head of the Colorado GOP, Kristi Burton Brown about state lawmaker Ron Hanks backing down from his promise to support the GOP nominee if he lost the primary.”
710 KNUS: The George Brauchler Show: October 6, 2022 by
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Support for Prop FF sought School Meals for All on the Nov. 8 ballot
There is a risk of underfunding, according to assessments of the proposed program. The Common Sense Institute (CSI) cited inflation and other factors as challenges to avoid underfunding.“If costs are not carefully managed and revenues fall short of projections, the program could run a deficit as early as 2024 (between -$1.8 million and -$4.2 million), grow to $72.4 million in 2033, and deficit could grow as high as -$506 million by 2050,” the CSI report reads, in part.
Telluride Daily Planet: October 5, 2022 by
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Horrific crime stats emerge from Colorado
“The Common Sense Institute (CSI), a think-tank local to Colorado, reported at the beginning of October 2022 that the state’s cities have some of the highest crime rates in the nation. ‘Crime in Colorado in 2022: The Data on Colorado’s Increasing Crime Problem’ was authored by George Brauchler, Mitch Morrissey, and Steven Byers, Ph.D.”
American Thinker: October 5, 2022 by C.S. Boddie
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Denver Gazette: Denver’s politicians must account for crime
“As The Gazette reported Tuesday, Colorado’s Common Sense Institute released a new analysis this week detailing the crime tsunami that has inundated our state. The report’s numbers for the first half of this year for Denver and the surrounding area are especially troubling.”
Colorado Politics: October 5, 2022 by Timothy Hurst
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EDITORIAL: Denver’s politicians must account for crime
“As The Gazette reported Tuesday, Colorado’s Common Sense Institute released a new analysis this week detailing the crime tsunami that has inundated our state. The report’s numbers for the first half of this year for Denver and the surrounding area are especially troubling.”
The Denver Gazette: October 5, 2022 by Timothy Hurst
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Group finds growing concern with fentanyl, robbery, arson crime rates
“Crime rates across Colorado took center stage at a conference on Monday. The Common Sense Institute released a new study that details crime for the first 6 months of this year.”
CBS Colorado: October 4, 2022 by CBSColorado.com
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Republican gubernatorial candidate Heidi Ganahl wants to reduce regulation amid inflation and eliminate the state income tax
“Public health has so much more power right now than they did. And we still have an emergency order in place to give that power to public health, which I disagree with. So that’s one of the agencies [CSI] I would like to take a look at and see if we can’t reduce the scope and size of it and give more autonomy back to local municipalities.”
Colorado Public Radio: October 3, 2022 by
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Republican gubernatorial candidate Heidi Ganahl wants to reduce regulation amid inflation
“Republican gubernatorial candidate Heidi Ganahl wants to reduce regulation amid inflation.”
The Durango Herald: October 3, 2022
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Husband jailed for dealing fentanyl less than a month after his wife was busted on the same charges
“Crime rates across Colorado took center stage at a conference on Monday. The Common Sense Institute released a new study that details crime for the first 6 months of this year.”
FOX News: October 3, 2022 by Michael Lee
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The Dan Caplis Show (KHOW 650)
10-3-22 Interview – Fmr DA Mitch Morrissey on Common Sense Institute Report on Crime
The Dan Caplis Show: October 3, 2022 by Dan Caplis
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The Stefan Tubbs Show (KNUS, 710)
“We begin with news former President Trump and news he is suing CNN for nearly a half-billion dollars. He is seeking relief for defamation and being portrayed as Hitler as he ponders running in 2024. Then – more on The Common Sense Institute’s “Crime In Colorado In 2022” report and the sickeningly disgusting stats. Calls and texts. Terry Bradshaw announces he had cancer and is now cancer-free; soccer disaster in Java. And our film assignment this week – “Black Widow” from 1954. We’ll review this Friday evening with clips, trivia and more about 645pMT.”
The Steffan Tubbs Show: October 3, 2022 by Steffan Tubbs
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Group finds growing concern with fentanyl, robbery, arson crime rates
“Crime rates across Colorado took center stage at a conference on Monday. The Common Sense Institute released a new study that details crime for the first 6 months of this year.”
CBS Denver: October 4, 2022 by CBSColorado.com
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Report: Crime on the rise in Colorado
“Penalty reduction and decriminalization of a variety of crimes in Colorado have led to increased crime and less public safety, a report released Monday by the Common Sense Institute reads.”
Journal Advocate: October 3, 2022 by
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Plagued by crime, metro Denver is among the worst in America: CSI report
“Car theft in Denver is second highest in the nation, and three other Colorado cities rank in the Top 10, according to the Common Sense Institute, a free enterprise think tank.”
The Denver Gazette: October 3, 2022 by Alex Edwards 
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Report: Colorado’s crime rate down from last year, but still above pre-pandemic levels
“Colorado’s crime rate so far this year is down from last year, but still above pre-pandemic levels, a new report by the Common Sense Institute says.The state’s monthly crime rate average through June 2022 is 530 crimes per 100,000 residents, down from 583.7 last year, according to the think tank’s report. The rate was 522 in 2020 and 494.4 in 2019.”
The Sentinel: October 3, 2022
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Report: Colorado’s crime rate down from last year, but still above pre-pandemic levels
“Colorado’s crime rate so far this year is down from last year, but still above pre-pandemic levels, a new report by the Common Sense Institute says.The state’s monthly crime rate average through June 2022 is 530 crimes per 100,000 residents, down from 583.7 last year, according to the think tank’s report. The rate was 522 in 2020 and 494.4 in 2019.”
The Center Square: Colorado: October 3, 2022
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Colorado crime rates continue to rise, report says
“Data shared by local free enterprise think tank organization Common Sense Institute shows Denver and surrounding cities continue to record high crime rates.”
Yahoo! News: October 3, 2022 by Alex Edwards
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Colorado crime rates continue to rise, report says
“Data shared by local free enterprise think tank organization Common Sense Institute shows Denver and surrounding cities continue to record high crime rates.”
The Gazette: October 3, 2022 by Alex Edwards
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Report: Crime on the rise in Colorado
“Penalty reduction and decriminalization of a variety of crimes in Colorado have led to increased crime and less public safety, a report released Monday by the Common Sense Institute reads.”
The Fort Morgan Times: October 3, 2022 by
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GUEST COLUMN: Transportation plan is still unclear
“In late 2020, the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a non-partisan think tank, released A Path Forward: A Common Sense Strategy for the Continued Viability of Colorado’s Transportation Network. The study detailed the scope of the “unquiet crisis” plaguing Colorado’s transportation system.”
The Denver Gazette: October 2, 2022 by Dave Clark
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2022 Elections: What’s in your ballot?
Common Sense Institute ballot guide is featured focusing on Proposition FF- Healthy School Meals for All.
The Denver Gazette: October 1, 2022
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2022 | September

2022 Colorado General Election: What’s in your ballot?
Common Sense Institute ballot guide is featured focusing on Proposition FF- Healthy School Meals for All.
Colorado Politics: September 30, 2022
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2022 Elections: What’s in your ballot?
Common Sense Institute ballot guide is featured focusing on Proposition FF- Healthy School Meals for All.
Colorado Politics: September 30, 2022
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Kelly Caufield topped as Common Sense Institute Colorado’s new executive director
“‘In a time of growing divisiveness, centering more policy conversations around fact-based, objective data is critical to strengthening Colorado’s economic competitiveness.’ – Kelly Caulfield”
Villager: September 29, 2022
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Over 100 Colorado nonprofits back Prop FF for free school meals
“No organizations or committees have formally come out against the measure; however, the conservative-leaning research group the Common Sense Institute released an analysis claiming that Proposition FF is at risk of both underfunding and overfunding school meal programs, depending on future inflation rates and resident incomes.”
Colorado Politics: September 28, 2022 by Hannah Metzger
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Denver Gazette: YES to Prop. 121; cut Colorado’s income tax
“That’s also why each supports Proposition 121 on this fall’s mail ballot. It will reduce the state income tax rate for individuals and corporations from 4.55% to 4.40%. An analysis by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute found it will save taxpayers $767 million the first year after implementation.”
Colorado Politics: September 27, 2022 by the Denver Gazette Board
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Mile-high car thefts fuel Republicans seeking to unseat Polis in Colorado governor’s race
“Republican Heidi Ganahl, who is running to unseat Mr. Polis in November, pointed out that the Democrat signed Senate Bill 271 last year. The sweeping sentencing overhaul included a provision making it a misdemeanor to steal a car valued at less than $2,000.”
The Washington Times: September 27, 2022 by
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Colorado’s district attorneys push for new law to crack down on auto thieves
“Boggs car was stolen in Aurora which, according to a study by Common Sense Institute, is the third worst city in the country for stolen cars. It’s also the first in the state to impose mandatory jail time for auto theft.”
CBS Colorado: September 27, 2022 by Shaun Boyd 
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Handouts to homeless simply won’t help
“As a Common Sense Institute study detailed, the $70,000 per year we already spend on each individual experiencing homelessness could fund up to six students in K-12 education in Colorado. We need compassionate solutions for people who lack housing, but we don’t need temporary bandages. An unsustainable, “no-strings attached” program isn’t going to work because dumping more unaccountable money on a problem never does.”
The Gazette: September 27, 2022
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ENDORSEMENT: YES to Prop. 121; cut Colorado’s income tax
“That’s also why each supports Proposition 121 on this fall’s mail ballot. It will reduce the state income tax rate for individuals and corporations from 4.55% to 4.40%. An analysis by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute found it will save taxpayers $767 million the first year after implementation.”
The Denver Gazette: September 27, 2022
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(Opinion) Other Voices: The true cost of Colorado’s soaring car theft
“The pitfalls of the proposition, according to analysis from the Common Sense Institute, lie in the hands of local governments choosing not to opt into the fund, and letting the fund increase without building any new meaningful affordable housing.”
Denver Business Journal: September 27, 2022 by
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Colorado sees motor vehicle theft crisis: ‘Please tell me how a virus makes people commit more crimes’
“Colorado, ranked No. 1 in America for motor vehicle theft in 2021, continues to lead the nation this year in motor vehicle theft, Common Sense Institute said. “In the first six months of 2022 (January – June), the motor vehicle theft rate increased another 17.2%,” Common Sense Institute said.”
Centennial State News: September 27, 2022 by Tamara Browning
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Affordable housing hitting the Colorado ballot this November
“The pitfalls of the proposition, according to analysis from the Common Sense Institute, lie in the hands of local governments choosing not to opt into the fund, and letting the fund increase without building any new meaningful affordable housing.”
Denver Business Journal: September 26, 2022 by  
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Fields: Yes on Prop 121; the case for lowering Colorado’s income tax
“Projections by the Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan policy think tank, shows that Proposition #121 would save Colorado taxpayers at least $1.6 billion over the first 5 years after its passage. Simplifying the math, this is essentially because both 2022 and 2023 tax savings would be realized in 2023 without causing any corresponding reduction in the 2022 TABOR refund, which was already budgeted.”
Complete Colorado Page 2: September 26, 2022 by
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(Opinion) Other Voices: The true cost of Colorado’s soaring car theft
“Morrissey, a career-long prosecutor who’s now a criminal justice fellow at Colorado’s Common Sense Institute, co-wrote a new crime study on auto theft for the institute with former 18th Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler. Morrissey recaps the study’s findings in today’s essay, and he makes clear that the astounding rate at which cars and trucks are being stolen in our state is much more than just water-cooler talk or fodder for one-liners. It’s a gut punch.”
Greeley Tribune: September 24, 2022 by
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Coloradans are worried about housing. Here’s what Jared Polis and Heidi Ganahl say they’d do
“Asked how else she would incentivize innovative ideas, as she hopes to do, Ganahl said she would work with others to develop a plan. She said she was interested in the work of a group of CU architecture students who have been reimagining main streets, as well as a free market-focused think tank called the Common Sense Institute.”
The Colorado Sun: September 23, 2022 by
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State budget writers fear consequences of Colorado voters approving affordable housing ballot measure
“The state lawmakers who write Colorado’s budget are raising red flags about how two measures on the November ballot — one that would reduce the income tax rate and another that would set aside about $300 million annually for affordable housing — could combine to hamstring the legislature’s future finances, namely by eating into education funding.”
The Colorado Sun: September 23, 2022 by
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Common Sense Institute names Kelly Caufield as its new Colorado leader
“The Common Sense Institute tapped Kelly Caufield on Friday as executive director of the research organization’s Colorado branch. Denver-based Caufield will take the reins in Colorado as Kristin Strohm, the organization’s president and CEO, focuses on expanding the Common Sense Institute nationwide. Currently, the Common Sense Institute operates in Colorado and Arizona, with plans to launch in more states soon.”
Colorado Politics: September 23, 2022 by
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Coloradans are worried about housing. Here’s what Jared Polis and Heidi Ganahl say they’d do
“So they’re addressing that problem. They formally approved a plan to pay people $1,000/month to be vagrants. This is in addition to the $40,000 to $100,000 per year per vagrant that they’re already spending on vagrancy according to a non-partisan research organization.”
The Aspen Belt: September 23, 2022
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Coloradans are worried about housing. Here’s what Jared Polis and Heidi Ganahl say they’d do
“Asked how else she would incentivize innovative ideas, as she hopes to do, Ganahl said she would work with others to develop a plan. She said she was interested in the work of a group of CU architecture students who have been reimagining main streets, as well as a free market-focused think tank called the Common Sense Institute.”
Colorado Public Radio: September 23, 2022 by
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What’s really on voters’ minds? Inflation
“I commend the entire ‘Dollars and Data’ report from the Common Sense Institute to Colorado Politics readers, but will highlight a few points that stood out for me as I examined current conditions.”
The Gazette: September 22, 2022 by
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PODIUM | Education is trending in the wrong direction
“I commend the entire ‘Dollars and Data’ report from the Common Sense Institute to Colorado Politics readers, but will highlight a few points that stood out for me as I examined current conditions.”
Colorado Politics: September 21, 2022 by Jason Gaulden
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Jared Polis changes his tune
“The Common Sense Institute (CSI), followed by the main stream media, began reporting on Colorado’s historic surge in crime and its economic impact on Coloradans. Only then did government leaders begin to acknowledge what Colorado had been enduring for years. Today, our crime tsunami includes national rankings as No. 1 in car theft and bank robberies, and No. 2 in fentanyl overdoses.”
The Gazette: September 21, 2022 by
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Downtown Denver explores urban design as answer to crime
“Former district attorney Mitch Morrissey, a fellow at the Common Sense Institute, said the No. 1 thing that comes to mind when he thinks about improving the downtown’s safety is getting the police department staffed ‘up to the level it should be.'”
The Denver Gazette: September 20, 2022 by
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Will Coloradans risk hit to their TABOR checks for a new affordable housing program?
“Peter LiFari, the executive director of Maiker Housing Partners, called the equity-sharing provision “unique and inspirational” in an analysis for the Common Sense Institute, a free enterprise-focused think-tank. He said in a subsequent interview that it’d be the largest and most ambitious such program in the country, a “transformative” way for renters to build equity.”
Summit Daily: September 20, 2022 by
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Will Coloradans risk hit to their TABOR checks for a new affordable housing program?
“Peter LiFari, the executive director of Maiker Housing Partners, called the equity-sharing provision “unique and inspirational” in an analysis for the Common Sense Institute, a free enterprise-focused think-tank. He said in a subsequent interview that it’d be the largest and most ambitious such program in the country, a “transformative” way for renters to build equity.”
The Lamar Ledger: September 20, 2022 by
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Will Coloradans risk hit to their TABOR checks for a new affordable housing program?
“Peter LiFari, the executive director of Maiker Housing Partners, called the equity-sharing provision “unique and inspirational” in an analysis for the Common Sense Institute, a free enterprise-focused think-tank. He said in a subsequent interview that it’d be the largest and most ambitious such program in the country, a “transformative” way for renters to build equity.”
Denver Post: September 20, 2022 by
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GenXYZ 2022: Finalists (11-15)
“As co-founder (and now president & CEO) of Common Sense Institute, Kristin Strohm is guided by the belief that when people have solid information, they are more likely to make sound choices.”
ColoradoBiz Magazine: September 19, 2022 by
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Denver Gazette: The true cost of Colorado’s soaring car theft
“Morrissey, a career-long prosecutor who’s now a criminal justice fellow at Colorado’s Common Sense Institute, co-wrote a new crime study on auto theft for the institute with former 18th Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler. Morrissey recaps the study’s findings in today’s essay, and he makes clear that the astounding rate at which cars and trucks are being stolen in our state is much more than just water-cooler talk or fodder for one-liners. It’s a gut punch.”
Colorado Politics: September 19, 2022 by
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CSI Prop 123 report
The Gazette: September 18, 2022 by
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EDITORIAL: The true cost of Colorado’s soaring car theft
“Morrissey, a career-long prosecutor who’s now a criminal justice fellow at Colorado’s Common Sense Institute, co-wrote a new crime study on auto theft for the institute with former 18th Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler. Morrissey recaps the study’s findings in today’s essay, and he makes clear that the astounding rate at which cars and trucks are being stolen in our state is much more than just water-cooler talk or fodder for one-liners. It’s a gut punch.”
The Gazette: September 18, 2022 by
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Brauchler 9-16-22 7am
“Gov. Polis again takes a position 180 degrees away from his previous position. This time it’s about Auto Theft. George outlies how Polis, in an election year, is switching his position to look tough on crime.”
710 KNUS: The George Brauchler Show: September 16, 2022 by
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Thornton police ramping up auto theft task force
“The Common Sense Institute found Colorado to be the top state in America for auto thefts in a study published Sept. 8, and four Colorado cities rank in the top ten in the United States. One of those cities is Westminster, ranking at 8. Thornton ranked at 21.”
The Westminster Window: September 16, 2022 by
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Hancock’s budget won’t stem homelessness | Jimmy Sengenberger
“Last year, a report from the Common Sense Institute revealed the Metro area’s public and nonprofit social safety net spends half a billion dollars each year on homelessness.”
The Denver Gazette: September 16, 2022 by
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Local governments’ participation is crucial to goals of $300 million ballot measure, analysis says
“Indeed, the proposal will only be as successful as the number of local governments that participate in it, the non-partisan Common Sense Institute says in a report the group released this week.”
The Denver Gazette: September 14, 2022 by
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READY, AIM, FIRE: Democrats Stole My Car  
“A new study released by the Common Sense Institute shows that Colorado is on track to set an all-time-high in motor vehicle thefts in 2022. By January 2022, Colorado was already #1 in the nation for auto theft.”
Pagosa Daily Post: September 14, 2022 by
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SENGENBERGER | Polis parody captures Hollywood’s nostalgia play  
“As someone whose car was stolen — twice — in 2020 and detailed the experience, I can attest to the disaster that is auto theft. It’s only gotten worse since then: a report last week from the Common Sense Institute concluded that Colorado leads the nation in stolen cars.”
Colorado Politics: September 14, 2022 by
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Grand Junction Daily Sentinel: School funding is out of whack  
“Over the last 14 years, Colorado’s funding per student has increased by 47% while the average teacher salary has only risen by 27%, according to reporting by ColoradoPolitics.com. This is based on the annual Dollars and Data Report from the Common Sense Institute.”
Colorado Politics: September 13, 2022 by
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EDITORIAL: We can’t keep treating our teachers like this  
“The 2022 ‘Dollars and Data’ report by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute documents and proves the tragic tale of education funding. As we increase K-12 spending, the money goes more to administration and bureaucracy than to instruction and teacher salaries.”
The Gazette: September 12, 2022 by
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Colorado Springs Gazette: We can’t keep treating our teachers like this  
“The 2022 ‘Dollars and Data’ report by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute documents and proves the tragic tale of education funding. As we increase K-12 spending, the money goes more to administration and bureaucracy than to instruction and teacher salaries.”
Colorado Politics: September 12, 2022 by
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Measure to slash Colorado’s income tax rate raises least amount but faces no formal opposition  
“In an August report, the nonpartisan, conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute said future refunds from the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights would offset the initial decline in state revenue from the ballot measure, allowing the state government to not reduce spending for the first two years. The institute also claimed that the measure would save taxpayers $767 million in 2023.”
The Gazette: September 11, 2022
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School funding is out of whack  
“Over the last 14 years, Colorado’s funding per student has increased by 47% while the average teacher salary has only risen by 27%, according to reporting by coloradopolitics.com. This is based on the annual Dollars and Data Report from the Common Sense Institute.”
The Daily Sentinel: September 11, 2022
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What’s Working: 44% of Colorado small businesses surveyed have put hiring on hold  
“’A lot of companies that were looking for (skilled labor), they’re not in a hurry to lay people off because there’s so much effort and cost to bring them back when the economy starts to rebound,’ said Steven Byers, senior economist with Common Sense Institute, a conservative think tank in Greenwood Village. ‘Right now, I think there’s so many job openings nationwide and in Colorado that I don’t see (hiring) dropping off.'”
The Colorado Sun: September 10, 2022 by
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Colorado’s Car Theft Rate Is Bad and Getting Worse!  
“‘It’s one of those things that we need to get a handle on,’ Mitch Morrissey, the former Denver district attorney, said during a September 8 press conference held by the conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute, which had just unveiled a new report on car theft.”
Westword: September 10, 2022 by
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Brauchler 9-9-22 8am
“Car Theft is out of control in Colorado. Former D.A. Mitch Morrissey joins George to explain nearly ONE BILLION DOLLARS in cars have been stolen in Colorado. Then George talks about the developments on the Mar-A-Lago Classified documents story.”
710 KNUS: The George Brauchler Show: September 9, 2022 by
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Four Colorado cities among top 10 US cities for vehicle thefts  
“According to a report published by Common Sense Institute, car thefts in Colorado currently occur at a rate of 4,007 per month, on pace for an all-time high of 48,000 over the course of the year. At that rate, it seems likely that Colorado we retain its spot as the number one state for car thefts in the country, following the state passing Washington DC in 2021.”
Out There Colorado: September 9, 2022 by
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‘Soft on crime’ policies in Colorado could mean $848M in stolen vehicles this year, report says  
“The report, compiled by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, found that the state is on pace to surpass a record 48,000 auto thefts this year, with a total value estimated to be between $468.1 million and $848.3 million.”
The Center Square Colorado: September 9, 2022 by
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Colorado education budget increases did not translate to higher teacher pay: Report 
“The annual Dollars and Data Report from the Common Sense Institute found that, over the past 14 years, Colorado’s funding per student has increased by 47% while the average teacher salary has only risen by 27%.”
The Gazette: September 9, 2022 by
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Colorado education budget increases did not translate to higher teacher pay: Report 
“The annual Dollars and Data Report from the Common Sense Institute found that, over the past 14 years, Colorado’s funding per student has increased by 47% while the average teacher salary has only risen by 27%.”
The Gazette: September 9, 2022 by
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Report: Education budget increases did not translate to higher teacher pay  
“Common Sense Institute, a Denver area think tank, summarized auto theft data in a webinar Thursday morning. The data showed one thing clearly: Denver is the most dangerous city for cars valued less than $25,000 (which make up 85.6% of car thefts).”
Colorado Politics: September 9, 2022 by
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Denver Gazette: Blink and your car is gone in Colorado  
“It looks like Colorado is on track for the second year in a row to claim the dubious title of No. 1 state for auto theft. That’s among the startling findings of the latest crime study released Thursday by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute.”
The Gazette: September 9, 2022 by
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Measure to slash Colorado’s income tax rate raises least amount but faces no formal opposition  
“In an August report, the nonpartisan, conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute said future refunds from the Taxpayer Bill of Rights would offset the initial decline in state revenue from the ballot measure, allowing the state government to not reduce spending for the first two years. The Institute also claimed that the measure would save taxpayers $767 million in 2023.”
Colorado Politics: September 9, 2022 by
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EDITORIAL: Blink and your car is gone in Colorado  
“It looks like Colorado is on track for the second year in a row to claim the dubious title of No. 1 state for auto theft. That’s among the startling findings of the latest crime study released Thursday by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute.”
The Gazette: September 9, 2022 by
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Colorado car thefts: ‘The stuff we’re doing if you’re gonna grade it, it’s an F.’  
“Common Sense Institute, a Denver area think tank, summarized auto theft data in a webinar Thursday morning. The data showed one thing clearly: Denver is the most dangerous city for cars valued less than $25,000 (which make up 85.6% of car thefts).”
The Denver Gazette: September 8, 2022 by
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What’s Working: Older Coloradans are returning to work, and inflation may be to blame  
“One group in particular is not just returning to work but growing faster than others: women. Particularly, women 55 and older, according to an analysis by Steven Byers, senior economist with Common Sense Institute, a conservative think tank in Greenwood Village.”
Post Independent: September 5, 2022 by
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New housing unit permits in Colorado down 20 percent last month  
“The analysis by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, found that a 0.28 percent decrease in home prices and a 5.3 percent average mortgage rate led to a 0.33 percent decline in the Colorado Homebuyer Misery Index, which CSI calculates to measure new home affordability.”
The Chronicle: September 5, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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The Deborah Flora Show
Deborah talks about how the falling confidence in Joe Biden is increasing national security risks and Common Sense Institute’s Chris Brown joins Deborah to decode Ballot initiates, crime, and outline common sense solutions.
710 KNUS: September 4, 2022
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Denver leaders reflect on Paul Pazen’s legacy as police chief  
“Mitch Morrissey, a former district attorney of the 2nd Judicial District and a fellow at the Common Sense Institute, said Pazen’s department dealt with violent attacks on state and city property during 2020 protests, significant spikes in crime rates and an “anti-law enforcement” mentality within the state legislature.”
The Denver Gazette: September 3, 2022 by
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Time for us to believe: Homelessness is solvable  
“A recent study by the Common Sense Institute found that Denver is spending more per homeless person every year than it does per student in its schools. And Denver’s not alone. Colorado’s chronically sheltered homeless population grew by 266% between 2007 and 2021, more than any other state, according to a recent report from the Department of Housing and Urban Development.”
The Gazette: September 3, 2022 by
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What’s Working: Older Coloradans are returning to work, and inflation may be to blame  
“One group in particular is not just returning to work but growing faster than others: women. Particularly, women 55 and older, according to an analysis by Steven Byers, senior economist with Common Sense Institute, a conservative think tank in Greenwood Village.”
The Colorado Sun: September 3, 2022 by
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Hillman column: Colorado is a mess; have voters had enough?  
“That report from Common Sense Institute connects the increase in crime to “social justice” legislation passed during the last four years, leading to:Declining prison population (down 23% since 2008); Increasing use of personal recognizance bonds — even in violent crime cases;Decriminalizing possession of four grams or less of Schedule II controlled substances, such as fentanyl, from a felony to a misdemeanor.”
Post Independent: September 1, 2022 by Mark Hillman
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2022 | August

Report warns that state’s housing deficit could grow even more  
“The Common Sense Institute released the August 2022 Colorado Housing Affordability Update earlier this month, with early signs in the housing market indicating a shift. Mortgage rates have moderated slightly this month, but many expect that they will continue to rise with inflation.”
Longmont Leader: August 31, 2022 by Amy Golden
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New housing unit permits in Colorado down 20 percent last month  
“The analysis by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, found that a 0.28 percent decrease in home prices and a 5.3 percent average mortgage rate led to a 0.33 percent decline in the Colorado Homebuyer Misery Index, which CSI calculates to measure new home affordability.”
The Center Square Colorado: August 28, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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New housing unit permits in Colorado down 20 percent last month  
“The analysis by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, found that a 0.28 percent decrease in home prices and a 5.3 percent average mortgage rate led to a 0.33 percent decline in the Colorado Homebuyer Misery Index, which CSI calculates to measure new home affordability.”
Kiowa County Press: August 28, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Today Colorado is a mess. Have voters had enough?
“That report from Common Sense Institute connects the increase in crime to “social justice” legislation passed during the last four years, leading to: Declining prison population (down 23% since 2008); Increasing use of personal-recognizance bonds even in violent crime cases; and Decriminalizing possession of four grams or less of Schedule II controlled substances, such as fentanyl, from a felony to a misdemeanor.”
Craig Press: August 25, 2022 by Mark Hillman
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Fields: Initiative 108 just another grab at taxpayer refunds
“Cost of living is too high in Colorado — including housing costs. According to the Common Sense Institute, the cost of purchasing a home has doubled in just the past seven years.”
Complete Colorado Page 2: August 25, 2022 by Michael Fields
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Colorado homeowners go big when it comes to size of home equity loans this year  
“The typical Colorado household has had to spend about $7,522 more on living costs since 2020 due to higher inflation, estimates Chris Brown, vice president of policy research with the Common Sense Institute in Greenwood Village, in a recent research note. And while wages are also rising, they haven’t kept up with inflation, which was running 8.2% in July.
Greeley Tribune: August 25, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
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With the feds ‘light’ on steps, Colorado’s water experts explore challenges and opportunities
“Eklund took part in a panel on “The Future of Colorado Water: Scarcity and Opportunity” hosted by Colorado Politics and The Denver Gazette. The other panelists were Troy Eid, an attorney with Greenberg Traurig and one of the West’s leading expert on tribal laws, including water; Jennifer Gimbel, a Terry J. Stevinson Fellow with the Common Sense Institute and formerly principal deputy assistant secretary for water and science at the Department of the Interior; Jennifer Pitt, director of the Colorado River Program at the National Audubon Society; and, Don Brown, former commissioner of agriculture for Colorado.”
The Colorado Springs Gazette: August 24, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
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Steffan Tubbs Show With Aaron Lapides 8-22-22 Hr3  
This is the daily recap of The Steffan Tubbs Show on News/Talk 710 KNUS featuring CSI’s Criminal Justice Fellow Mitch Morrissey.
Steffan Tubbs Show: August 22, 2022 by Steffan Tubbs
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Denver Gazette: Little to cheer in student test scores
“Such charter schools, which serve a tenth of Colorado’s public school students, can make a real difference in student achievement. Research a couple of years ago by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute revealed, for example, that charter schools have higher graduation rates than district-run schools in the state’s metro, north central and Pikes Peak regions. And they have a nearly 6% higher graduation rate for Black students across the state.
Colorado Politics: August 22, 2022 by
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Editorial: Little to cheer in student test scores
“Such charter schools, which serve a tenth of Colorado’s public school students, can make a real difference in student achievement. Research a couple of years ago by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute revealed, for example, that charter schools have higher graduation rates than district-run schools in the state’s metro, north central and Pikes Peak regions. And they have a nearly 6% higher graduation rate for Black students across the state.
Colorado Politics: August 22, 2022 by
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GUEST COLUMN: Colorado is a mess. Have voters had enough?
“That report from Common Sense Institute connects the increase in crime to “social justice” legislation passed during the last four years, leading to: Declining prison population (down 23% since 2008). Increasing use of personal recognizance bonds even in violent crime cases.”
The Gazette: August 22, 2022 by Mark Hillman
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Colorado homeowners go big when it comes to size of home equity loans this year
“The typical Colorado household has had to spend about $7,522 more on living costs since 2020 due to higher inflation, estimates Chris Brown, vice president of policy research with the Common Sense Institute in Greenwood Village, in a recent research note. And while wages are also rising, they haven’t kept up with inflation, which was running 8.2% in July.”
Canon City Daily Record: August 21, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
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Capitol Review – Today Colorado is a mess. Have voters had enough?
“That report from Common Sense Institute connects the increase in crime to “social justice” legislation passed during the last four years, leading to: Declining prison population (down 23% since 2008); Increasing use of personal-recognizance bonds even in violent crime cases; and Decriminalizing possession of four grams or less of Schedule II controlled substances, such as fentanyl, from a felony to a misdemeanor.”
Journal-Advocate: August 21, 2022 by Mark Hillman
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Capitol Review – Today Colorado is a mess. Have voters had enough?
“That report from Common Sense Institute connects the increase in crime to “social justice” legislation passed during the last four years, leading to: Declining prison population (down 23% since 2008); Increasing use of personal-recognizance bonds even in violent crime cases; and Decriminalizing possession of four grams or less of Schedule II controlled substances, such as fentanyl, from a felony to a misdemeanor.”
Journal-Advocate: August 21, 2022 by Mark Hillman
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Mark Hillman’s Capitol Review – Today Colorado is a mess. Have voters had enough?
“That report from Common Sense Institute connects the increase in crime to “social justice” legislation passed during the last four years, leading to: Declining prison population (down 23% since 2008); Increasing use of personal-recognizance bonds even in violent crime cases; and Decriminalizing possession of four grams or less of Schedule II controlled substances, such as fentanyl, from a felony to a misdemeanor.”
Kiowa County Press: August 21, 2022 by Mark Hillman
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Colorado’s unemployment rate drops to 3.3 percent
“The state’s labor force participation rate was 69.5 percent last month, according to an analysis of employment data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank.”
Kiowa County Press: August 21, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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No on Initiative 108, a TABOR refund rip-off
“Cost of living is too high in Colorado — including housing costs. According to the Common Sense Institute, the cost of purchasing a home has doubled in just the past seven years.”
The Daily Sentinel: August 21, 2022 by Michael fields
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Colorado homeowners go big when it comes to size of home equity loans this year
“The typical Colorado household has had to spend about $7,522 more on living costs since 2020 due to higher inflation, estimates Chris Brown, vice president of policy research with the Common Sense Institute in Greenwood Village, in a recent research note. And while wages are also rising, they haven’t kept up with inflation, which was running 8.2% in July.”
The Denver Post: August 20, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
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Colorado homeowners go big when it comes to size of home equity loans this year
“The typical Colorado household has had to spend about $7,522 more on living costs since 2020 due to higher inflation, estimates Chris Brown, vice president of policy research with the Common Sense Institute in Greenwood Village, in a recent research note. And while wages are also rising, they haven’t kept up with inflation, which was running 8.2% in July.”
UP Jobs News: August 20, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
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Affordable housing subsidy initiative makes November ballot
“Colorado had a housing shortage of between 93,000 and 216,000 units through 2020, according to a recent report by the Common Sense Institute. Another report ranked Colorado as the eighth most pricey state for renters.”
Kiowa County Press: August 20, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Colorado’s unemployment rate drops to 3.3%
“Colorado had a housing shortage of between 93,000 and 216,000 units through 2020, according to a recent report by the Common Sense Institute. Another report ranked Colorado as the eighth most pricey state for renters.”
The Center Square Colorado: August 19, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Colorado’s unemployment rate drops to 3.3%
“Colorado had a housing shortage of between 93,000 and 216,000 units through 2020, according to a recent report by the Common Sense Institute. Another report ranked Colorado as the eighth most pricey state for renters.”
KPVI: August 19, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Colorado’s unemployment rate drops to 3.3%
“Colorado had a housing shortage of between 93,000 and 216,000 units through 2020, according to a recent report by the Common Sense Institute. Another report ranked Colorado as the eighth most pricey state for renters.”
KPVI: August 19, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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Affordable housing subsidy initiative makes November ballot
“Colorado had a housing shortage of between 93,000 and 216,000 units through 2020, according to a recent report by the Common Sense Institute. Another report ranked Colorado as the eighth most pricey state for renters.”
Victoria Advocate: August 19, 2022 by Derek Draplin
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(Opinion) Michael Fields: No end in sight for housing affordability crisis
“According to Colorado’s Common Sense Institute, the affordability of purchasing a home in Colorado is at its lowest point in 33 years. Shockingly, the cost of purchasing a home has doubled over the last 7 years and half of that increase occurred over the course of the last two years alone.”
Greeley Tribune: August 19, 2022 by Michael Fields
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Affordable housing subsidy initiative makes November ballot
“Colorado had a housing shortage of between 93,000 and 216,000 units through 2020, according to a recent report by the Common Sense Institute. Another report ranked Colorado as the eighth most pricey state for renters.”
The Center Square Colorado: August 19, 2022 by Drek Draplin
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With the feds ‘light’ on steps, Colorado’s water experts explore challenges, opportunities
“Eklund took part in a panel on “The Future of Colorado Water: Scarcity and Opportunity” hosted by Colorado Politics and The Denver Gazette. The other panelists were Troy Eid, an attorney with Greenberg Traurig and one of the West’s leading expert on tribal laws, including water; Jennifer Gimbel, a Terry J. Stevinson Fellow with the Common Sense Institute and formerly Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Water & Science at the Department of the Interior; Jennifer Pitt, director of the Colorado River Program at the National Audubon Society; and, Don Brown, former commissioner of agriculture for Colorado.”
Colorado Politics: August 19, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
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We need to build more, not tax more’
“Cost of living is too high in Colorado – including housing costs. According to the Common Sense Institute, the cost of purchasing a home has doubled in just the past seven years.”
Colorado Politics: August 17, 2022 by Michael Fields
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PODIUM | Time to hand the reins to Republicans
“That report from Common Sense Institute connects the increase in crime to “social justice” legislation passed during the last four years, leading to: Declining prison population (down 23% since 2008); Increasing use of personal-recognizance bonds even in violent crime cases; and Decriminalizing possession of four grams or less of Schedule II controlled substances, such as fentanyl, from a felony to a misdemeanor.”
Colorado Politics: August 17, 2022 by Mark Hillman
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Letter: The Colorado Public Option will not help rural Colorado
“At the same time, private insurance providers will be forced to cut premiums or potentially lose licenses and certificates of authority to operate, according to the Common Sense Institute. As doctors’ and nurses’ reimbursements are capped and more people are forced onto public option plans, there is fear those providers will leave the state. Under Roberts’ public option, the CSI found that 3,900 to 4,900 health care jobs could be lost in Colorado mainly impacting rural communities with hospitals operating on tight margins.”
Craig Press: August 17, 2022 by Letters to the Editor
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Guest opinion: Michael Fields: No end in sight for housing affordability crisis
“According to Colorado’s Common Sense Institute, the affordability of purchasing a home in Colorado is at its lowest point in 33 years. Shockingly, the cost of purchasing a home has doubled over the last 7 years and half of that increase occurred over the course of the last two years alone.”
Daily Camera: August 17, 2022 by Michael Fields
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What’s behind next year’s 9% minimum wage increase in Denver and Colorado
“‘Inflation’s not all bad,’ said Steven Byers, an economist with Common Sense Institute, a conservative Greenwood Village organization focused on Colorado’s economic policies.”
The Colorado Sun: August 16, 2022 by Tamara Chuang
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Study examines ballot measure’s impact on state
“Doing so would reduce revenue to the state, but it wouldn’t impact overall state spending, at least in the short term, according to a study released by a Denver-based business group, Common Sense Institute.”
The Daily Sentinel: August 16, 2022 by Charles Ashby
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Childcare Gap Widens in Colorado, Experts weigh in
“There’s no greater stress for a working parent than finding childcare solutions to fit the needs of your family. A new report from the Common Sense Institute found the gap in childcare is growing — nearly 95,000 kids in Colorado need childcare but can’t access it — that number translates to about 38% of the state’s families.”
Western Slope Now: August 11, 2022 by Khira Isaacs
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Income tax measure could save Colorado taxpayers $1.6B over five years, think tank says
“Much of the two-month increase in inflation may have occurred in June, which is not reported separately in Colorado, as national inflation was flat in July,’ said Chris Brown, a vice president of policy and research with the Common Sense Institute, in emailed comments on the CPI report.”
The Center Square Colorado: August 11, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Income tax measure could save Colorado taxpayers $1.6B over five years, think tank says
“Much of the two-month increase in inflation may have occurred in June, which is not reported separately in Colorado, as national inflation was flat in July,’ said Chris Brown, a vice president of policy and research with the Common Sense Institute, in emailed comments on the CPI report.”
The Center Square Colorado: August 11, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Metro Denver inflation rate down slightly and below national average
“;Much of the two-month increase in inflation may have occurred in June, which is not reported separately in Colorado, as national inflation was flat in July,’ said Chris Brown, a vice president of policy and research with the Common Sense Institute, in emailed comments on the CPI report.”
The Denver Post: August 11, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
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Colorado Springs ATF special agent resigns, cites lack of criminal accountability in laws
“According to the Common Sense Institute, violent crime in Colorado in 2020 was 35% higher than in 2011. Additionally, the average monthly crime rate in 2021 is 28% higher than it was in 2011 and 15% higher than it was only two years ago in 2019 in Colorado.”
KRDO: August 11, 2022 by Sean Rice
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Inflation moderates in July, but costs stay elevated in Colorado
“‘Chris Brown, an economist at the conservative-leaning, business-funded Common Sense Institute in Colorado, says costs still outpace earnings. In July, he said the average household spent $821 more because of inflation.”
Axios Denver: August 11, 2022 by John Frank
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Consumer prices in Denver up 1.7% in last two months
“‘Much of the two-month increase in inflation may have occurred in June, which is not reported separately in Colorado, as national inflation was flat in July,’ the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, said in an analysis. ‘Despite any moderation in July, overall price growth continues to outpace earnings growth.'”
The Center Square Colorado: August 10, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Improving affordability and accessibility of childcare
“On July 19, Common Sense Institute (CSI) and Executives Partnering to Invest in Children (EPIC) presented a panel discussion on, “The growing strain on the childcare business model and economic impacts and opportunities for improving affordability and accessibility.” Luige del Puerto, editor of Colorado Politics and Denver Gazette moderated.”
The Villager: August 10, 2022 by Freda Miklin
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Denver police chief encourages public to help curb crime
“Prominent Republican George Brauchler called the spike in criminal activity a “Colorado crime tsunami,” in an op-ed last year, citing a report from the conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute.”
Axios Denver: August 10, 2022 by Esteban L. Hernandez
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Colorado’s Offender-Centered, Anti-Cop Policies Blamed for ‘Crime Tsunami’
“Over the last few years, Colorado has had a higher rate of auto theft than any other state, behind only Washington D.C., according to a December report by the non-partisan Common Sense Institute that analyzed the cost of the Colorado crime wave.”
National Review: August 10, 2022 by Ryan Mills
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Governor Polis renames TABOR refunds in election year maneuver: ‘A rose is a rose’
“Common Sense Institute says enterprise revenue, which makes up 40% of the state budget and is largely funded by fees, grew by $11 billion between 2019 and 2021.”
CBS Colorado: August 5, 2022 by Shaun Boyd
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LETTERS: What are the bike lanes for?; education not ‘one-size-fits-all’
“[CSI’s Education Fellow] Jason Gaulden’s assessment that “college for all” has failed many students is spot-on. Too many students graduate (or, even worse, fail to graduate) from college with untenable amounts of student debt and dismal career prospects.”
The Gazette: August 4, 2022 by Gazette Readers
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The Success of Our Economy Depends on Accessible, Affordable Child Care
“Common Sense Institute’s partnership and collaboration with Executives Partnering to Invest in Children (EPIC) brought to fruition a comprehensive analysis of the razor-thin profit margins with which child care businesses have to work.”
ColoradoBiz: August 3, 2022 by Kristin Strohm and Nicole Riehl
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GUEST COLUMN: Fentanyl tragedy is cautionary tale for lawmakers
“Many in the law enforcement community note a linkage between those crimes and increased fentanyl addiction. The Common Sense Institute estimated the cost of fentanyl overdoses to our state as being over $11 billion.”
The Gazette: August 3, 2022 by Greg Fulton
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Report: High costs preventing 38% of Colorado kids from child care access
“High operational costs are preventing 38% of Colorado’s children from accessing childcare, according to a new report. The report, which was compiled by the Common Sense Institute (CSI) and Executives Partnering to Invest in Children (EPIC), analyzed the total revenue and expenses of running a childcare center and juxtaposes those findings against the regulatory environment where the centers operate.”
The Chronicle: August 2, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Aurora and Denver look to ban taxing government fees
“Common Sense Institute found $26 billion — or 40% of all state funding — now comes from fees. That’s up from $742 million in 1994 when TABOR went into effect.”
CBS Colorado: August 1, 2022 by Shaun Boyd
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2022 | July

Colorado lacking housing affordability, pair of reports show
“Another report released Thursday by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, says that housing affordability in the state is at its lowest level in over three decades…. ‘We are at a crisis point and ‘business as usual’ is simply not acceptable,’ Peter LiFari, CSI’s housing policy fellow said in a statement. ‘It’s time for a transformational change and that starts with bold policy actions from our elected officials.'”
Center Square – Colorado: July 28, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Opinion: Falling behind
“With the pre-pandemic inflation rate under 2 percent, and after considering all the other metrics that go into the calculation, what you bought for $40 in 2019 costs $46.36 today. That increase adds up quickly – the Common Sense Institute reports, ‘the average Colorado household has spent $5,880 more since 2020 because of inflation.'”
Colorado Springs Indy: July 27, 2022 by Patience Kabwasa
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Slowing and uneven job growth persists in Colorado
“The financial sector shed 1,900 jobs in June, as mortgage services took a hit with rising interest rates. ‘The construction industry remains in positive territory, but declines are likely moving forward,’ Steven Byers, an economist at the business-backed Common Sense Institute, told Axios Denver.”
Axios Denver: July 25, 2022 by John Frank
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PERSPECTIVE: Moving beyond ‘college for all’
“Nationally a four-year degree from a highly selective, private liberal arts college runs in the neighborhood of $70,000 per year. In Colorado, the average annual in-state college tuition is $12,648 which, according to a Common Sense Institute report, reflects a 240% increase from 2002 to 2020.”
The Gazette: July 24, 2022 by Jason Gaulden
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More Colorado employers hitting the brakes on hiring, but June job gains held up
“Professional and business services, and financial activities were the two weakest sectors in the June report, losing 1,800 and 1,900 jobs respectively. ‘This is mostly explained by the drop in mortgage-related services as demand for loan originations has plummeted in the response to higher mortgage rates,’ Steven Byers, a senior economist with the Common Sense Institute, said in a commentary about the losses in finance jobs.”
The Denver Post: July 22, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
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Colorado has now had its lowest job-growth months of the year in a row
“Steven Byers, senior economist for business-focused think-tank Common Sense Institute, said in a news release that the financial-services losses are explained by a drop in mortgage-related services as demand for loan originations has plummeted in response to higher mortgage rates. He pegged the boost in leisure and hospitality jobs to the increase in summer travel activity.”
Denver Business Journal: July 22, 2022 by Ed Sealover
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EDITORIAL: Hit the brakes on ‘electrification’
“The sweeping policy shift ushered in by House Bill 1362 – which, through a convoluted chain of events, will result in the adoption of local ‘green’ building codes – would lead to the retrofitting of existing homes for electrification, as well. All of which could cost Colorado homeowners $59 billion to $68 billion by 2031 and would exacerbate Colorado acute housing shortage, according to the study released last week by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute.”
The Denver Gazette: July 20, 2022 by Gazette editorial board
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Report: High costs preventing 38% of Colorado kids from child care access
“Colorado’s child care industry also continues to see consolidation, the report found. Between April 2018 and April 2021, more than 913 child care centers permanently closed in the state while 486 new programs opened. ‘The reality of that number translates into women staying out of the workforce and incredible strain on family budgets,’ said Alexa Eastburg, a Research Analyst at CSI.”
KPVI 6: July 19, 2022 by Robert Davis
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As child-care gap widens in Colorado, experts urge ‘creative’ ideas
“A new report from the Common Sense Institute and Executives Partnering to Invest in Children found that the gap in child care is growing – nearly 95,000 kids in Colorado need child care but can’t access it, which translate to about 38% of the state’s families…. A big part of the problem, the CSI report said, is the lack of affordability of child care. Colorado is the eighth-most-expensive place for child care in the U.S., costing families nearly 18% of their income.”
The Gazette: July 19, 2022 by Lindsey Toomer
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Report: High costs preventing 38% of Colorado kids from child care access
“The report, which was compiled by the Common Sense Institute (CSI) and Executives Partnering to Invest in Children (EPIC), analyzed the total revenue and expenses of running a child care center and juxtaposes those findings against the regulatory environment where the center operates.”
The Daily Sentinel: July 19, 2022 by Robert Davis
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CONVERSATIONS | Affordable & accessible child care: Colorado’s workforce challenge
“‘There is no greater stress for a working parent than finding a child care solution that fits the needs of your family. If something falls through, your life is upended really quickly. As a mom of four, I know that reality all too well.’ Said Kristin Strohm, President and CEO of Common Sense Institute in Greenwood Village.”
The Denver Gazette: July 19, 2022
Watch >>

PERSPECTIVE: What price electrification?
“By addressing climate change through reasonable policies, we can improve the lives of individuals and the resilience of our communities. However, this must be balanced against our current housing crisis. Before taking any steps toward beneficial electrification, policymakers should ensure that is it economically justified. In other words, ensuring beneficial electrification is, in fact, beneficial for all Coloradans.”
The Denver Gazette: July 17, 2022 by Evelyn Lim
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New statewide building code could cost homeowners $68 billion
“Evelyn Lim, author of the institute’s report and former Regional Administrator for Region 8 of the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Trump administration, said the institute has a strict non-advocacy policy and noted that her report relied on a more recent analysis using local costs in implementing the new code from Group 14 Engineering, a Denver consulting firm specializing in energy and resource efficiency…. ‘Looking at the PNNL analysis, they indicate it would take an average of 17.3 years to recover those costs. That is longer than the average length of time a homeowner stays in their home,’ Lim said.”
The Denver Gazette: July 15, 2022 by Scott Weiser
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Aurora leaders look to avoid tax on new delivery fee
“A study by Common Sense Institute found there are now more than $27 billion in state fees in Colorado. Which amounts to $4,600 per Coloradan per year.”
CBS 4 Colorado: July 13, 2022 by Shaun Boyd
Watch >>

Opinion: Denver has the resources to “cure” homelessness if money is spent on proven solutions instead of sweeps 
“November, the Common Sense Institute, a non-partisan research organization dedicated to the protection and promotion of Colorado’s economy, found that Denver spends about half-a-billion dollars on homelessness in 2020 and estimated that number could balloon to more than $800 billion in 2022 if announced funding comes to fruition. CSI determined Denver spends between $41,679 and $104,201 per person experiencing homelessness per year. In comparison, Denver spends $19,202 per student per year of public education according to the analysis, while rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Denver is $21,156 per year.”
The Denver Post: July 11, 2022 by Rhonda Hackett
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Homelessness in Denver: An in-depth look into an ongoing crisis
“A November report from The Common Sense Institute (CSI) – a non-partisan research organization dedicated to the protection and promotion of Colorado’s economy – found that Denver spends about half-a-billion dollars each year to prevent and resolve homelessness, which is between $41,679 to $104,201 being spent per person experiencing homelessness per year. That money is being used for shelters, services, emergency response and healthcare for people experiencing homelessness, the report states. In comparison, according to the analysis, Denver spends about $19,202 per student per year on public education.”
ABC Denver 7: July 12, 2022 by Oscar Contreras
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Colorado’s health care experiment gets go-ahead from Biden administration
“Chris Brown at the Common Sense Institute, a business-backed group that opposes the policy, claimed the new option ‘will force difficult choices across the market, as providers choose to cut services or pass on costs to the remaining private insurance market, thereby increasing rates on everyone else.”
Axios Denver: July 7, 2022 by Arielle Dreher and John Frank
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SLOAN | Insult to injury for everyday Coloradans
“The Common Sense Institute last year did the sums and all of the taxes and fees imposed on Coloradans since 2018 comes in at $1.8 billion, which approaches real money.”
Colorado Politics: July 7, 2022 by Kelly Sloan
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GOP groups bet on high cost of living to win unaffiliated voters
“A recent analysis by the Common Sense Institute, a conservative-leaning think tank, found that the law could increase the cost of an average home by tens of thousands.”
Alamosa News: July 6, 2022 by Faith Miller
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When Is enough, enough with taxes and fees?
“In 2021, the Common Sense Institute released a study which detailed the many tax and fee increases new to Colorado since 2018. The research found that, in total, individuals and businesses are expected to pay approximately $1.8 billion more in taxes and fees through the next few years as a result of recently passed policies. This number is continuing to grow.”
Colorado Politics: July 6, 2022 by Tony Gagliardi
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Centennial State About to Discover Public Option’s Nightmare
“Should premiums fall short of these targets, the law empowers the state to dictate the prices Colorado Option plans pay to doctors and hospitals – ostensibly forcing providers to take massive pay-cuts.”
Newsmax: July 5, 2022 by Sally Pipes
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Can Republicans flip the Colorado Senate in November?
“A recent analysis by the Common Sense Institute, a conservative-leaning think tank, found that the law could increase the cost of an average home by tens of thousands.”
Colorado Newsline: July 5, 2022 by Faith Miller
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Editorial: Crime + economy = trouble for ruling Dems
“It’s the latest installment in a depressing saga of crime statistics chronicled in a groundbreaking report released late last year by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute. Among the lowlights: Violent crime rose 35% from 2011 to last year. The state’s crime rate for 2021 was the highest since 1994. Colorado’s 2020 murder rate was 106% higher than in 2011. Assault was up 40% in that same time. Rape was 9% higher. “
The Denver Gazette: July 5, 2022 by Denver Gazette editorial board
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Colorado GDP down 1.9% in first quarter
“In Colorado, the state’s mining, quarrying, and oil and gas industries each declined by 10% when compared to the fourth quarter of 2021, according to the data from the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank.”
The Center Square Colorado: July 1, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Aurora makes strides in the crime fight
“Actually just the opposite seems to be the case in Colorado. The state’s surging crime has been accompanied by a years-long decline in the number of lawbreakers behind bars, as revealed in a groundbreaking study released last year by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute. Plausibly, it has been a reluctance to jail wrongdoers – not social and economic factors – that has fueled the crime wave.”
The Denver Gazette: July 1, 2022 Denver Gazette editorial board
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2022 | June

Economic Experts Agree That Inflation Is A Worldwide Problem
“On June 21, the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a non-partisan organization dedicated to free enterprise and a strong Colorado economy, held a panel discussion on the impact of inflation on the rising cost of living as part of its regular Eggs and the Economy program…. Steven Byers noted that ‘Housing prices started rising about seven or eight years ago in response to the huge influx of people that were moving to Colorado. At that time, we already had a housing shortage.’ Since then, ‘We haven’t built enough housing to offset that increased demand.'”
The Villager: June 29, 2022 by Freda Miklin
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Lower-cost ‘Colorado Option’ Health Plan Wins Federal Approval
“In May, a report from the conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute warned that the legislation does not properly account for soaring medical inflation in recent months. Though HB-1232 caps allowable growth of standardized plan premiums each year at the 10-year average annual rate of national medical inflation, the Common Sense Institute found that formula ‘too restrictive to properly account for the actual medical costs that the healthcare industry will face in the coming years.'”
Pagosa Daily Post: June 27, 2022 by Post Contributor
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Report: Colorado electrification goals could add up to $68.4B total in costs
“Colorado’s electrification goals could add up to $68.4 billion in total costs over the next decade, a new report says. The state’s electrification goals could negatively impact housing affordability at a time when housing shortage is likely to increase, according to the report published Tuesday by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank.”
The Chronicle-News.com: June 24, 2022
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Lower-cost ‘Colorado Option’ health plan wins approval from feds
“‘If the Colorado Option insurance payments do not keep pace with rising costs, health care providers will likely be forced to choose between cutting services and passing on costs by raising prices for most insured Coloradans,’ Common Sense Institute’s May report added, referring to Coloradans who do not buy health insurance plans on the state exchange.”
Colorado Newsline: June 23, 2022 by Faith Miller
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Report: Colorado electrification goals could add up to $68.4B total in costs
“‘Due to continuing supply issues, policymakers should focus on policies that will incentivize and create more housing – such as the recently passed HB22-1282 which created an innovative housing incentive program,’ Evelyn Lim, a CSI research fellow wrote. ‘Yet as laudable as that program can be, the legislature also passed legislation that will make it harder, and more expensive, to build new housing units.'”
The Center Square Colorado: June 22, 2022 by Robert Davis
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The Costs of Infrastructure and Housing Affordability
“‘I think there is a slight chance of hope here. As I mentioned the energy code board that was created by the legislation… the code board is tasked with putting together a code. One of the things that I mention in my report is that the biggest stakeholders here are the homeowners of Colorado and they don’t have a voice on that energy code board. They don’t have a say on whether they even want this for their homes and so I think that part of that process should include a public comment period or public comment input on what these codes should look like,’ said Evelyn Lim, CSI’s 2022 Mike A. Leprino Free Enterprise Fellow.”
KOA – AM Radio: June 22, 2022 by Ross Kaminsky
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Report: Colorado electrification goals could add up to $68.4B total in costs
“The state’s electrification goals could negatively impact housing affordability at a time when housing shortage is likely to increase, according to the report published Tuesday by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank….’Housing affordability remains a top issue facing Coloradans,’ said Evelyn Lim, a research fellow with CSI who authored the report. ‘With rising inflation, supply chain disruptions, workforce shortages, and complex land-use regulations, the outlook for housing development in the state looks bleak.'”
The Daily Sentinel – Grand Junction: June 22, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Denver expands eviction legal assistance contracts as Colorado faces acute shortage of housing units
“The city made the move as metro Denver and the rest of the state experience an acute shortage of housing units. The Common Sense Institute puts Colorado’s housing deficit at 195,912 units, saying it could feasibly reach 514,462 units by 2031.”
The Denver Gazette: June 21, 2022 by Lindsey Toomer
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As CO option stumbles, inflation spikes, we pay more
“Put simply, the Colorado Option’s allowable growth formula wildly underestimates the actual costs healthcare providers will face in coming years – from medical supplies to workforce and more. As we have estimated in previous research, this failure of the Colorado Option to meet the underlying costs of care will force difficult choices across the market. Providers – doctors, nurses, hospitals and caregivers – will be forced to choose between cutting services or passing costs on to the remaining private insurance market, thereby increasing rates on everyone else.”
Colorado Politics: June 20, 2022 by Chris Brown
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5 Things Colorado: LGBTQ+ behavioral health, legislators recap session, Inflation’s impact on Colorado Option 
“A report from the Common Sense Institute last month indicates that rising inflation levels could jeopardize health plans’ requirements to lower premiums to a certain threshold under the Colorado Option. Starting in 2023 commercial carriers are required to offer a state-designed standardized plan, with premiums required to be 5% lower then the carrier’s average 2021 premium rate.”
State of Reform: June 16, 2022 by Eli Kirshbaum
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Report: Prices in Denver have increased 8.3 percent in last year
“On top of that, the Denver metro area ranks as the 10th highest among its peer cities in terms of total price growth since end of 2020. Overall, Colorado households are spending approximately $5,880 more for goods and services now than they were two years ago, according to CSI. ‘Wage growth is not keeping up with inflation and Coloradans’ budgets are being squeezed, causing many people to return to the labor force,’ the analysis said.”
Kiowa County Press: June 14, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Officials Push For Fentanyl Felony Charge
“According to an analysis from the Common Sense Institute in 2020, Colorado experienced 540 fentanyl related deaths, that’s a 143% increase from 2019. In 2021, there were more than 800 fentanyl related deaths, up 260% from 2019. Now  Colorado’s law officials worry if we don’t act now, the numbers will only get worse…. With the rising increase in fentanyl related deaths, experts at the Common Sense Institute say, we are losing nearly three Coloradan’s a day to fentanyl, ‘Look fentanyl kills period, more than any other drug that we have seen in a long time,’ George Brauchler, CSI Criminal Justice Fellow says.”
North Denver News: June 14, 2022 by James Python
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Report: Prices in Denver have increased 8.3% in last year
“Colorado’s average inflation rate between 2010 and 2020 was 2.51%, according to an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank. CSI also said that one of the biggest risks inflation is posing for consumers is that wages are not keeping pace with inflation. For instance, the U.S. average hourly earnings have grown by 5.24% over the last year, which accounts for just 61% of the total increase in inflation, the analysis found.”
The Center Square Colorado: June 13, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Councilman pursues ordinance to make Aurora ‘most punitive city’ in Colorado to combat auto thefts
“Mitch Morrissey, a former district attorney in Denver and a fellow at the Common Sense Institute, said he disagrees that car thefts can be compared to the threat of penalties for more everyday behavior, such as speeding or not paying a parking meter in the context of deterrence. Stealing a car requires a series of deliberate actions, he said, and it also is frequently a dangerous crime because of the use of stolen cars to commit other crimes such as robbery.”
The Gazette: June 12, 2022 by Julia Cardi
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What’s Working: Coloradans feel inflation’s pain, make compromises on food and travel
“That puts Colorado slightly lower than the U.S. for May and that may be because prices show up faster in the state than elsewhere, said Steven L. Byers, senior economist at the Common Sense Institute, a conservative-leaning economic think tank in Greenwood Village. ‘One possible explanation is that Colorado emerged out of the downturn quicker than the nation as a whole and that this sped up pricing pressures as Coloradans returned to work sooner than the nation as a whole,’ Byers said.”
The Colorado Sun: June 11, 2022 by Tamara Chuang
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Inflationary pressures jeopardize DORA plans of standardize health plan benefits under Colorado Option
“‘What we’ve seen in the last 12 months is that inflation is now running really high,’ said Chris Brown, Common Sense Institute’s Vice President of Policy and Research.’… ‘ What you want is stability. And when you don’t have stability and you have uncertainty and rapidly rising prices, this puts a crunch on everybody.'”
KMTV (CSB 3) NE: June 6, 2022 by Meghan Lopez
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Inflationary pressures jeopardize DORA plans of standardize health plan benefits under Colorado Option
“Data released by the Common Sense Institute, a conservative think tank in Colorado, showed medical inflation has risen to 7.62% in Metro Denver, which is nearly 5 points higher than the allowable growth rate estimated by the Division of Insurance…. ‘The CSI report highlights another key challenge we see for hospitals and health systems faced with implementing the Colorado Option – the role of inflation and growth in expenses,’ said the Colorado Hospital Association (CHA) in a statement issued to State of Reform.”
State of Reform: June 4, 2022 by Boram Kim
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Raising interest rates can help curb inflation, but at a cost
“‘What we’ve seen in the last 12 months is that inflation is now running really high,’ said Chris Brown, Common Sense Institute’s Vice President of Policy and Research. ‘What you want is stability and when you don’t have stability and you have uncertainty and rapidly rising prices, this puts a crunch on everybody,’ Brown continued.”
KOAA NBC Colorado Springs: June 1, 2022 by Meghan Lopez
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2022 | May

Inflation is chewing up Coloradans’ spending power. How are consumers coping?
“The typical Colorado household has spent $4,467 more since 2020 because of inflation, Steven Byers, a senior economist with the Common Sense Institute in Greenwood Village, estimated in a research note last month. Although labor shortages are helping push up wages, pay increases are covering less than two-thirds of the most recent price spikes, he said. And not every worker is getting that average wage hike of 5.6%.”
The Denver Post: May 31, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
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Raising interest rates can help curb inflation, but at a cost
“‘What we’ve seen in the last 12 months is that inflation is now running really hot. This is hurting the average Coloradoan, and this is impacting Colorado households,’ said Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research at the Common Sense Institute. ‘What you want is stability, and when you don’t have stability, and you have uncertainty and rapidly rising prices, this puts a crunch on everybody.’ CSI estimates the average Colorado household spent $4,467 more since 2020 because of inflation. Overall, its data has found that price levels have increased 2% between January and March.”
The Denver Channel 7 ABC: May 31, 2022 by Meghan Lopez
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Inflation is chewing up Coloradans’ spending power. How are consumers coping?
“The typical Colorado household has spent $4,467 more since 2020 because of inflation, Steven Byers, a senior economist with the Common Sense Institute in Greenwood Village, estimated in a research note last month. Although labor shortages are helping push up wages, pay increases are covering less than two-thirds of the most recent price spikes, he said.”
Canon City Daily Record: May 31, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
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Polis signs bill increasing penalties for fentanyl 
“‘Law enforcement officers, business leaders, parents and loved ones are begging for the tools necessary to prosecute those responsible for trafficking this horrific drug,’ Mitch Morrissey, CSI’s criminal justice fellow, said in a statement earlier this month.”
Kiowa County Press: May 26, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Colorado Option Report: Inflation could force Colorado health care providers to raise price, cut services
“A new report sheds light on how inflation could impact Colorado’s health insurance option program, also know as the Colorado Option. The report, published by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, examines how the Colorado Option’s use of premium rate caps – which prevent service providers from raising rates – does not accurately reflect inflation as a variable in its rate calculations.”
The Chronicle-News.com: May 26, 2022
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Denver Data Doesn’t Back Mayor’s Claim That PR Bonds Are Leading to More Crime
“George Brauchler co-authored a crime study with former Denver district attorney Mitch Morrissey, a Democrat, for the Common Sense Institute, a right-leaning Colorado think tank. ‘It is simply undeniable that the legislature over the last decade or so has made it easier to decrease penalties for criminal conduct,’ Brauchler previously told Westword, noting that PR bonds and an uptick in crime ‘seems to be happening at the same time.'”
Westword: May 26, 2022 by Conor McCormick-Cavanagh
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Polis signs bill increasing penalties for fentanyl
“Common Sense Institute (CSI) criminal justice fellows George Brauchler and Mitch Morrissey – both former district attorneys – also said the governor needs to convene a special session to ‘pass consequential legislation’ to further address the crisis.”
Center Square Colorado: May 25, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Common Sense Institute: Colorado Option could lead to cuts in services or higher premiums
“The issue is medical inflation, according to the Common Sense Institute (CSI) report. That’s a combination of higher use of services – in part driven by the pandemic – and the unit cost of services…. As a result, CSI says, payments will not keep up with those growing cots, and that will force providers to either cut costs that could, in turn, affect quality and access, or pass on the losses from the Colorado Option to other private insurers.”
The Denver Gazette: May 25, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
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Colorado legislators wrestle with drug penalties as fentanyl deaths surge
“Fentanyl fatalities doubled from 222 in 2019 to 540 in 2020, then surged to about 800 in 2021, according to state figures compiled by the Common Sense Institute in Denver.”
The Washington Times: May 24, 2022 by Valerie Richardson
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PERSPECTIVE: The persistent problems of PERA
“If we can’t prioritize the stability of PERA in good times, this sets a bad precedent for tougher times. It’s important not to get complacent on an issue as important and impactful as PERA. Given the work of the state legislature in recent years, it’s easy to think the problem is solved. However, not maintaining the commitment to adequately fund PERA reflects the same decisions made over the last two decades that got us to this point. We simply must fulfill our commitment and pay the price.”
The Denver Gazette: May 22, 2022 by Earl Wright
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Governor Polis signs public safety bills into law
“The legislation was passed as the cost of crime in Colorado continues to climb. According to a report from the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, crime in the sate cost taxpayers approximately $31 billion last year, up nearly 13 percent from 2020.”
Kiowa County Press: May 21, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Report: Inflation could force Colorado health care providers to raise prices, cut services
“The report, published by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, examines how the Colorado Option’s use of premium rate caps – which prevent service providers from raising rates – does not accurately reflect inflation as a variable in its rate calculations. ‘Our findings simply mean that the Colorado Option plan will struggle to pay medical providers rates that keep up with their underlying costs,’ Chris Brown, CSI’s vice president of policy and research, said in a statement.”
Kiowa County Press: May 20, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Colorado’s unemployment rate drops to 3.6% in April
“However, there are still some industries that are struggling to recover from the pandemic, according to an analysis of the unemployment figures from the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, The leisure and hospitality industry added more than 6,400 jobs back in April but it’s still down nearly the same number of jobs when compared to employment levels from January 2020. Accommodation and food services are also down approximately 6,700 jobs when compared to January 2020 employment levels as well, according to the analysis.”
The Center Square Colorado: May 20, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Polis signs public safety bills into law
“The legislation was passed as the cost of crime in Colorado continues to climb. According to a report from the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, crime in the state cost taxpayers approximately $31 billion last year, up nearly 13% from 2020.”
The Center Square Colorado: May 20, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Report: Inflation could force Colorado health care providers to raise prices, cut services
“Chris Brown, CSI’s vice president of policy and research said that the current construction of the Colorado Option accounts for medical inflation rates of up to 2.7%. Denver’s medical inflation rate from March 2021 to March 2022 was 7.6%, nearly three-times higher than the rate that the Colorado Option accounts for…. ‘As we have demonstrated in our previous research, this will force difficult choices across the market, as providers choose to cut services or pass on costs to the remaining private insurance market, thereby increasing rate on everyone else,’ he said.”
KPVI 6: May 19, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Report: Inflation could force Colorado health care providers to raise prices, cut services
“The report, published by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, examines how the Colorado Option’s use of premium rate caps – which prevent service providers from raising rates – does not accurately reflect inflation as a variable in its rate calculations. ‘Our findings simply mean that the Colorado Option plan will struggle to pay medical providers rates that keep up with their underlying costs,’ Chris Brown, CSI’s president of policy and research, said in a statement.”
The Center Square Colorado: May 19, 2022 by Robert Davis
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A wakeup call as Denver’s standing slips
“‘The message is out that Denver has big city crime and traffic problems,’ Steven Byers, senior economist with Colorado’s Common Sense Institute, told The Gazette. ‘People see the way Gov. Polis and Mayor Hancock handled the homeless people and they want to get away from that.’ Byers said metro Denver is too pricey for a lot of young people starting out in careers and struggling to make their monthly car payments, rent and student loans.”
The Denver Gazette: May 19, 2022 by The Gazette Editorial Board
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How did Colorado become one of the worst states for vehicle theft? Auto theft task force officials, reformers disagree.
“Mitch Morrissey, a former Denver prosecutor and a fellow at the Common Sense Institute, shared similar concerns with legislators before the start of this year’s session through a report on crime trends he helped author…. What he found is that since 2008, the state prison population has gone down by 23% while crime has increased by 47%.”
The Denver Post: May 16, 2022 by Josh Aguilar
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Denver falls to No. 55 in annual Best Places to Live report
“‘The message is out that Denver has big city crime and traffic problems,’ said Steven Byers, senior economist with the Denver-based Common Sense Institute. ‘People see the way Governor Polis and Mayor Hancock handled the homeless people and they want to get away from that.’ Byers said Denver is 160,000 homes short of what it needs to avoid overcrowding. The metro area is often too expensive for young people who have monthly care payments, rent and student loans.”
The Denver Gazette: May 16, 2022 by Rich Laden and Carol McKinley
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Critics of fentanyl bill call for special session
“Common Sense Institute (CSI) criminal justice fellows George Brauchler and Mitch Morrissey – both former district attorneys – also called for a special session to pass legislation that further addresses the fentanyl crisis….’We simply cannot ignore the issue. Governor Polis should immediately call for a special session and pass consequential legislation to address the fentanyl crisis,’ Morrissey said. ‘Law enforcement officers, business leaders, parents and loved ones are begging for the tools necessary to prosecute those responsible for trafficking this horrific drug.'”
Kiowa County Press: May 13, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Critics of fentanyl bill call for special session
“Common Sense Institute (CSI) criminal justice fellows George Brauchler and Mitch Morrissey – both former district attorneys – also called for a special session to pass legislation that further addresses the fentanyl crisis. ‘We simply cannot ignore the issue. Governor Polis should immediately call for a special session and pass consequential legislation to address the fentanyl crisis,’ Morrissey said. ‘Law enforcement officers, business leaders, parents and loved ones are begging for the tools necessary to prosecute those responsible for trafficking this horrific drug.'”
The Center Square – Colorado: May 13, 2022 by Robert Davis
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How Much Money Did State Lawmakers Actually Save You?
“While there are some smaller cuts to vehicle registrations and professional licenses, Common Sense Institute says the 12 biggest reductions of the 2022 session aren’t new savings. Chris Brown with CSI says the cuts add up to $854,000 but almost half of that is money taxpayers would have received as bigger refunds under the Taxpayer Bill of Rights.”
Denver CBS4: May 12, 2022 by Shaun Boyd
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Denver expects to meet its revenue goal from increased parking meter rates
“‘Stop subsidizing the homeless industrial complex and start building housing, build and administer public housing. The report from the Common Sense Institute and CU Denver reveal that Denver is spending double the cost of housing of its entire homeless population.’ Said a public homeless advocate protesting the urban camping ban that has been in place for 10 years at the Denver City Council Meeting last night.”
KDVR FOX Denver: May 10, 2022
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Denver expects to meet its revenue goal from increased parking meter rates
“Steven Byers, a senior economist with the Common Sense Institute, said while folks may not be happy about the increase in the cost of parking, this brings Denver more in line with similarly sized cities. He did note that with automobile crime increasing lately, people may prefer to park in an attended lot. ‘Whether or not this $9.5 million in revenue will be realized really is dependent on whether or not the increase in the meter fees drive down the use of those meters or if it stays the same,’ Byers said.”
The Denver Gazette: May 8, 2022 by Lindsey Toomer
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Colorado Senate OKs controversial fentanyl
“Other studies have shown that fentanyl has cost Colorado taxpayers a considerable sum over the last five years. Research from the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, found that the total lifetime cost of fentanyl overdose deaths in Colorado reached $15.2 billion in 2021, a 127% increase from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s previous estimates in 2017.”
The Center Square Colorado: May 6, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Colorado Senate makes its choice on unemployment-fund bill
“Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research for the Common Sense Institute, estimated that employers faced an increase of $4.2 billion in higher fees over the next four years than had been anticipated at the end of 2019.”
Denver Business Journal: May 4, 2022 by Ed Sealover
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Podium| Protect taxpayers – tame PERA’s debts
“Consider this: a recent study from the non-partisan Common Sense Institute (CSI) estimates that approximately 50% of annual contributions are used to pay down the unfunded liability. Our state’s pension program is not actuarially supported by enough pension assets. Thus, this huge unfunded liability of approximately $30 billion. … Additionally, if actuarial analysis suggested that in 2048 the fund will still have a deficit, annual participant and employee payments into the fund would be increased by an agreed formula and pensioners’ inflation adjusted payments would be reduced.”
Colorado Politics: May 3, 2022 by Kent Thiry and Earl L. Wright
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Colorado business groups split over unemployment trust fund legislation
“Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research for the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, said Colorado has the sixth-highest outstanding loan balance in the country. ‘Addressing the solvency of the [unemployment insurance trust fund] is critical as employers face over $4 billion in higher taxes over the next several years to build back the trust fund as a result of the economic fallout from the pandemic,’ he said.”
The Center Square: May 2, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Housing prices increase, CSU hopes to provide employee homes
“In a study done by the Common Sense Institute, trends in housing prices are only going up. The average mortgage for a starter home has increased by $1,142 per month — that’s a 69% increase since 2015 alone. Furthermore, the average monthly rent has increased $317 across the state.”
The Rocky Mountain Collegian: May 1, 2022 by Isabel Brown
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Colorado Point of View
“‘It’s a wicked smart question to ask because it’s about priorities. If you look at just education alone, we’re spending about 11% more in K-12 education and higher education this year. But for K-12, despite that 11% increase, there’s only a 6% increase in per pupil spending. That other 5% is money that’s going to education but not getting into the classroom. That’s not a lack of money, that’s a lack of prioritization and a lack of getting the right money to the right people.’ Said George Brauchler, a CSI criminal justice fellow and former 18th judicial district attorney.”
FOX31 Denver: May 1, 2022
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2022 | April

Polis, legislators say Coloradans will get $400 in tax refund this summer
“‘And while higher inflation is putting pressure on all household budgets, it is contributing to strong state revenue growth in combination with the economic recovery from the pandemic, and large federal spending,’ Chris Brown said. ‘So, at a time when General Fund spending is expected to grow 12.7% in next year’s budget, when state reserves are more than double where they were heading into the pandemic, the government spending growth limitation of the TABOR formula has created more than $3.5B in anticipated taxpayer refunds over two years.’
Colorado Politics: April 28, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
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Colorado lawmakers introduce legislation to put $600M into state unemployment insurance system
An analysis of the plan by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, found that the investment could save Colorado businesses more than $560 million in additional premium payments. J.J. Ament, CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, described the bill as ‘one of the most important pro-business and pro-economy bills that has been introduced this session. By putting this money into the system, it lowers the overall tax on businesses when they hire a new employee,’ Ament said.”
The Center Square: April 27, 2022 by Robert Davis
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GV plans to make misdemeanor drug possession a municipal violation to impose stiffer penalties
“Earlier in that city council study session, GV Police Chief Dustin Varney presented statewide crime statistics from a December 2021 report issued by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), whose website describes it as a non-partisan research organization dedicated to the protection and promotion of Colorado’s economy. Varney shared that the report said, in part, ‘Colorado has the highest increase in its property crime rate 2011-2020 among all the states,’ Colorado’s violent crime in 2020 was 35% higher than in 2011, nationally the rate grew 3%,’ and ‘Colorado has the highest motor vehicle theft rate among all states in 2020.’”
The Villager: April 27, 2022 by Freda Miklin
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Colorado lawmakers introduce legislation to put $600M into state unemployment insurance system
“First, as the Common Sense Institute observes, inflation is a driving cause of strong state revenue growth. Colorado’s economy is growing, but that’s in spite of Polis and the Democrats. Their pandemic policies and anti-business legislation and regulations have decimated Colorado businesses and further exacerbated inflation.”
Kiowa County Press: April 27, 2022 by Robert Davis
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SENGENBERGER | Colorado Dems flip-flop on TABOR?
“First, as the Common Sense Institute observes, inflation is a driving cause of strong state revenue growth. Colorado’s economy is growing, but that’s in spite of Polis and the Democrats. Their pandemic policies and anti-business legislation and regulations have decimated Colorado businesses and further exacerbated inflation.”
Colorado Politics: April 27, 2022 by Jimmy Sengenberger
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Colorado House advances mobile home protection bill without rent control provision
“A recent analysis of HB22-1287 by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, found that the bill prior to the rent control provision’s removal, could have caused a reduction in the total supply of manufactured homes available and a reduction of state income tax revenue. The think tank said passage of the bill would have opened up ‘a Pandora’s Box allowing for expansion of rent control to other classes of private property, further impinging on private property owners’ rights.'”
The Center Square Colorado: April 25, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Polis, legislators say Coloradans will get $400 in tax refund this summer
“Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research at the Common Sense Institute, said pushing forward the timeline for getting the TABOR refund will help alleviate some of the pressure imposed by inflation. However, he added, the institute estimate that higher levels of inflation have cost the average Colorado household more than $4,460 since 2021.”
Colorado Politics: April 25, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
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Colorado House advances mobile home protection bill without rent control provision
“A recent analysis of HB22-1287 by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, found that the bill prior to the rent control provision’s removal, could have caused a reduction in the total supply of manufactured homes available and a reduction of state income tax revenue.”
KPVI: April 25, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Sondermann: Truth stranger than fiction
“This May 21, 2020 photo shows a parked car with a broken driver’s side window after a smash-and-grab break in. Property crimes such as these, along with stolen vehicles, are on the rise in Colorado, a 2021 Common Sense Institute report states.”
Colorado Politics: April 24, 2022 by Eric Sondermann
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Electrification: is the Juice Worth the Squeeze?
“As the state continues to regulate and legislate in favor of accelerated climate goals, it fails to acknowledge the global challenges to meeting its targets, which make the tradeoffs nearly impossible to fathom. The reality is, that unless we tell lawmakers to reassess their unrealistic race to electrification, many Coloradans already struggling will find it increasingly difficult to afford to live here.”
Colorado Biz: April 20, 2022 by Evelyn Lim
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What’s Working: Colorado gets closer to pre-pandemic economy as jobless rate falls to 3.7%
“So how does that translate to Coloradans? Try 44,467 in extra spending. That’s how much more the average Colorado household has spent in total since 2020 because of inflation, according to calculations by the Common Sense Institute, a conservative-leaning economic think tank in Greenwood Village. More than half of that amount is due to higher transportation costs, which includes buying or maintaining cars.”
The Colorado Sun: April 16, 2022 by Tamara Chuang
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Colorado’s unemployment rate drops to 3.7% as strong hiring continues in March
“But older workers are also influencing that number, said Steven Byers, a senior economist at the Common Sense Institute in a research note. ‘Inflation in metro Denver reached a 9.1% annual rate in March, the highest pace since 1982. Thats may be causing more retirement-age workers, 65 plus, to re-enter the labor force as they try to maintain their living standards,’ he said.”
The Denver Post: April 15, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
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Colorado unemployment falls again, despite losses of construction jobs
“Leisure and hospitality – the sector that includes industries such as hotels and restaurants – once again led the growth of 5,800 new nonfarm payroll jobs in March with 4,200 new hires, though Common Sense Institute Senior Economist Steven Byers notes it remains 11,600 jobs below pre-pandemic levels.”
Denver Business Journal: April 15, 2022 by Ed Sealover
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Colorado adds 5,800 jobs in March; unemployment rate drops to 3.7%
“However, not all industries benefited from Colorado’s declining unemployment rate in March, according to an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank. The construction industry lost more than 2,300 jobs last month. Other industries like arts, entertainment, and accommodation services have also struggled to regain their employment levels. Arts and entertainment is still missing more than 6,200 jobs when compared to its employment levels from January 2021.”
The Center Square Colorado: April 15, 2022 by Robert Davis Editorial
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Opinion Other Voices: Fentanyl’s collateral damage to our economy
“On Monday, the nonpartisan research organization [Common Sense Institute] detailed how not only did fentanyl-related deaths soar past 800 in 2021 – a 260% increase since 2019 – but since 2017, the share of opioid-related deaths attributed to fentanyl grew from 19% to 73%. It amounted to an $11.1 billion lifetime cost in 2021.”
Greeley Tribune: April 15, 2022 by Greeley Tribune Guest Editorial
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A very important look at the policy of electrification
“Looking through a worldwide prism, Evelyn Lim, a Mike A. Leprino Fellow, pointed out that, ‘Cheap and reliable energy is the key to economic growth, security and general prosperity throughout the world. There are 7.5 billion people in the world and 1.1. billion do not have any access to energy, while 2.9 billion still use solid fuels, such as wood, charcoal, coal and even dung for cooking and heating.'”
The Villager: April 14, 2022 by Freda Miklin
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Fentanyl’s collateral damage to our economy
“‘We don’t have to look any further than the daily news headlines to understand that this is the most tragic public policy issue facing our state today,’ former Denver district attorney and Common Sense Institute Criminal Justice Fellow Mitch Morrissey said in a news statement. ‘In addition to lives, fentanyl overdoses are costing us billions of dollars. We simply cannot ignore this issue.'”
The Gazette: April 14, 2022 by The Gazette editorial board
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Save the American Dream – Make housing affordable
“A recent study by the Common Sense Institute finds the cost of an average starter home has increased by 83% since 2015.”
Colorado Politics: April 14, 2022 by Hugh McKean
Read >>

Denver’s cashless bond system being ‘abused,’ citizens are ‘suffering,’ former DA says
“‘This PR bond system, it’s being abused,’ a fellow with the Common Sense Institute, Mitch Morrissey, told Fox News. ‘It’s being abused by the individuals that are getting the bond, it’s being abused by the magistrates that are issuing the PR bonds. The people of Denver and the state of Colorado are suffering as a result of what they’re doing.'”
Yahoo! News: April 13, 2022 by Lisa Bennatan
Read >>

Denver’s cashless bond system being ‘abused,’ citizens are ‘suffering,’ former DA says
“‘We have about 5,000 people put on PR [personal recognizance] bonds in Denver and that’s what’s going on. Either PR bonds or $1 bonds, you’re going to see an increase in crime because it doesn’t stop the criminal behavior. An important part of setting a bond is protecting the community and it seems in Denver that the courts have lost that factor when it comes to giving PR bonds. They are giving PR bonds to repeat offenders, violent offenders, and people that have criminal records that are caught and arrested with guns, to drug dealers. Those people get arrested and released the next day on a promise to return. Part of the problem is that they do not return, about a third of them don’t come back to court. And when we talk about drug dealers, about half of them don’t come back to court,’ said Mitch Morrissey, a Common Sense Institute Criminal Justice Fellow. ‘That’s a big problem but it’s not the main problem. What’s happening is these individuals are reoffending at a very high rate. Currently in the last two years, four of these offenders have murdered people. They got PR bonds or $1 bonds and they went right out and murdered people.'”
Fox News: April 13, 2022
Read >>

Brauchler 4-13-22 7 am
“‘Well, there are some theories that I happen to agree with. The loose monetary policy we’ve had over the last few years combined with huge fiscal spending at the federal level has resulted in this increased inflation’ said senior economist Steven Byers from the Common Sense Institute. ‘It’s hard to say whether or not it was necessary because we have not had another situation where we’ve locked down the economy, but the Fed thought it was necessary to avoid a huge economic meltdown.'”
The George Brauchler Show (710 KNUS): April 13, 2022 by George Brauchler
Read >>

Officials push for fentanyl felony charge
“According to an analysis from the Common Sense Institute in 2020, Colorado experienced 540 fentanyl related deaths, that’s a 143% increase from 2019. In 2021, there were more than 800 fentanyl related deaths, up 260% from 2019. Now Colorado’s law officials worry if we don’t act now, the numbers will only get worse. With the rising increase in fentanyl related deaths, experts at the Common Sense Institute say, we are losing nearly three Coloradan’s a day to fentanyl, ‘Look fentanyl kills period, more than any other drug that we have seen in a long time,’ George Brauchler, CSI Criminal Justice Fellow says.”
Western Slope Now: April 12, 2022 by Austin Sack
Read >>

Consumer inflation tops 9% in March, metro Denver’s highest rate since 1982
“‘The average Colorado household spent $4,467 more since 2020 because of inflation,’ said Steven Byers, a senior economist with the Common Sense Institute, in an analysis of the inflation numbers.”
The Denver Post: April 12, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
Read >>

Inflation hits 9.1 percent in Denver metro area
“According to an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, the Denver metro area ranks 8th highest in the nation for total inflation since 2020…. ‘Wage growth is not keeping up with inflation and Coloradans’ budgets are being squeezed, causing many people to return to the labor force,’ said Steven Byers, CSI’s chief economist.”
Kiowa County Press: April 12, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

Inflation continues to spike in Denver metro
“The increases in the Denver-Aurora-Lakewood metro ranked eighth out of 23 urban areas since the end of 2020, according to Steven Byers, an economist at the business advocacy organization Common Sense Institute.”
AXIOS Denver: April 12, 2022 by John Frank
Read >>

JJ Ament with The Common Sense Institute on the toll of fentanyl in Denver
“‘The numbers are staggering and the Common Sense Institute report was written in part by two former district attorneys, a republican and a democrat. So bipartisan to address what is an issue we can no longer ignore…. Our employees and employers want a safe and productive work environment. And when that’s impaired when you have illegal drug use sometimes happening just outside the office, sometimes happening on the light rail train to work, and sometimes your walk to work. It’s a workforce issue, a perception issue, a brand issue and a issue for anybody who is considering growing their business or even relocating.'”
KOA Radio: April 12, 2022 by April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz
Read >>

UTIF & PERA: Lawmakers have yet to address two largest fund deficits in state budget, think tank says
“The analysis by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, says that lawmakers have not decided on how they will address the funding shortages in the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund (UITF) and the Public Employees’ Retirement Association (PERA), both of which were heavily taxed during the pandemic.”
The Chronicle-News: April 12, 2022
Read >>

Report: Cost of opioid overdose deaths in Colorado topped $15.2B last year
“The total cost of deaths from opioid overdoses in Colorado topped $15.2 billion last year, according to a new report. In all, Colorado recorded 1,104 opioid-related overdose deaths in 2021, a 127% increase from previous estimates that were released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2017, according to a report by the Common Sense Institute (CSI). Of those deaths, more than 800 were related to fentanyl, a 260% increase from 2019, the report said.”
The Center Square Colorado: April 11, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

Former DAs push for harder fentanyl penalties
“According to the Common Sense Institute, in 2021 there were about 800 fentanyl-related deaths in Colorado, and that is a 260% increase from 2019… ‘We’re almost at three Coloradans a day who die from a fentanyl overdose. Treating this think like its marijuana, or treating it like it’s a speeding ticket, is offensive to the value of human life,’ said former District Attorney George Brauchler, who is now a CSI Criminal Justice Fellow.”
FOX 31 Denver (KDVR): April 11, 2022 by Kim Posey
Read >>

Advocates for stricter penalties for fentanyl press their case
“‘Restoring to felony status the possession of such a deadly substance’ must be part of this bill, JJ Ament insisted…. Like the rest of the country, deaths from fentanyl are skyrocketing in Colorado – from just over 100 in 2018 to more than 800 in 2021, based on a new report released Monday from the Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan institution that is guided by traditionally conservative principles.”
The Denver Gazette: April 11, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
Read >>

Law enforcement and business leaders discuss fentanyl crisis in Colorado
“Statewide, fentanyl related deaths have risen of the last few years at an alarming rate. This according to data from the Common Sense Institute which says 540 people died statewide from fentanyl use from 2019 to 2020, an increase of 143 percent. But when it came to 2021, that number jumped to more than 800 people, an increase of 260 percent. ‘I think we really need to treat fentanyl differently,’ said Mitch Morrissey, former Denver District Attorney. ‘Fentanyl is a deadly and dangerous substance and it needs to be treated as such.'”
KKCO 11 News: April 11, 2022 by Adam Woodbrey
Read >>

South and West lead in recovery of jobs lost during COVID-19. See where your state ranks
“In February, Colorado became the latest to join the club. It has trailed its Mountain West neighbors in jobs growth in part because its Democratic governor imposed tougher social distancing restraints, says Steven Byers, an economist at the Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan research group. Colorado, he says, also passed strict limits on oil and natural gas drilling, intensifying layoffs in the energy-producing state as crude prices crashed in 2020.”
USA Today: April 11, 2022 by Paul Davidson
Read >>

Romer: The intersection of business and public safety
“The Common Sense Institute recently released an update to their “Crime Wave Report” to reflect numbers from 2021. The correlation of increasing crime rates to the public policy decisions of the legislature in recent years is unquestionable. The result, of course, is unhealthy communities across the state — unhealthy economically and an unhealthy sense of security — resulting in an overall diminishment of quality of life.”
Vail Daily: April 7, 2022 by Chris Romer
Read >>

Report: Colorado’s older workers will become more economically important
“The report, conducted by the Common Sense Institute (CS), a free-enterprise think tank, found that Colorado workers over the age of 54 are expected to increase from 20 percent of the workforce in 2020 to more than 25 percent by 2040.”
Kiowa County Press: April 7, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

The cost of crime in Colorado
“On March 29, Common Sense Institute Criminal Justice Fellows Mitch Morrissey and George Brauchler, along with Louisville Police Chief Dave Hayes, participated in a panel discussion on the economic impact of crime in Colorado during 2021. In a report prepared by the Common Sense Institute, research and modeling produced a statewide cost of crime in 2021 of $31 billion. “
The Villager: April 7, 2022 by Freda Miklin
Read >>

Lawmakers have yet to address two largest fund deficits in state budget, think tank says
“The analysis by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, says that lawmakers have not decided on how they will address the funding shortages in the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund (UITF) and the Public Employees’ Retirement Association (PERA), both of which were heavily taxed during the pandemic.
The Daily Sentinel: April 6, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

PERSPECTIVE: Adapting to our aging workforce
“Colorado has the second-fastest aging population in the United States….In the coming years, mature and older workers will play an increasing role in Colorado’s workforce. Consider, between 2010 and 2040, the category of Colorado workers over the age of 54 is expected to grow from one in every five workers, to nearly one in every four. Although Colorado is not unique in facing this changing dynamic, the impacts of the pandemic and the continued labor force shortages have only sharpened the focus of needing a sea change approach to both public and corporate policy to harness the full benefits of the aging workforce.”
The Gazette: April 3, 2022 by Karen Brown and Alexa Eastburg
Read >>

COVER STORY | Unsustainable? Colorado’s government keeps growing
“Data from the Common Sense Institute, which tracks government employment information, show that the state has added more than 10,000 employees from fiscal year 2013 to fiscal year 2022. The high point in the last ten years occurred in fiscal year 2020, when Colorado’s government broke the 60,000 employee mark. In the pervious year, the state funded 58,982 workers. A year later, that rose to 60,986.”
Colorado Politics: April 2, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
Read >>

 

2022 | April

Polis, legislators say Coloradans will get $400 in tax refund this summer
“‘And while higher inflation is putting pressure on all household budgets, it is contributing to strong state revenue growth in combination with the economic recovery from the pandemic, and large federal spending,’ Chris Brown said. ‘So, at a time when General Fund spending is expected to grow 12.7% in next year’s budget, when state reserves are more than double where they were heading into the pandemic, the government spending growth limitation of the TABOR formula has created more than $3.5B in anticipated taxpayer refunds over two years.’
Colorado Politics: April 28, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
Read >>

Colorado lawmakers introduce legislation to put $600M into state unemployment insurance system
An analysis of the plan by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, found that the investment could save Colorado businesses more than $560 million in additional premium payments. J.J. Ament, CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, described the bill as ‘one of the most important pro-business and pro-economy bills that has been introduced this session. By putting this money into the system, it lowers the overall tax on businesses when they hire a new employee,’ Ament said.”
The Center Square: April 27, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

GV plans to make misdemeanor drug possession a municipal violation to impose stiffer penalties
“Earlier in that city council study session, GV Police Chief Dustin Varney presented statewide crime statistics from a December 2021 report issued by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), whose website describes it as a non-partisan research organization dedicated to the protection and promotion of Colorado’s economy. Varney shared that the report said, in part, ‘Colorado has the highest increase in its property crime rate 2011-2020 among all the states,’ Colorado’s violent crime in 2020 was 35% higher than in 2011, nationally the rate grew 3%,’ and ‘Colorado has the highest motor vehicle theft rate among all states in 2020.’”
The Villager: April 27, 2022 by Freda Miklin
Read >>

Colorado lawmakers introduce legislation to put $600M into state unemployment insurance system
“First, as the Common Sense Institute observes, inflation is a driving cause of strong state revenue growth. Colorado’s economy is growing, but that’s in spite of Polis and the Democrats. Their pandemic policies and anti-business legislation and regulations have decimated Colorado businesses and further exacerbated inflation.”
Kiowa County Press: April 27, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

SENGENBERGER | Colorado Dems flip-flop on TABOR?
“First, as the Common Sense Institute observes, inflation is a driving cause of strong state revenue growth. Colorado’s economy is growing, but that’s in spite of Polis and the Democrats. Their pandemic policies and anti-business legislation and regulations have decimated Colorado businesses and further exacerbated inflation.”
Colorado Politics: April 27, 2022 by Jimmy Sengenberger
Read >>

Colorado House advances mobile home protection bill without rent control provision
“A recent analysis of HB22-1287 by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, found that the bill prior to the rent control provision’s removal, could have caused a reduction in the total supply of manufactured homes available and a reduction of state income tax revenue. The think tank said passage of the bill would have opened up ‘a Pandora’s Box allowing for expansion of rent control to other classes of private property, further impinging on private property owners’ rights.'”
The Center Square Colorado: April 25, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

Polis, legislators say Coloradans will get $400 in tax refund this summer
“Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research at the Common Sense Institute, said pushing forward the timeline for getting the TABOR refund will help alleviate some of the pressure imposed by inflation. However, he added, the institute estimate that higher levels of inflation have cost the average Colorado household more than $4,460 since 2021.”
Colorado Politics: April 25, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
Read >>

Colorado House advances mobile home protection bill without rent control provision
“A recent analysis of HB22-1287 by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, found that the bill prior to the rent control provision’s removal, could have caused a reduction in the total supply of manufactured homes available and a reduction of state income tax revenue.”
KPVI: April 25, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

Sondermann: Truth stranger than fiction
“This May 21, 2020 photo shows a parked car with a broken driver’s side window after a smash-and-grab break in. Property crimes such as these, along with stolen vehicles, are on the rise in Colorado, a 2021 Common Sense Institute report states.”
Colorado Politics: April 24, 2022 by Eric Sondermann
Read >>

Electrification: is the Juice Worth the Squeeze?
“As the state continues to regulate and legislate in favor of accelerated climate goals, it fails to acknowledge the global challenges to meeting its targets, which make the tradeoffs nearly impossible to fathom. The reality is, that unless we tell lawmakers to reassess their unrealistic race to electrification, many Coloradans already struggling will find it increasingly difficult to afford to live here.”
Colorado Biz: April 20, 2022 by Evelyn Lim
Read >>

What’s Working: Colorado gets closer to pre-pandemic economy as jobless rate falls to 3.7%
“So how does that translate to Coloradans? Try 44,467 in extra spending. That’s how much more the average Colorado household has spent in total since 2020 because of inflation, according to calculations by the Common Sense Institute, a conservative-leaning economic think tank in Greenwood Village. More than half of that amount is due to higher transportation costs, which includes buying or maintaining cars.”
The Colorado Sun: April 16, 2022 by Tamara Chuang
Read >>

Colorado’s unemployment rate drops to 3.7% as strong hiring continues in March
“But older workers are also influencing that number, said Steven Byers, a senior economist at the Common Sense Institute in a research note. ‘Inflation in metro Denver reached a 9.1% annual rate in March, the highest pace since 1982. Thats may be causing more retirement-age workers, 65 plus, to re-enter the labor force as they try to maintain their living standards,’ he said.”
The Denver Post: April 15, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
Read >>

Colorado unemployment falls again, despite losses of construction jobs
“Leisure and hospitality – the sector that includes industries such as hotels and restaurants – once again led the growth of 5,800 new nonfarm payroll jobs in March with 4,200 new hires, though Common Sense Institute Senior Economist Steven Byers notes it remains 11,600 jobs below pre-pandemic levels.”
Denver Business Journal: April 15, 2022 by Ed Sealover
Read >>

Colorado adds 5,800 jobs in March; unemployment rate drops to 3.7%
“However, not all industries benefited from Colorado’s declining unemployment rate in March, according to an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank. The construction industry lost more than 2,300 jobs last month. Other industries like arts, entertainment, and accommodation services have also struggled to regain their employment levels. Arts and entertainment is still missing more than 6,200 jobs when compared to its employment levels from January 2021.”
The Center Square Colorado: April 15, 2022 by Robert Davis Editorial
Read >>

Opinion Other Voices: Fentanyl’s collateral damage to our economy
“On Monday, the nonpartisan research organization [Common Sense Institute] detailed how not only did fentanyl-related deaths soar past 800 in 2021 – a 260% increase since 2019 – but since 2017, the share of opioid-related deaths attributed to fentanyl grew from 19% to 73%. It amounted to an $11.1 billion lifetime cost in 2021.”
Greeley Tribune: April 15, 2022 by Greeley Tribune Guest Editorial
Read >>

A very important look at the policy of electrification
“Looking through a worldwide prism, Evelyn Lim, a Mike A. Leprino Fellow, pointed out that, ‘Cheap and reliable energy is the key to economic growth, security and general prosperity throughout the world. There are 7.5 billion people in the world and 1.1. billion do not have any access to energy, while 2.9 billion still use solid fuels, such as wood, charcoal, coal and even dung for cooking and heating.'”
The Villager: April 14, 2022 by Freda Miklin
Read >>

Fentanyl’s collateral damage to our economy
“‘We don’t have to look any further than the daily news headlines to understand that this is the most tragic public policy issue facing our state today,’ former Denver district attorney and Common Sense Institute Criminal Justice Fellow Mitch Morrissey said in a news statement. ‘In addition to lives, fentanyl overdoses are costing us billions of dollars. We simply cannot ignore this issue.'”
The Gazette: April 14, 2022 by The Gazette editorial board
Read >>

Save the American Dream – Make housing affordable
“A recent study by the Common Sense Institute finds the cost of an average starter home has increased by 83% since 2015.”
Colorado Politics: April 14, 2022 by Hugh McKean
Read >>

Denver’s cashless bond system being ‘abused,’ citizens are ‘suffering,’ former DA says
“‘This PR bond system, it’s being abused,’ a fellow with the Common Sense Institute, Mitch Morrissey, told Fox News. ‘It’s being abused by the individuals that are getting the bond, it’s being abused by the magistrates that are issuing the PR bonds. The people of Denver and the state of Colorado are suffering as a result of what they’re doing.'”
Yahoo! News: April 13, 2022 by Lisa Bennatan
Read >>

Denver’s cashless bond system being ‘abused,’ citizens are ‘suffering,’ former DA says
“‘We have about 5,000 people put on PR [personal recognizance] bonds in Denver and that’s what’s going on. Either PR bonds or $1 bonds, you’re going to see an increase in crime because it doesn’t stop the criminal behavior. An important part of setting a bond is protecting the community and it seems in Denver that the courts have lost that factor when it comes to giving PR bonds. They are giving PR bonds to repeat offenders, violent offenders, and people that have criminal records that are caught and arrested with guns, to drug dealers. Those people get arrested and released the next day on a promise to return. Part of the problem is that they do not return, about a third of them don’t come back to court. And when we talk about drug dealers, about half of them don’t come back to court,’ said Mitch Morrissey, a Common Sense Institute Criminal Justice Fellow. ‘That’s a big problem but it’s not the main problem. What’s happening is these individuals are reoffending at a very high rate. Currently in the last two years, four of these offenders have murdered people. They got PR bonds or $1 bonds and they went right out and murdered people.'”
Fox News: April 13, 2022
Read >>

Brauchler 4-13-22 7 am
“‘Well, there are some theories that I happen to agree with. The loose monetary policy we’ve had over the last few years combined with huge fiscal spending at the federal level has resulted in this increased inflation’ said senior economist Steven Byers from the Common Sense Institute. ‘It’s hard to say whether or not it was necessary because we have not had another situation where we’ve locked down the economy, but the Fed thought it was necessary to avoid a huge economic meltdown.'”
The George Brauchler Show (710 KNUS): April 13, 2022 by George Brauchler
Read >>

Officials push for fentanyl felony charge
“According to an analysis from the Common Sense Institute in 2020, Colorado experienced 540 fentanyl related deaths, that’s a 143% increase from 2019. In 2021, there were more than 800 fentanyl related deaths, up 260% from 2019. Now Colorado’s law officials worry if we don’t act now, the numbers will only get worse. With the rising increase in fentanyl related deaths, experts at the Common Sense Institute say, we are losing nearly three Coloradan’s a day to fentanyl, ‘Look fentanyl kills period, more than any other drug that we have seen in a long time,’ George Brauchler, CSI Criminal Justice Fellow says.”
Western Slope Now: April 12, 2022 by Austin Sack
Read >>

Consumer inflation tops 9% in March, metro Denver’s highest rate since 1982
“‘The average Colorado household spent $4,467 more since 2020 because of inflation,’ said Steven Byers, a senior economist with the Common Sense Institute, in an analysis of the inflation numbers.”
The Denver Post: April 12, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
Read >>

Inflation hits 9.1 percent in Denver metro area
“According to an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, the Denver metro area ranks 8th highest in the nation for total inflation since 2020…. ‘Wage growth is not keeping up with inflation and Coloradans’ budgets are being squeezed, causing many people to return to the labor force,’ said Steven Byers, CSI’s chief economist.”
Kiowa County Press: April 12, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

Inflation continues to spike in Denver metro
“The increases in the Denver-Aurora-Lakewood metro ranked eighth out of 23 urban areas since the end of 2020, according to Steven Byers, an economist at the business advocacy organization Common Sense Institute.”
AXIOS Denver: April 12, 2022 by John Frank
Read >>

JJ Ament with The Common Sense Institute on the toll of fentanyl in Denver
“‘The numbers are staggering and the Common Sense Institute report was written in part by two former district attorneys, a republican and a democrat. So bipartisan to address what is an issue we can no longer ignore…. Our employees and employers want a safe and productive work environment. And when that’s impaired when you have illegal drug use sometimes happening just outside the office, sometimes happening on the light rail train to work, and sometimes your walk to work. It’s a workforce issue, a perception issue, a brand issue and a issue for anybody who is considering growing their business or even relocating.'”
KOA Radio: April 12, 2022 by April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz
Read >>

UTIF & PERA: Lawmakers have yet to address two largest fund deficits in state budget, think tank says
“The analysis by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, says that lawmakers have not decided on how they will address the funding shortages in the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund (UITF) and the Public Employees’ Retirement Association (PERA), both of which were heavily taxed during the pandemic.”
The Chronicle-News: April 12, 2022
Read >>

Report: Cost of opioid overdose deaths in Colorado topped $15.2B last year
“The total cost of deaths from opioid overdoses in Colorado topped $15.2 billion last year, according to a new report. In all, Colorado recorded 1,104 opioid-related overdose deaths in 2021, a 127% increase from previous estimates that were released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2017, according to a report by the Common Sense Institute (CSI). Of those deaths, more than 800 were related to fentanyl, a 260% increase from 2019, the report said.”
The Center Square Colorado: April 11, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

Former DAs push for harder fentanyl penalties
“According to the Common Sense Institute, in 2021 there were about 800 fentanyl-related deaths in Colorado, and that is a 260% increase from 2019… ‘We’re almost at three Coloradans a day who die from a fentanyl overdose. Treating this think like its marijuana, or treating it like it’s a speeding ticket, is offensive to the value of human life,’ said former District Attorney George Brauchler, who is now a CSI Criminal Justice Fellow.”
FOX 31 Denver (KDVR): April 11, 2022 by Kim Posey
Read >>

Advocates for stricter penalties for fentanyl press their case
“‘Restoring to felony status the possession of such a deadly substance’ must be part of this bill, JJ Ament insisted…. Like the rest of the country, deaths from fentanyl are skyrocketing in Colorado – from just over 100 in 2018 to more than 800 in 2021, based on a new report released Monday from the Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan institution that is guided by traditionally conservative principles.”
The Denver Gazette: April 11, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
Read >>

Law enforcement and business leaders discuss fentanyl crisis in Colorado
“Statewide, fentanyl related deaths have risen of the last few years at an alarming rate. This according to data from the Common Sense Institute which says 540 people died statewide from fentanyl use from 2019 to 2020, an increase of 143 percent. But when it came to 2021, that number jumped to more than 800 people, an increase of 260 percent. ‘I think we really need to treat fentanyl differently,’ said Mitch Morrissey, former Denver District Attorney. ‘Fentanyl is a deadly and dangerous substance and it needs to be treated as such.'”
KKCO 11 News: April 11, 2022 by Adam Woodbrey
Read >>

South and West lead in recovery of jobs lost during COVID-19. See where your state ranks
“In February, Colorado became the latest to join the club. It has trailed its Mountain West neighbors in jobs growth in part because its Democratic governor imposed tougher social distancing restraints, says Steven Byers, an economist at the Common Sense Institute, a nonpartisan research group. Colorado, he says, also passed strict limits on oil and natural gas drilling, intensifying layoffs in the energy-producing state as crude prices crashed in 2020.”
USA Today: April 11, 2022 by Paul Davidson
Read >>

Romer: The intersection of business and public safety
“The Common Sense Institute recently released an update to their “Crime Wave Report” to reflect numbers from 2021. The correlation of increasing crime rates to the public policy decisions of the legislature in recent years is unquestionable. The result, of course, is unhealthy communities across the state — unhealthy economically and an unhealthy sense of security — resulting in an overall diminishment of quality of life.”
Vail Daily: April 7, 2022 by Chris Romer
Read >>

Report: Colorado’s older workers will become more economically important
“The report, conducted by the Common Sense Institute (CS), a free-enterprise think tank, found that Colorado workers over the age of 54 are expected to increase from 20 percent of the workforce in 2020 to more than 25 percent by 2040.”
Kiowa County Press: April 7, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

The cost of crime in Colorado
“On March 29, Common Sense Institute Criminal Justice Fellows Mitch Morrissey and George Brauchler, along with Louisville Police Chief Dave Hayes, participated in a panel discussion on the economic impact of crime in Colorado during 2021. In a report prepared by the Common Sense Institute, research and modeling produced a statewide cost of crime in 2021 of $31 billion. “
The Villager: April 7, 2022 by Freda Miklin
Read >>

Lawmakers have yet to address two largest fund deficits in state budget, think tank says
“The analysis by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, says that lawmakers have not decided on how they will address the funding shortages in the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund (UITF) and the Public Employees’ Retirement Association (PERA), both of which were heavily taxed during the pandemic.
The Daily Sentinel: April 6, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

PERSPECTIVE: Adapting to our aging workforce
“Colorado has the second-fastest aging population in the United States….In the coming years, mature and older workers will play an increasing role in Colorado’s workforce. Consider, between 2010 and 2040, the category of Colorado workers over the age of 54 is expected to grow from one in every five workers, to nearly one in every four. Although Colorado is not unique in facing this changing dynamic, the impacts of the pandemic and the continued labor force shortages have only sharpened the focus of needing a sea change approach to both public and corporate policy to harness the full benefits of the aging workforce.”
The Gazette: April 3, 2022 by Karen Brown and Alexa Eastburg
Read >>

COVER STORY | Unsustainable? Colorado’s government keeps growing
“Data from the Common Sense Institute, which tracks government employment information, show that the state has added more than 10,000 employees from fiscal year 2013 to fiscal year 2022. The high point in the last ten years occurred in fiscal year 2020, when Colorado’s government broke the 60,000 employee mark. In the pervious year, the state funded 58,982 workers. A year later, that rose to 60,986.”
Colorado Politics: April 2, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
Read >>

 

2022 | March

WATCH: Colorado Conversations panel discusses solutions to state’s affordable housing problem
“‘Inventory is devastatingly low, with only 1,486 homes actively listed in the seven-county metro Denver area. That’s down 71% from a year ago,’ said Elizabeth Peetz, vice president of government affairs for the Colorado Association of Realtors. ‘One house’s value jumped from $555,000 to $659,000 from just January to February this year. That’s 84,000 in just 30 days! And it’s not just a Front Range problem — it’s statewide.’ The causes range from the large influx of new residents in recent years, many of whom came during the pandemic since working from home in Colorado can be appealing with its outdoors and active lifestyle, to millennials delaying home buying under the burden of student loans and high rent prices, said Peter LiFari, executive director of Maiker Housing Partners and a former fellow at the Common Sense Institute.”
The Denver Gazette: March 31, 2022 by Dennis Huspeni
Read >>

FLAIR! George Brauchler enlightens and entertains Cherry Creek Republican Women
“Most appropriately he [George Brauchler] talked about crime (not just due to the pandemic, but surging for the last ten years), its cost and the fact government has no long term solution. He called our state ‘Crimerarado.’ Murder. Sexual assault. Car theft – 213% of the national average. Crimes changed to misdemeanors – making it hard to become a convicted felon in Colorado.”
The Villager: March 30, 2022 by The Villager
Read >>

Bill would create program to provide tax-related educational resources
“Inflation has also increased in Colorado in nearly every month since March 2021, according to an analysis by Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank. The only two months where inflation didn’t decrease were August and September 2021.”
The Center Square Colorado: March 29, 2022 by Robert Davis
Read >>

George Brauchler busca ser Gobernador de Colorado
“El Fiscal del Distrito Judicial 18 dijo en entrevista con Noticias Univision Colorado, el por qué quiere ser Gobernador de Colorado y su agenda política.”
Noticias Ya – Denver: March 29, 2022
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Colorado crime cost $31 billion in 2021
“Colorado policy think tank Common Sense Institute put a dollar figure on the costs of Colorado crime in 2021 in a new report…. In 2021, the state lost $31 billion in medical, mental health, lost economic productivity, property, public services, adjudication and sanctioning, perpetrator work loss and quality of life. This is 12.9% more than the same costs of crime in 2021, although record inflation levels mean the two years are roughly the same in real dollar value.”
KDVR Fox 31: March 28, 2022 by DJ Summers
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Colorado crime rates spiked across the board with 3 exceptions
“Colorado policy think tank the Common Sense Institute put a dollar figure on the costs and trends of crime in 2021 in a new report. The report was bipartisan, written by former Republican District Attorney George Brauchler and former Democratic District Attorney Mitch Morrissey. Colorado’s crime rates have gone up in a dozen categories but only gone down in three between 2020 and 2021.”
KDVR Fox 31: March 28, 2022 by DJ Summers
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Report: Colorado’s Crime Wave Grew Stronger in 2021
“According to a new study released from the Common Sense Institute, Colorado’s crime wave grew stronger in 2021, with an increase of 8.7% – more than double of 2020’s 4% increase. In 2021, the total cost of crime in Colorado reached over $31 billion, a 12.9% increase from the cost in 2020. That averages out to $5,320 per Coloradan.”
Campfire Colorado: March 28, 2022
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Tune in to the Colorado Conversations on housing affordability on March 31
“The Common Sense Institute said the state needs to build 54,190 new housing units annually over the next five years just to get back to the average housing to population ratio between 1986 and 2008. But Peter LiFari, a 2021 Terry J. Stevinson Fellow at the Common Sense Institute and executive director of the affordable housing developer Maiker Housing Partners, argues that the causes of Colorado’s housing crisis are far more nuanced than supply and demand.”
Colorado Politics: March 25, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
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What is going on with our criminal justice system?
“‘We don’t have to go back ten years to see what took place in 2014 and the years subsequent have led to this crime tsunami, in my opinion. That doesn’t have to be shared by everyone…. While we’ve watered down motor vehicle theft laws, we saw a spike in motor vehicle theft. Such that ten years ago we were below the national average and now, no state in America has a higher rate of motor vehicle theft than your beloved Colorado… My thought is we have got to tackle some of these things by creating a disincentive while also embracing the fact that rehabilitation is our ultimate goal for these offenders.’ Said George Brauchler, CSI’s Criminal Justice Fellow.”
The George Show with George Brauchler: March 25, 2022 by George Brauchler
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Report: Colorado’s older workers will become more economically important 
“Older workers in Colorado will play a bigger part in the state’s economic future if demographic trends continue, according to a new report. The report, conducted by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, found that Colorado workers over the age of 54 are expected to increase from 20% of the workforce in 2020 to more than 25% by 2040.”
The Chronicle-News: March 25, 2022
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Editorial: Police staffing at crisis levels. A new Boulder academy will help
“Boulder County’s violent crime has risen 27% in recent years between 2019 and 2021, according to the Colorado Bureau of Investigation. And according to a study by the nonpartisan Common Sense Institute, we are experiencing a crime wave in Colorado with dire economic consequences.”
Boulder Daily Camera: March 26, 2022 by Daily Camera Editorial
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Report: Total cost of crime in Colorado increased to $31B last year
“The Common Sense Institute’s (CSI) updated report found that crime in the state cost taxpayers an estimated $31 billion last year, up nearly 13% from 2020. The total amounts to $5,320 per Coloradan, an increase of $560 year-over-year.”
The Center Square Colorado: March 25, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Colorado unemployment rate dips to 4% as state adds 14,100 jobs
“According to an analysis of CDLE’s data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, Colorado ranks 11th among the states in terms of its February 2022 job levels relative to its January 2020 levels.”
The Center Square Colorado: March 25, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Tune in to the Colorado Conversations on housing affordability on March 31
“Data from the Common Sense Institute paint a dispiriting landscape: In May 2021, home listings in the Denver metro area stood at a record low 2,075, when the monthly average hovered at 15,563. The 12-month price of the average single-family home sold spiked by 29% – closing at $700,559!… The Common Sense Institute said the state needs to build 54,190 new housing units annually over the next five years just to get back to the average housing to population ratio between 1986 and 2008.”
Colorado Politics: March 25, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
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Opinion: Mobile home park residents will suffer is rent is capped
If park owners can no longer afford to operate, they may be forced to sell or close, putting this affordable housing option at risk. Furthermore, the average mobile home rent increases are far below increases in other types of housing options. According to the Common Sense Institute, inflation rates have risen in the Denver metro area to 7.9%. But even amid inflation, mobile home rents remain affordable.”
The Denver Post: March 23, 2022 by Tawny Peyton
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Report: Colorado’s older workers will become more economically important
“The report also cites an AARP study that found the economic impact of the state’s aging workforce could increase to $513 billion in 2040, up from $153 billion in 2018. CSI’s report comes as Colorado’s economy continues to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. According to data from Connecting Colorado, a partner of the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE), there are nearly 150,000 available jobs in Colorado.”
Kiowa County Press: March 22, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Report: Colorado’s older workers will become more economically important
“The report conducted by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, found that Colorado workers over age of 54 are expected to increase from 20% of the workforce in 2020 to more than 25% by 2040. ‘In many ways Colorado’s demographic make-up is catching up with the national trend and averages of an aging population. The impact of this trend is that a larger and larger share of the labor pool will be workers over the age of 55, with those over the age of 65 growing at the fastest rate,’ said Chris Brown, CSI’s vice president of policy and research.”
The Center Square Colorado: March 21, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Republican lawmakers in Colorado urge ramping up of oil production to combat high energy prices
“Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg added that inflation, under the failed policies of the Democratic governor and the Biden administration, is going to cost everyone more money. He cited a recent Common Sense Institute study that said the average hike in costs per family in 2021 was bout $2,900 more for food, recreation, housing, transportation and medical care over 2020 prices. ‘The cost of living has reached a crisis point,’ Sonnenberg said.”
Colorado Politics: March 16, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
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Denver Lags Behind the State Average of Economic Recovery
“While Colorado’s taxable sales in 2021 have surpassed pre-pandemic levels, according to a new study from the Common Sense Institute, Denver County reported a decrease in taxable sales…’Taxable sales are one gage of economic recovery and by that measure, Colorado has reached recovery. State and local sales tax revenue has grown well beyond pre-pandemic levels,’ said Senior Economist at the Common Sense Institute, Steven Byers, in a press release.”
Campfire Colorado: March 16, 2022
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Colorado unemployment rate declines to 4.1%
“For comparison, the national unemployment rate increased by 0.1% to 4% in January. According to an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, Colorado ranks 12th among states for its January job level compared to two years ago.”
The Center Square Colorado: March 14, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Colorado has recovered 98% of jobs lost in pandemic, as unemployment rate drops to 4.1%
“While more people are part of the state’s labor force, Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows there are still around 132,000 Coloradans who are unemployed, compared with 86,000 who were unemployed in February 2020. That only counts people who are working or actively looking for a job, said Steven Byers, a senior economist for Common Sense Institute, a Greenwood Village think tank focused on the state’s fiscal policies.”
The Colorado Sun: March 14, 2022 by Tamara Chuang
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Amid rising violent crime, Colorado bill aims to improve lighting in high-crime areas 
“The bills introduced comes at a time of rising crime. Colorado experienced a 15% increase in crime from 2019-2021, and the average monthly crime rate in 2021 is 28% higher than it was in 2011, according to a study by the Common Sense Institute.”
Colorado Springs, Colo. (KRDO): March 12, 2022 by Sean Rice
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Report: Colorado taxable sales total points to full economic recovery 
“Taxable sales in Colorado have already fully recovered from the pandemic, a new report by the Common Sense Institute found. According to the report, Colorado recorded more than $131 billion in nominal annual taxable sales – which includes taxable goods and services – last year. That total exceeded the state’s total from 2020 by more than $20 billion, representing a 18.8% year-over-year increase.”
The Center Square Colorado: March 9, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Common Sense Institute and taxable sales
“There was a new report that came out of the Common Sense Institute that said that of all of the major counties in and around Denver, Denver is the only one that has lower sales tax revenue than they did two years ago. Everyone else’s work more than recovered but not whatever is going on in Denver.”
KAO-AM Radio (Denver, CO): March 9, 2022 by Ross Kaminsky
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Common Sense Institute expanding in Arizona
“A nonpartisan Colorado think tank focused on protecting and promoting the economy is expanding right here in Arizona. Strategic adviser Daniel Scarpinato says the Common Sense Institute Arizona will have a different focus from other think tanks. Common Sense Institute is focused on ‘if you pass that, here’s the impact it would have on our economy over the next year.’ Said Scarpinato.”
KFYI-AM Radio (Phoenix, AZ): March 8, 2022
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Don’t Colorado My Arizona
“A think tank with roots in Colorado will launch in Arizona tomorrow. The Common Sense Institute plans to ‘examine the fiscal impacts of policies, initiatives, and proposed laws so that Arizonans are educated and informed on issues impacting their lives.’ Common Sense Arizona identifies itself as a nonpartisan research organization. T. Scott Martin, managing partner at Rivercrest Capital Management, the founding chair of the board, said in a statement that the current ‘partisan and divisive political atmosphere’ makes it difficult to get basic facts. ‘At CSI, we are guided by non-partisan dynamic research,’ Martin stated. ‘We don’t advocate – we educate.'”
Yellow Sheet Report – Arizona: March 7, 2022 by Bridgetower Media
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State task force refers 17 unemployment fraud cases for prosecution
“According to an analysis of the state’s unemployment trust fund by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, the system became overwhelmed during the pandemic because of the number of unemployment claims it received.”
The Center Square Colorado: March 7, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Common Sense Institute expands Operations to Arizona
“Kristin Strohm said that – not to engage in electioneering or lobby for or against a legislative proposal – makes CSI’s work unique and valuable, particularly at a time when legislatures often contend with partisan rancor. ‘We’ve proven to be a much needed resource at the state level,’ Strohm said, noting CSI’s research into a wide array of public policy matters, notably education, the economy and state budget.”
Colorado Politics: March 7, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
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Colorado committee advances legislation addressing retail theft, online crime
“The rising crime rate has also taken a toll on taxpayers in the state, according to a study by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank, which found that crime cost Colorado more than $27 billion in 2020, or more than $4,700 per taxpayer.”
The Center Square Colorado: March 3, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Colorado must curb inflation now
“A recent report by the Common Sense Institute confirms what families cross Colorado already know; unprecedented inflation is sweeping across out state. Families, already stretched thin by the pandemic, are now at a breaking point trying to make ends meet. According to the Common Sense Institute (CSI) report, Coloradans spent almost $3,000 more on essentials like food, housing, medical care, and transportation in 2021 than in 2020.”
The Gazette: March 2, 2022 by Kelly Maher
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Crime and Justice: The Colorado Challenge
“‘Well in the Common Sense Institute study that we did on crime, we went back about 10 years. One of the questions we wanted to know was ‘Did the pandemic cause this crime wave?’… ‘Colorado in that period of time is not only number one in auto thefts, but it’s also number one in the increase in property crimes.’ Said Mitch Morrissey, Common Sense Institute’s Criminal Justice Fellow in a panel lead by The Gazette and Colorado Politics.”
The Gazette: March 2, 2022 by Luige del Puerto
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Discussion about crime continues with ‘Colorado Conversations’
“Law enforcement officials are concerned with recidivism, especially among people who have committed violent crimes. Mitch Morrisseyu, Denver’s district attorney until 2017 and a fellow at the Common Sense Institute, said that since a relatively small group of people who are repeat offenders tend to commit a disproportionate share of serious crimes, focusing on incarceration of habitual offenders helps reduce recidivism.”
The Gazette: March 1, 2022 by Julia Cardi
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2022 | February

Jimmy Sengenberger Show – February 26, 2022 – HR 2
“‘I think the most obvious thing it will do is have me focus on data related solutions instead of opinion type solutions. If you can analyze a policy or situation unbiased and come to conclusions or solutions that are supportable by the data then I think you have a really good chance in moving the argument in a way that benefits Colorado.’ Said Steven Byers, Common Sense Institute’s Senior Economist in an interview with Jimmy Sengenberger.”
710 KNUS Jimmy Sengenberger Show: February 26, 2022 by Jimmy Sengenberger
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Fentanyl is a killer; let’s make it a felony
“If there is any doubt where such public policies are leading us, just look at the numbers. A recent study by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute found that violent crime in our state soared 35 percent from 2011 to 2020 while rising only 3 percent nationwide in that time. Colorado’s 2020 murder rate was 106 percent higher than it was in 2011. Assaults surged 40 percent in that same time. Rape rose 9 percent. We’ve also become the No. 1 state for auto thefts.”
Colorado Politics: February 25, 2022 by Gregory M. Knott, Anthony Mazzola and Stephen Schulz
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Rise in crime impacting Denver area businesses
“‘A Common Sense Institute study found that there were just two bonds, a dollar or less pre-pandemic in 2019 that were given to people. There were 500 plus given to people in 2021. And these are the things that people are saying need fixed’ said Ed Sealover, a Senior Reporter with the Denver Business Journal.”
9News: February 22, 2022 by Ryan Frazier
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Colorado Conversations: Why is crime out of control? What can be done about it?
“A recent study found that violent crime in our state skyrocketed 35% in the last decade – while rising only 3% nationwide… And those experts promise to bring a variety of informed perspectives to this debate. They are Paul Pazen, Chief of the Denver Police Department; Sen. Rhonda Fields, chair of the Senate Health & Human Services Committee; former district attorney Mitch Morrissey, a Criminal Justice Fellow at the Common Sense Institute; and, Dr. Lisa Pasko, Chair of the Department of Sociology and Criminology, University of Denver.”
The Gazette: February 22, 2022 by Vince Bzdek
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Toward a statewide consensus on affordable housing
“Transformation means disrupting the status quo, which requires articulating a clear problem statement, and in this regard the [housing task force committee] report gets it half right. Colorado does have an affordable housing supply shortage. The results have impacted all Coloradans. And we have a significant allocation of federal funding to help us address it…We commend the chair and the sponsors for engaging in the amendment process, which narrows the bill to focus solely on outlawing local anti-growth laws.”
Colorado Politics: February 16, 2022 by Peter LiFari and Evelyn Lim
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Colorado looking to take statewide approach to homelessness
“An August report from the Common Sense Institute and the University of Colorado Denver’s Inworks initiative found that area governments and nonprofit agencies spend at least $481.2 million annually on services for individuals experiencing homelessness, ranging from shelters to transitional housing and including food provision, health care and case management. But it also found that those organizations sometimes operated in silos, putting the same resources to overlapping services without research as to whether the efforts were working optimally.”
Denver Business Journal: February 14, 2022 by Ed Sealover
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Colorado governor tries to fight highest inflation in nation with cuts on gas, services
“‘High inflation erodes savings and increases that costs of daily commutes, groceries and other consumer goods. This threatens the financial health of Colorado citizens and the strength and swiftness of the state’s ongoing economic recovery,’ Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research at Common Sense Institute, told the Colorado Sun.”
FOX Business: February 13, 2022 by Peter Aitken
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Sondermann | The crime-induced winter of our discontent
“Welcome to Colorado in early 2022 and the winter of our discontent. This time, the downcast spirit has less to do with a virus or gas price or even a potential conflicting eastern Europe than with a sense, supported by abundant evidence, that serious crime is rampant and our basic security is at some rick. The murder rate across Colorado in 2020 was more than double that of ten years prior. The largest spike was in 2019 and 2020 with an average monthly increase of over 20 percent.”
The Gazette: February 13, 2022 by Eric Sondermann
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What’s Working: Colorado’s inflation rate is higher than the nation’s
“‘High inflation erodes savings and increases the costs of daily commutes, groceries and other consumer goods. This threatens the financial health of Colorado citizens and the strength and swiftness of the state’s ongoing economic recovery,’ according to CSI’s report.”
The Colorado Sun: February 12, 2022 by Tamara Chuang
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Colorado Inside out: Live Stream
‘I 100% do. I do want to give a shoutout to CSI fellows George Brauchler and Mitch Morrissey for their groundbreaking work, it’s important for viewers to know the facts. The facts are that the total cost of crime, in this state in 2020, was over $27 billion. Colorado had the highest increase in property crime rate, our 2020 murder rate is 106% higher than it was ten years ago and we had the highest motor vehicle theft rate. Those are the facts. However, some policymakers and even some media outlets say crime isn’t as bad as we think and they’ve flushed over this data,’ said Kristin Strohm, CSI President and CEO.”
Colorado Inside Out PBS 12: February 11, 2022 by Dominic Dezzutti
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Consumer inflation heats up to nearly 8% a year in metro Denver
“‘The average Colorado household spent $2,900 more on food, housing, transportation, medical care, recreation and education over the past 12 months than in 2020. The 2022 impact on spending will be even more,’ said Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research at the Common Sense Institute, a business-funded think tank, in a research note on the latest numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.”
The Denver Post: February 11, 2022 by Aldo Svaldi
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Inflation in the Denver metro area reached a record high in January
“Inflation in the Denver metro area reached 7.9% in January, the highest ever recorded total, according to the latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Households across the metro area paid more than $2,900 more on average for housing, transportation, and food last year compared to 2020. These items account for more than 80% of average household expenditures, according to an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank.”
The Center Square Colorado: February 11, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Inflation in the Denver metro area reached a record high in January
“Households across the metro area paid more than $2,900 more on average for housing, transportation, and food last year compared to 2020. These items account for more than 80% of average household expenditures, according to an analysis of the data by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank.”
The Daily Sentinel: February 11, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Inflation in Denver metro hits record high, outpaces U.S.
“By the numbers: The average Colorado household spent $2,900 more on food, housing, transportation, medical care and education in 2021 compared to 2020, according to a report from Chris Brown at the conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute.”
AXIOS Denver: February 10, 2022 by John Frank
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Law enforcement groups withhold support for Polis’ public safety pitch
“The package comes as Colorado and particularly areas such as downtown Denver has seen a spike in crimes over the past three years, with a Common Sense Institute study finding that motor vehicle theft in the state jumped 39% in 2020 alone.”
Denver Business Journal: February 10, 2022 by Ed Sealover
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Law enforcement groups withhold support for Polis’ public safety pitch
“Republican Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers said the 2022 legislative session is likely to produce more proposals that would ‘undermine public safety,’ citing a study from the Denver-based Common Sense Institute, which found that the average monthly crime rate in Colorado is 15% higher in 2021 than the year before, and 28% higher than it was a decade ago.”
The Denver Gazette: February 10, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
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Colorado bill takes aim at online marketplace after big-box stores sound alarm on crime
“The business-focused Common Sense Institute found in a report it released in early December on the cost of crime that 67% of all property asset managers in Colorado reported a moderate to severe increase in property crimes – the kinds that most affect business – in 2020. CSI Vice President of Policy and Research Chris Brown pegged the overall cost of crime to Colorado business in that year at $27.49 billion.”
Denver Business Journal: February 9, 2022 by Ed Sealover
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Murrey: State government outpaces private sector under one-party rule
“A new report by the Common Sense Institute reveals how one-party control of Colorado has ballooned the growth in state government as private sector employment has stagnated. According to the report, the number of people employed by the government of Colorado has grown nearly eight times as much as private employment since the state fell under single-party control in 2019.”
Complete Colorado: February 9, 2022 by Ben Murrey
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As Colorado sees an increase in violent crime, some elected officials differ widely on thoughts as to why
“Leaders in law enforcement and elected officials in the Pikes Peak region recently raised the alarm about increasing rates of violent crime both locally and statewide. The concern stems from a report by the Denver-based Common Sense Institute that puts the blame for the increase on changes in legislation.”
Colorado Public Radio: February 9, 2022 by Abigail Beckman
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Colorado car theft statistics the worst in the country, according to report  
“In December 2021, an economic analysis of crime in Colorado, by the Common Sense Institute, reported that only other places in the U.S. with higher auto theft rates was Washington D.C.. The analysis found that the annual cost of these thefts approaches $1 billion.”
Out There Colorado: February 8, 2022 by Tamera Twitty
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Editorial: As criminals go free, killings soar in Denver
“A recent, groundbreaking study on the crime wave by two prominent former district attorneys for Colorado’s Common Sense Institute found the number of convicts behind bars at Colorado prisons had dropped an astounding 23% from 2008 to this year – while the total number of crimes per year exploded by 47%. Is it any wonder?”
The Denver Gazette: February 6, 2022 by the Gazette editorial board
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Top priority: Stop Colorado’s Crime wave
“Consider crime. It’s an issue at the top of the list for many Coloradans. According to a study released by the non-partisan Common Sense Institute (CSI) we are living in the midst of a crime wave. In fact, some news headlines have gone so far to call this a ‘crime tsunami’. Colorado had the highest increase in its property crime rate between 2011 and 2020, among all states. Colorado’s violent crime rate in 2020 was 35% higher than 2011, and the 2020 murder rate was also 106% higher than 2011. The rape rate was 9%, higher with assault up 40%. Even more staggering, Colorado ranks number one in the nation when it comes to auto theft.”
Colorado Politics: February 4, 2022 by Hugh McKean
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Report: State government employment has grown 20% over last decade
“The governor’s last budget request would increase state government employment by 0.85% overall, though several agencies would see growth rates of 6% or higher, according to the report by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank…’Over the past 10 years, there has been a significant difference in the employment growth across the state government agencies,’ said Chris Brown, CSI’s vice president of policy and research. ‘Examining which departments are slated for the largest growth curve in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE) employment can help us understand long-term commitments on our state budget.'”
The Center Square Colorado: February 3, 2022 by Robert Davis
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2022 | January

Sharf: Catalytic converter bill hits wrong target
“The reasons aren’t hard to pin down. Insurance companies link much of the increase to organized crime, with rings subsidizing the thieves’ drug habits. A recent report by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute linked the crime wave to lenient law enforcement by district attorneys including proliferation of $1 personal recognizance bonds. We can agree about the need to reform an unfair cash bail system, but right now, the average citizen is paying the price for this blinkered version of social justice.”
Complete Colorado: January 31, 2022 by Joshua Sharf
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Perspective: Will unemployment insurance crush Colorado’s job creators?
“According to a new analysis issued by Common Sense Institute (CSI), a non-partisan research organization, between 2023 and 2027, Colorado employers stand to pay $5.3 billion more in state and federal unemployment insurance taxes than they would at the pre-pandemic 2020 baseline.”
The Gazette: January 30, 2022 by Loren Furman and Kristin Strohm
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Crime on the rise? As Perception and reports of crime in downtown Denver rise, leaders spread blame
“A criminal justice report released in December by the nonpartisan, business-focused Common Sense Institute pinned the cost of crime in Colorado at $27.49 billion – $8.51 billion in direct costs and $19.2 billion in intangible costs like reduced quality of life and setbacks in job development. That’s $4,762 for each Colorado resident and equal to 77% of the annual state budget…’There has been an increasingly permissive approach to violations of the law. We’ve made it so difficult to be kept in jail or sentenced to prison for these crimes that over time it makes a zero-deterrent effect,’ said former 18th Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler.”
Denver Business Journal: January 28, 2022 by Ed Sealover
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Romer: Why replenishing unemployment insurance trust fund is important
“From the Common Sense Institute: Colorado’s unemployment levels spiked in early 2020 and caused the state’s unemployment insurance trust fund to become deeply insolvent. As of July 2021, the fun’s balance is $1.014 billion and is not projected to become solvent until the 2024 fiscal year. Because employers are responsible for paying payroll taxes to the trust fund, a depleted fund forces Colorado businesses to pay high payroll taxes on each employee and incur financial harm as a result.”
Colorado Politics: January 27, 2022 by Chris Romer
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Colorado’s job recovery lags behind neighboring states
“Chris Brown, Vice President of Policy and Research at the Common Sense Institute, said a few factors might help explain Colorado’s lag. First, he noted that Colorado experienced a steeper employment decline in 2020 compared to the four states. Employment declined 13.3% in April 2020 in Colorado… Second, Brown noted, that among the five states, Colorado is the only one whose employment declined at the end of 2020.”
Colorado Politics: January 25, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
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Business leaders call for state to replenish unemployment fund
“Compared to 2020, employers in Colorado could face $5.3 billion more in state and federal payroll taxes between 2023 and 2027, according to a Jan. 17 report published by the Common Sense Institute, a non-partisan research group that examines state fiscal policy. The $600 million state allocation that Polis proposed would save employers in the state $560 million over that period, the report said… Colorado is one of nine states in outstanding debt to the federal government after taking a loan to pay unemployment claims after the state’s Unemployment Insurance Fund was depleted.”
The Colorado Springs Business Journal: January 25, 2022 by Greta Anderson
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Report: Denver saw significant increase in unsheltered homelessness in 2021
“A recent study of Denver’s homeless service ecosystem by the Common Sense Institute, a free-enterprise think tank found that Denver has more than 85 service organizations directed towards reducing homelessness. Another study by the organization found that the city spends more than half a billion dollars on services for people experiencing homelessness.”
The Center Square Colorado: January 24, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Building Homes In Fire Zones + INC Meeting Today + Car Theft Up
“Metro Denver is one of the worst places in the country for auto theft. A new report from the Common Sense Institute, shows that auto theft is on the rise in the Denver area. There were more than 27,000 motor vehicle thefts across the metro areas in 2020, the most in over a decade.”
Patch: January 22, 2022 by Brad K. Evans
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Home Products: The Best Gear to Defend Your Home | Home & Hood
“Overall, crime rates in Colorado continue to increase, according to the Common Sense Institute, ‘Colorado had the highest increase in its property crime rate between 2011 and 2020. Partly due to the pandemic, policy restrictions and resulting economic disruptions brought further stress to society, which exacerbated problems related to crime.’ Nonetheless, Colorado’s crime rate had continued to climb before the pandemic hit.”
Yellow Scene Magazine: January 20, 2022 by Laurenz Busch
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75 Colorado businesses urge Legislature to pass unemployment relief plan
“The urgent letter came just six days after the beginning of the 2022 legislative session, but it also came one day after the Common Sense Institute released an analysis estimating the cost to employers from increased fees and taxes needed to refill the UITF (Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund). The report determined that putting Polis’ proposed plan into place would save companies $560 million because of the way it would avert some fees and lower other employer costs, and that move could preserve 4,700 in jobs in 2025, the business-focused think0tank determined.”
Denver Business Journal: January 20, 2022 by Ed Sealover
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Republicans and Democrats roll out plans for affordability, public safety and education
“‘It has been very frustrating for law enforcement in Colorado over the last several years to watch criminal consequences being reduced and serious offenders being released early with little or no regard for consequences to public safety. Despite a growing population and rising crime rates, our prison population has been reduced by 23 percent over the last decade. That is a recipe for chaos, when you consider that during that same period the total number of annual crimes increased by 47 percent. A significant percentage of our crimes in Colorado are being committed by people out on bond or on probation or parole.’ said Mayor John Suthers. The statistics Suthers cited come from a December 2021 report from the Common Sense Institute, co-authored by George Brauchler and Mitch Morrissey.”
Colorado Springs INDY: January 19, 2022 by Heidi Beedle
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Colorado businesses press state lawmakers for $600 million in unemployment relief
“Employers face $5.3 billion in extra unemployment insurance payroll taxes between 2023 and 2027, compared to the baseline in 2020, according to the Common Sense Institute, a research group funded by the chamber. ‘The impacts of this tax are tremendous, and though necessary to rebuild our unemployment insurance system, they will slow the efforts to revive our economy,’ said CSI vice president of policy and research Chris Brown, who authored the study.”
The Lamar Ledger: January 19, 2022 by Megan Ulu Lani Boyanton
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Colorado businesses worry about looming unemployment insurance hike
“The chamber cited a study by the Common Sense Institute ‘indicating that compared to a 2020 baseline, Colorado employers face $3.5 billion in additional state and federal unemployment insurance payroll taxes between 2023 and 2027.'”
The Denver Gazette: January 18, 2022 by Dennis Huspeni
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Colorado Governor Waxes Optimistic in ‘State of the State’ Speech
“Democrats also plan to address increasing crime rates this year as they counter Republicans’ narrative that their policies are making the state less safe. Colorado had the highest rate of motor vehicle theft among all states in 2020, according to FBI data analyzed by the conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute. During a part of his speech that addressed public safety, Polis discussed initiatives planned to address ‘root causes’ of crime, such as homelessness and substance use disorders, to prevent people from breaking the law.”
Pagosa Daily Post: January 18, 2022 by Post Contributor
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Report: Governor’s unemployment insurance fund proposal could save Colorado employers over $560M
“The report by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank, found that the governor’s proposed investment could return savings of more than $560 million for businesses over the next six years. Colorado business owners are on the hook for more than $5.3 billion in state and federal unemployment insurance payroll taxes from 2023 to 2027, with more than $73 million resulting from fraudulent claims, the report said.”
The Center Square Colorado: January 18, 2022 by Robert Davis
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Gov. Polis in optimistic State of the State speech: ‘I’m feelin’ ’22’
“Democrats also plan to address increasing crime rates this year as they counter Republicans’ narrative that their policies are making the state less safe. Colorado had the highest rate of motor vehicle theft among all states in 2020, according to FBI data analyzed by the conservative-leaning Common Sense Institute. During a part of his speech that addressed public safety, Polis discussed initiatives planned to address ‘root causes’ of crime, such as homelessness and substance use disorders, to prevent people from breaking the law.”
Colorado Newsline: January 14, 2022 by Faith Miller
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Crime rate in Colorado soars
“According to a recent report violent crime has increased by 30% over the last decade in Colorado. The report produced by the Common Sense Institute a nonpartisan research organization also showed Colorado had the highest increase in property crime rate between 2011 and 2020 in the nation. The report published last month acknowledged the fact pandemic-related policies and restrictions that resulted in economic disruptions brought further stress to society as a whole which ‘exacerbated problems related to crime’.”
Berthoud Weekly Surveyor: January 13, 2022 by Amber Mclver-Traywick
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Colorado Springs Gazette: Job No. 1 for Colorado lawmakers – fight crime
“Our state in fact ranks first in the nation for auto theft. We also have been awash in a wave of violence. A recent, groundbreaking study by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute found the monthly crime rate in Colorado was 15% higher in 2021 than two years earlier – and 28% higher than it was a decade ago. The 2020 murder rate was 106% higher than in 2011. Alongside skyrocketing crime in Colorado is the fact that the number of criminals behind bars in our state has been plummeting at a similarly alarming rate.”
Colorado Politics: January 13, 2022 by Colorado Springs Gazette editorial board
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Editorial: Job No. 1 for Colorado lawmakers – fight crime
“Our state in fact ranks first in the nation for auto theft. We also have been awash in a wave of violence. A recent, groundbreaking study by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute found the monthly crime rate in Colorado was 15% higher in 2021 than two years earlier – and 28% higher than it was a decade ago.”
The Gazette: January 13, 2022 by The Gazette editorial board
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Polis won’t say if he met with Kardashian, others over controversial commutation
“‘Where is it written that they get to have secrets about who gives them advice?’ said George Brauchler, who served as the District Attorney for the 18th Judicial District and co-authored a study from the Denver-based Common Sense Institute about soaring crime rates in the state.”
Colorado Politics: January 12, 2022 by Luige Del Puerto
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Western States College of Construction is an Exciting New Trade School
“In a recent panel discussion at the Common Sense Institute (CSI), Dave Davia, CSI board member and CEO of the Rocky Mountain Mechanical Contractors Association, talked about the WSSC [Western States College of Construction], where he is also a board member. Davia said ‘It’s no secret that in the 1980’s and 1990’s, shop class, wood class, automotive…were taken out of our K-12 (education) system, so the visibility to the trades was diminished. The only way that someone would learn about the possibility of a career path in the trades was to have an uncle or aunt or somebody in the profession.”
The Villager: January 12, 2022 by Freda Miklin
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Pikes Peak law enforcement, Mayor Suthers criticize Colorado legislators’ approach to crime
“In a news briefing, Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers said the 2022 legislative session is likely to produce more proposals that would ‘undermine public safety,’ citing a study from the Denver-based Common Sense Institute, which found that the average monthly crime rate in Colorado is 15% higher in 2021 than the year before, and a stunning 28% higher than it was a decade ago….State Senator Pete Lee said the Common Sense Institute report looks at an outcome that has many causes, not just legislation, much of it so new it hasn’t had time to affect the dire numbers.”
Colorado Politics: January 11, 2022 by Jessica Snouwaert
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Colorado legislature convene this week, with ambitious, competing goals
“A recent report from the Common Sense Institute said Colorado’s crime rates are soaring, notably in property crimes and auto thefts. Colorado, the report noted, led the nation in its rates of increased property crimes and, separately, auto thefts in 2020. Meanwhile, the violent crime rate spiked 35% over the figure from 2011, while nationally, the increase was just 3%.”
The Gazette: January 10, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
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Local law enforcement, Mayor Suthers criticize Colorado legislators’ approach to crime
“In a news briefing, Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers said the 2022 legislative session is likely to produce more proposals that would ‘undermine public safety,’ citing a study from the Denver-based Common Sense Institute, which found that the average monthly crime rate in Colorado is 15% higher in 2021 than the year before, and a stunning 28% higher than it was a decade ago.”
The Gazette: January 10, 2022 by Jessica Snouwaert
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Colorado’s crime wave and marijuana policies
“Coloradans’ concerns about public safety are growing, and for good reason. Former District Attorneys George Brauchler and Mitch Morrissey recently pointed out startling increases in crime from 2011-2020: a 35% jump in violent crime, and a historic rise in property crimes.”
Greeley Tribune: January 8, 2022 by Luke Niforatos
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“Common Sense Institute” on 600 KCOL – Denver, CO
“…as a state-level advocate on economic issues that affect ordinary citizens and small businesses here and that’s a fairly wide range, you’re probably familiar with the Common Sense Institute, which is some really, really sober data-based studies on a number of issues. And, you know, crock crime and homelessness, which you don’t normally consider to be part of the treasurer’s purview nonetheless have a huge impact on the economic viability of the state…”
KCOL: January 7, 2022
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COVER STORY | Legislative leaders set agenda, priorities for 2022 session
“A recent report from the Common Sense Institute said Colorado’s crime rates are soaring, notably in property crimes and auto thefts, and the criminal justice reformers in elected office and their policies aren’t helping. Colorado, the report noted, led the nation in its rates of increased property crimes and, separately, auto thefts in 2020. Meanwhile the violent crime rate spiked 35% over the figure from 2011, whil nationally, the increase was just 3%.”
Colorado Politics: January 7, 2022 by Marianne Goodland
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Common Sense Institute Holds Inaugural free enterprise summit
“Kristin Strohm, president and CEO of CSI, told the audience that, as the state continues to recover from the impact of the health pandemic, the key to economic expansion is a free enterprise system ‘where individuals looking to provide for their families as well as businesses striving to meet the needs of their community, together, and free from intrusive oversight, lead to fuller bellies, bigger paychecks, and greater economic prosperity. The free enterprise system has proven to be the greatest economic engine in history and has lifted billions of people out of extreme poverty.””
The Villager: January 6, 2022 by John Frank by Freda Miklin
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Colorado Bankers Association’s first female CEO takes the helm a year early
“The Colorado Bankers Association named Jenifer Waller as CEO and president of the organization effective Jan. 1, concluding a two-year transition of its executive leadership…In addition to her work with Colorado Bankers Association (CBA), Waller participates in civic and educational programs. She is a board member for Colorado Civil Justice League, Compliance Alliance and Common Sense Institute.”
Denver Business Journal: January 5, 2022 by Jensen Werley
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Denver business leaders wary as Colorado lawmakers return to Capitol
“And the sentiment is being echoed by other business leaders affiliated with the Common Sense Institute, which held a summit last month to look at obstacles to free enterprise in Colorado.”
Axios Denver: January 3, 2022 by John Frank
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Opinion: Crime is up, and Democratic lawmakers aren’t helping
“The results of these record high numbers are damaging to communities, individuals, businesses and the state economy. Chris Brown, the vice president of research and policy at The Common Sense Institute, who collected data on arrests and court records, said ‘rising crime has a high price tag, the research shows: $27 billion in total, an amount equal to 77% of the state budget, which works out to an average cost of $4,762 a year for every Coloradan.'”
The Colorado Sun: January 2, 2022 by Mary Bradfield
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Colorado’s 3 big issues in 2022: Public safety, affordability, education
“Colorado is in the midst of a crime tsunami. According to a recent study by the Common Sense Institute, crime is 28% higher than it was in 2011. Property crime rates and auto thefts are among the highest in the entire country. And violent crime is at a 25-year high.”
The Durango Herald: January 2, 2022 by Michael Fields
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2021

Colorado health care policy experts brace for another Covid-19-focused year at Capitol
“The Common Sense Institute said that they’ll be monitoring how state and federal legislation approaches address cost. ‘Federal policy changes regarding price transparency, initiated under President Trump and continued under the Biden administration, have potential to resolve a huge problem in the healthy functioning of the market not just in Colorado, but across the country,’ said Chris Brown, Common Sense Institute Vice President of Policy & Research. ‘The public option, on the other hand, could have significant impacts on the small group market, and it will remain to be seen if there are any spillover impacts, in the form of higher prices, onto the commercial payer plans.'”
Denver Business Journal: December 29, 2021 by Jensen Werley
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THE EYES HAVE IT – Colorado’s “Crime Tsunami”
“Their [Common Sense Institute’s] research calculates the crime cost for Colorado at $27 billion last year. Former 18th Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler describes it, ‘We are awash in a crime tsunami.’… As George Brauchler, one of the study authors noted, ‘The Legislature has focused on being offender-friendly vs. victim-friendly.’ That may be the take home message regarding this disturbing Denver crime trend.”
The Villager: December 29, 2021 by Brian C. Joondeph
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Kafer: Like Aurora’s pole cat, 2021 has left us stranded without a ladder
“This year, crime all over the state rose 10% from the year before. Crime rates are 28% higher than they were a decade ago according to a new study by the Common Sense Institute. Theft, assault, rape and murder rates have all increased while the state correctional population has actually decreased. Less incarceration, more crime, there’s got to be a connection there somewhere.”
The Denver Post: December 27, 2021 by Krista Kafer
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The big three issues for the new year
“Colorado is in the midst of a crime tsunami. According to a recent study by the Common Sense Institute, crime is 28% higher than it was in 2011. Property crime rates and auto thefts are among the highest in the entire country. And violent crime is at a 25-year high. Before this study came out, nobody knew exactly how bad it was. That’s because we don’t have a statewide data dashboard. How can these problems be fixed if policymakers and the public don’t even have access to the data?”
The Daily Sentinel: December 26, 2021 by Michael Fields
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EDITORIAL: Colorado’s DAs must protect the public
“The tsunami is stigmatizing us nationwide: Colorado’s bears the dubious distinction of ranking first among all states for auto theft. Meanwhile incarceration in our state has plummeted over the past decade even as crime has soared – as documented recently in a new study by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute. The correlation is clear: Fewer lawbreakers in jail has meant more havoc on our streets.”
The Gazette: December 23, 2021 by The Gazette editorial board
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Putting lived experience at forefront, Feet Forward impacts homelessness in Boulder
“A study conducted by the Common Sense Institute identified Feet Forward as a recommended practice in-trust building. ‘The model helps build trust quickly and speeds up the path to engagement and furthers the continuity by transitioning these individuals out of homelessness with a built-in network of support,’ according to the study.”
Daily Camera: December 23, 2021 by Deborah Swearingen
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Report: Denver’s average rent increased 17% year-over-year
“According to research by the Common Sense Institute, a free enterprise think tank in Colorado, inflation has caused housing costs in the Denver metro area to increase by 3.8% so far in 2021 compared to the 2.8% increase the metro area saw in 2019.”
The Center Square: December 21, 2021 by Robert Davis
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A DIFFERENT POINT OF VIEW: Common Sense and Criminal Justice
“The op-ed by Quentin Young that appeared in the Daily Post on December 20 – criticizing the Common Sense Institute ‘Colorado Crime Wave’ report – is an example of political rhetoric posing as scholarship. That is evident from the following excerpt from the column: [T]he ‘Crime Wave’ report is a cascade of suspect conclusions and conspicuous omissions. The author of the column fails to demonstrate any ‘suspect conclusions’ or ‘conspicuous omissions’, other than that they disagree with a political agenda. The author provides no evidence whatsoever that any of the conclusions in the ‘Report’ are wrong.”
Pagosa Daily Post: December 21, 2021 by Gary Beatty
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OPINION | A Dubious Crime Wave Report
“Released by the Greenwood Village-based Common Sense Institute, and co-authored by former Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey, a Democrat, the report details rising rates of crime in Colorado over the last decade, calculates the monetary cost of that crime, and insinuates that what caused it are progressive policies that ‘discourage the jailing of those arrested for committing crimes’ and ‘reduce the severity of punishment for those convicted.’” 
Pagosa Daily Post: December 20, 2021 by Post Contributor
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PERSPECTIVE: Flawed policies cause a crippling crime wave
“Initially, we sought to understand the breadth and depth of the issue. Earlier this summer, we joined forces with Common Sense Institute, a highly respected, non-partisan research organization dedicated to the protection and promotion of Colorado’s economy. Together with CSI, we performed an exhaustive search of available data to identify the facts and separate them from the hype.” 
The Gazette: December 19, 2021 by George Brauchler and Mitch Morrissey
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HUDSON | Discerning when to listen to think tanks
“Following a decade of labor on the center right, Colorado’s Common Sense Institute (CSI) is making a bid to assume the position the Heritage Foundation has won for itself in Washington. You may not agree with Heritage’s positions, but it can be relied on to get its statistics right.” 
Colorado Politics: December 19, 2021 by Miller Hudson
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Insights | Crime, justice and cost are mounted on victims
“The Common Sense Institute released a grim report on Dec. 9 about Colorado’s state of public safety and the astronomical costs it inflicts. We lead the nation in the rate of increase in property crimes over the last decade, with Democrats in the governor’s office, while violent crime has risen 35%, though the increase nationally was just 3%… Morrissey didn’t agree, to a small extent, when I asked him about that. He said the one-size-fits-all approach takes the decisions out of the hands of prosecutors and judges, which results in criminals getting the opportunity to do more crime.” 
The Gazette: December 19, 2021 by Joey Bunch
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What’s Working: Colorado Springs is the only metro area that has recovered all jobs lost in the pandemic
“‘All four of those states were in the top 10 in terms of lowest percent of jobs lost in April 2020. Colorado ranked 24th.’ Brown said. ‘So the fact that they now have employment levels above January 2020 is a combination of stronger job growth since the worst of the jobs losses, along with the fact that they didn’t have as large of a deficit to dig out of.’” 
The Colorado Sun: December 18, 2021 by Tamara Chuang
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SLOAN | The cost of the crime problem
“The Common Sense Institute recently released a study that adds to this mountain of data, offering an analysis from the angel of economic impacts. The study’s principal authors, George Brauchler and Mitch Morrissey, are particularly well-suited to comment on criminal matters, having dedicated their professional lives to quarterbacking society’s response to them as district attorneys. The partnership with CSI’s resources has resulted in a paper that is as edifying as it is bleak.” 
The Gazette: December 17, 2021 by Kelly Sloan
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Colorado hiring stays strong in November, despite a slow start to ski season
“Accounting for population growth, the state will need to average 8,923 jobs per month through December 2022 in order to get back to a pre-pandemic employment-to-population ratio, said Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research at the Common Sense Institute, in an analysis of the state report.” 
Greeley Tribune: December 17, 2021 by Aldo Svaldi
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FOR COPO PRINT!!! COLORADO EDITORIALS
“The hard data is in; it’s alarming and grim. The price Colorado has paid for going soft on crime is startling, as a Gazette banner headline on Thursday made clear. It’s all in a landmark study released this week by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute… Alongside its human toll, Colorado’s crime wave – really, a tsunami – took a tremendous toll in dollars and cents. The Common Sense Institute’s research pegs it at $27 billion in both tangible and intangible costs for 2020. It averages to $4,762 a year per Colorado – or 77% of the state’s annual budget.” 
The Gazette: December 17, 2021 by Denver Gazette editorial board
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Two reports paint declining picture of Colorado’s economic competitiveness
“And the Common Sense Institute, in producing its first Free Enterprise Report, graded six of eight policy areas in the state as a three of four on a scale of five, giving marks of 4 to Colorado’s health care infrastructure, jobs/economic progress and taxing/fees structure… ‘I don’t have a solution for you,’ Brown said when asked what policy changes could make the biggest impact. ‘But I think the overall theme we see is that the state’s not enabling the free-enterprise system but rather trying to control it more and having these disproportionate effects across the state.’” 
Denver Business Journal: December 16, 2021 by Ed Sealover
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Former Denver DA Mitch Morrissey “Colorado Crime Wave”
“‘Some of the things that we found are startling. The increase in property crime, the increase in violent crime, Colorado being number one for instance in auto theft in the nation, [Colorado being] number one in the last ten years in property crime in the nation. I think this report really is a wake up call to the citizens of Colorado that they need to touch base with the policymakers in this state to see exactly what we can do to get a handle on this crime rate.’ Morrissey said.

‘No matter where you live. This is costing the citizens of Colorado an extra $5,000 a year. It doesn’t matter if you’re in a completely safe area or not…We are talking about over  $27 billion last year, is what it cost the state of Colorado last year. And that’s both tangible and intangible costs.'” 
KOA 850 AM & 94.1 FM: December 16, 2021 by Ross Kaminsky
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Prices in Denver up 6.4% through November
“Prices in Colorado’s largest metro area are up 6.4% so far this year, according to an analysis of Consumer Price Index data. That’s slightly lower than the 6.8% average price increase on all items nationally, according to the Common Sense Institute’s (CSI) analysis, which said that a ‘resurgence of growth’ between September and November suggest that inflation could persist longer than expected.” 
Kiowa County Press: December 16, 2021 by Robert Davis, The Center Square contributor
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INSIGHTS: Ganahl pins fentanyl surge on Polis’ policies
“Ganahl, like Republicans nationally, is teeing up concerns about rising crime. Colorado Politics told you about a report showing scary increases released last week by the Denver-based Common Sense Institute, where Ganahl is a former board member.” 
Colorado Politics: December 16, 2021 by Joey Bunch
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A splash of truth about Colorado’s ‘crime wave’
“Released by the Greenwood Village-based Common Sense Institute, and co-authored by former Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey, a Democrat, the report details rising rates of crime in Colorado over the last decade, calculates the monetary cost of that crime, and insinuates that what cause it are progressive policies that ‘discourage the jailing of those arrested for committing crimes’ and ‘reduce the severity of punishment for those convicted.’” 
Colorado Newsline: December 16, 2021 by Quentin Young
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Common Sense Institute Analyzes the State Budget Over Time
“It has become an annual tradition for the Common Sense Institute to analyze the way our state government allocates its resources from year to year. These charts show that, over the past 14 years, the total operating appropriations for all state departments have increased by 110% while the amount allocated to Health Care Policy and Financing (HCPF) has gone up 267%. In FY2008, HCPF absorbed 21% of the state’s resources. By FY2022, that share had shot up to 36%.” 
The Villager: December 15, 2021 by Freda Miklin
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The Steffan Tubbs Show
“‘The total cost of crime in Colorado exceeded $27 billion in 2020. While costs are disproportionately felt by victims, this implies an average cost per Coloradan of $4,762 per year. The 2021 costs will grow as the violent crime rate is on pace to be the highest since 1994, a 10% annual increase.’ said the report.” 
710 KNUS (The Steffan Tubbs Show): December 15, 2021 by Steffan Tubbs
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Denver Gazette: Lock ’em up, curb Colorado crime
“You’d think it would go without saying. Yet, as the Common Sense Institute’s blockbuster study, released last week, points out, Colorado’s policymakers have been ignoring that straightforward logic for years. We are all now reaping what they have sown.” 
Colorado Politics: December 14, 2021 by Denver Gazette editorial board
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Car theft in Denver – and across Colorado – is among worst in U.S.
“Of note: The findings are bolstered by a new report from the Common Sense Institute that found Colorado had the highest auto theft rate of all states, and that only the city of Washington, D.C. was higher.” 
Axios Denver: December 14, 2021 by Alayna Alvarez
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Brauchler: How crime got so bad in Colorado
“A brand-new report on crime and its costs, which I co-authored through the Common Sense Institute gives a comprehensive answer to the size of the crime wave, some of its origins, and its measurable costs. The numbers are historic and staggering. The Broncos only wish they could have put up the numbers criminals have in Colorado… These policies have failed. That failure comes with a hefty price tag. The total cost of crime in Colorado, including tangible and intangible costs, exceeds $27 billion.” 
Journal Advocate: December 13, 2021 by George Brauchler
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RISING CRIME RATES: Former Colorado DA On ‘Restorative Justice’ Driving Crime
“To give some more perspective to this study, this was not just a republican district attorney for the largest part of Colorado, my partner [Mitch Morrissey] was a democrat district attorney for Denver who had been in charge for twelve years…The biggest surprise to me was how much Colorado leads in all the categories you don’t want to be a leader in.” 
The Dana Show: December 13, 2021 by Dana Loesch
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Increase in Colorado’s property crime rate bucks national trend, report says
“From 2010 to 2020, Colorado’s property crime rate increased more than that of almost any other state, and its motor vehicle theft rate more than doubled. That’s according to a new report from the Common Sense Institute, a nonprofit, nonpartisan, conservative-leaning think tank based in Greenwood Village… ‘The amount of money that’s involved in terms of the cost to Colorado is breathtaking in terms of the annual amount,’ Brauchler said. The report estimated tangible costs associated with crime in 2020 at $8.5 billion.” 
The Durango Herald Regional News: December 13, 2021 by Faith Miller
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Increase In Colorado’s Property Crime Rate Bucks National Trend, Report Says
“The report, released Thursday, sought to quantify the so-called ‘crime wave’ in Colorado. Its lead authors were George Brauchler, a Republican who until this year served as the district attorney for Colorado’s 18th Judicial District, and Mitch Morrissey, a Democrat who formerly served as Denver district attorney. Both are currently criminal justice fellows with Common Sense Institute.

‘During the first year of the pandemic, the difference was exacerbated. Nationally, the property crime rate fell by another 8%,’ the report says. ‘Colorado went the opposite direction, increasing by 8%.'” 
Patch: December 12, 2021 by Faith Miller, Colorado Newsline
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Report: Crime has $27B price tag for Coloradans last year
“An economic analysis of crime in Colorado found it cost the state approximately $27 billion last year. The report, compiled by the free enterprise think tank Common Sense Institute (CSI), compared crime data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Colorado Crime Statistics, a database that is funded by the Colorado Auto Theft Prevention Authority.” 
Washington Examiner: December 10, 2021 by Robert Davis, The Center Square
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‘Crime Tsunami’: New Study By Two Former District Attorneys Finds Colorado’s Crime Rate Worse Than Other States
“A new study finds violent crimes and property crimes are rising faster in Colorado than nationally. Common Sense Institute, a non-partisan research organization, says violent crime jumped 10% in the state last year, compared to 5% nationally, and property crime increased 8%, while it dropped 8% nationally… ‘We are awash in a crime tsunami’, says former 18th Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler. He and former Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey conducted the study found that crime has been on the rise in Colorado for the last 10 years.” 
CBS4 Denver: December 10, 2021 by CBS4 Political Specialist Shaun Boyd
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No, Legal Firearm Ownership Isn’t To Blame For Increased Homicides in American Cities
“New data from Colorado highlights how this is ultimately playing out in every state. The Common Sense Institute studied the crime rate in Colorado and crime rates across the country and compared…CSI argues that ‘trends in these outcomes across the criminal justice system reflect how one-sided policy changes over the years have altered the system’ and ‘as a result of multiple reforms, the trends across bond practices, parole rates, and incarceration levels, all point to a system tipping further away from accountability.’” 
Dana Loesch’s Chapter and Verse: December 9, 2021 by Dana Loesch
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Report: Crime has $27B price tag for Coloradans last year
“The think tank [Common Sense Institute] said two issues are contributing to the state’s crime increase: the policy trend toward de-carceration of criminals and reduced severity of punishments…. The report’s authors said they hope the analysis will inspire ‘practical solutions to what is, in part, an economic issue.’” 
The Center Square contributor: December 9, 2021 by Robert Davis
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Former district attorneys link soft crime policies, high Colorado crime rates, in new report
“The Common Sense Institute released a study Thursday on crime in Colorado and its potential causes. Former district attorneys George Brauchler and Mitch Morrisey co-authored the study. The former prosecutors said the problem is with the state’s current judges and district attorneys who have kept risky offenders out of jail. Both are urging lawmakers to act. The report says the crimes are costing taxpayers an estimated $27 billion.

‘The judicial branch could [take action] if they were motivated to do so, but why would they want to create metrics that hold their feet to the fire and show some of the results of their poor decision-making?’ Brauchler said. ‘I agree with Mitch, this is driven by the legislature and the governor. They’re the ones that control the laws in this state that govern things like transparency and reporting. They could do it and they do it in the next session.'”
Denver (KDVR): December 9, 2021 by DJ Summers, Gabrielle Franklin
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Report: Crime has $27B price tag for Coloradans last year
“The report, compiled by the free enterprise think tank Common Sense Institute (CSI), compared crime data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Colorado Crime Stats, a database that is funded by the Colorado Auto Theft Prevention Authority. ‘Given the concerning trends and high costs, it is imperative that policymakers implement timely, transparent, and actionable accountability metrics, that allow them to diagnose specific system level problems and individual policy decisions across the multiple dimensions of criminal justice in Colorado,’ the report said.” 
Grand Junction Daily Sentinel: December 9, 2021 by Robert Davis
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Editorial: Blame ‘justice reform’ for our crime WAVE
“The price Colorado has paid going soft on crime is startling, as a Gazette banner headline on Thursday made clear. It’s all in a landmark study released this week by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute, which reveals: Violent crime in our state skyrocketed 35% from 2011 to last year – while rising only 3% nationwide. The state’s crime rate for 2021 is on track to be highest since 1994. Colorado’s 2020v murder rate was 106% higher than in 2011. Assault was up 40% in that same time. Rape was 9% higher.
The Denver Gazette: December 10, 2021
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New report links Colorado’s rising crime to criminal-friendly public policy
“The Common Sense Institute, the economy-oriented Denver think tank, collected sometimes hard-to-obtain data, according to the authors, on arrests and court records. The pair worked with Chris Brown, the vice president of research and policy at the institute, who normally crunches data on taxing and spending… ‘ There is a cost to this that is damaging to communities, that is damaging individuals, for businesses in the future for our state economy mainly. And so absolutely this is a business issue,’ Brown said in a Zoom call with Morrissey and Colorado Politics on Wednesday.”
Colorado Politics: December 9, 2021 by Joey Bunch
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2021 Violent Crime rate on pace to be highest since 1994 in Colorado, according to new report
“Across Colorado, crime overall is on the rise, and it’s not just because of the pandemic. Thursday the Common Sense Institute (CSI) released information on how the state as a whole was doing when it came to crime rates. Former DA for the 18th Judicial District, George Brauchler and Former DA for the 2nd Judicial District, Mitch Morrissey presented the data during a press conference.

‘Violent crime is at 30% over the last decade which is very disturbing to somebody like me who is a prosecutor since the early 80’s,’ said Morrissey. ‘Colorado is number one auto theft in the country. It’s the number one place in crime rate for auto theft. Also over that period of time that we looked at property crimes, we are number one in property crimes in Colorado.'”
Colorado Springs KKTV: December 9, 2021 by Nicole Heins
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Mitch Morrissey Criminal Justice Fellow at Common Sense Institute
“‘We looked at trends that usually went back ten year periods. And we did that to make sure that we weren’t just look at trends during this [pandemic] strange time. Colorado crime costs citizens an awful lot amount of money, it’s over $27 billion in 2020. So of the most disturbing things when you look at that period of time, increases in auto theft, increases in property crime and one of the most concerning things we found was the increase in violent crime.’ said Mitch Morrissey.
KOA 850 AM & 94.1 FM: December 9, 2021 by April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz
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Inflation & ‘Quit Rates’ Causing Concerns as Colorado Economy Is Slowly Rebounding
“‘Colorado is still a little over two percent down in terms of employment levels relative to pre-pandemic and so we still have a long way to go,’ said Chris Brown, Vice President of Policy and Research for the Common Sense Institute. ‘What has been incredible over just the last couple months has been seeing the sort of continued and lingering aftershocks of the economic shutdown and hardship we saw in 2020, and that is resonated in the labor market, and Colorado has faced very high levels of separation particularly people quitting their jobs now,’ Brown said.”
CBS Denver: December 6, 2021, by Jamie Leary
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Report maps Colorado’s budgetary changes over two decades
“A new report by the Common Sense Institute shows how Colorado’s budgetary spending has changed over the past two decades. The free enterprise think tank’s report analyzed the annual appropriations reports compiled by staff of the Colorado Joint Budget Committee, a bipartisan group state lawmakers who write the state’s budget… CSI said its methodology was designed to ‘reflect the shifting priorities brought on as a direct result of the laws and budgets passed each legislative session.’
The Center Square Colorado: December 3, 2021, by Robert Davis
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What’s Working: Colorado was tied for nation’s 4th highest rate of job quitters in September
“But for the number of job openings or hiring to decline seems puzzling, especially as Colorado saw even higher quit rates in September than in August, said Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research at Common Sense Institute, a think tank on economic research and policy in Greenwood Village.

‘It could just be inconsistency in reporting, or given new business formation is up, these new companies are not yet captured in the JOLTS survey,’ Brown said. ‘It makes sense that both the employment survey and this JOLTS survey won’t align 100%, however they don’t seem to be pointing in the same overall direction.'”
The Colorado Sun: November 27, 2021, by Tamara Chuang
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Despite Boulder’s vocal support for Indigenous people, data and residents tell a different story
“Boulder has a night shelter, Boulder Shelter for the Homeless, but Indigo doesn’t stay there. When he returned to Boulder last year after a decades-long absence, he tried to access the shelter, but says he was told to leave the city because he hadn’t lived here for six months — a process called diversion that still disproportionately funnels homeless people of color out of the city, per data provided by Firnhaber. These sorts of barriers, say researchers from Common Sense Institute’s Homelessness Ecosystem Analysis team, reduce the likelihood that someone will use services in the future.
Boulder Weekly: November 24, 2021, by Sam Becker and Nick LaBerge
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Colorado added 10,600 jobs in October; Unemployment fell to 5.4%
“Colorado’s total employment levels are approximately 2.2% below its pre-pandemic employment levels. At this pace, Colorado needs to add 9,529 jobs each month to reach its pre-pandemic levels by May 2022, according to an analysis of CDLE’s data by the Common Sense Institute (CSI), a free-enterprise think tank.
The Center Square Colorado: November 22, 2021, by Robert Davis
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What’s Working: Colorado’s job recovery rate is the nation’s 10th fastest. So why is our jobless rate the 15th highest?
“‘Colorado’s job market is still recuperating, so it’s not that surprising that a high labor force participation rate is fueled by high unemployment rights now,’ said Erik Gamm, a research analyst with Common Sense Institute, an economic research organization established to promote Colorado’s economy. ‘It would be more worrisome if the unemployment rate was low and the participation rate was as well, because that would imply that people aren’t seeking jobs and portend a very slow recovery.’
The Colorado Sun: November 20, 2021, by Tamara Chuang
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Colorado unemployment falls, job creation reaches highest levels since July
“At the current pace of recovery, Colorado is likely to achieve pre-pandemic employment numbers by May, estimated the Common Sense Institute, a business-focused think tank. So far, just two states, Idaho and Utah, have reported that they have a larger number of people working in them now than they did in February 2020.
Denver Business Journal: November 19, 2021, by Ed Sealover
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Colorado’s tax system could be headed for a major shakeup
“Tax policy panel member Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research at the business-focused Common Sense Institute, estimated in September that the difference between FTI and AGI in Colorado is $47.8 billion – a total that would produce around $2.1 billion in extra tax revenue under the state’s 4.55% income tax. While the impact on individuals and businesses would vary greatly, Brown suggested that some taxpayers would see their bills rise by as much as a third – a boost that is large enough for the task force to question what they would be looking to get out of such a move.
Denver Business Journal: November 12, 2021, by Ed Sealover
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Pinnacle Award Winner Robin Wise brings financial literacy to the masses
“You were recognized as a Denver-area power player in our pages in 2021 – a time many see as the beginning of Denver’s current period of rapid growth and change. What’s surprised you most over the past decade, and what do you find most encouraging in that change? ‘This region seems to have some of the largest charitable events and unique nonprofit programs in the country – Colorado Gives Day, the one-of-a-kind Young Americans Bank, the exceptional Common Sense Institute. That speaks to not only the spirit of the West, but the kind of people who live here who want to support vision that benefits the community.’
Denver Business Journal: November 12, 2021, by Jonathan Rose
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Murrey: Governor Polis crippled small business, now offers crutches
“A large portion of the proposed ‘fee relief’ is intended to reduce payroll taxes. But Colorado had no state-level payroll taxes a year ago. We do now, thanks to a Democrat-backed ballot measure that the nonpartisan Common Sense Institute estimates will cost employers over $1.3 billion dollars per year by 2025.
Complete Colorado – Page Two: November 12, 2021, by Ben Murrey
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Denver courts administering high number of personal recognizance bonds 
“‘It’s time we look at the system because this system is failing,’ said former Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey, who served in the post from 2005-2017. ‘There are way too many of these [PR bonds], and that’s causing Denver to not be the safe place that is should be.'”

George Brauchler, a former District Attorney for the 18th Judicial District that spans mainly Arapahoe and Douglas counties, said the data was shocking. Brauchler left office earlier this year. ‘It’s reckless,’ Brauchler said, ‘I don’t understand it. The numbers you are talking about are significant.'”
Denver7: November 10, 2021, by Tony Kovaleski
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EDITORIAL: ‘Denver’s Road Home’ is still a dead end
“A groundbreaking report Colorado’s Common Sense Institute released in August concluded that nearly half a billion – billion – dollars a year is spent on the homeless in combined public and private funding in metro Denver area. As the institute’s repor.t noted, that’s $41,613 to $104,038 per homeless person in Denver based on homeless population estimates that have ranged anywhere from around 4,000 to over 10,000.”
The Denver Gazette: November 10, 2021, by Gazette editorial board
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Colorado’s topsy-turvy job market, explained
“What’s happening: The state led the nation for layoffs and separations in August and ranked NO. 7 for people quitting jobs, well above the national average, according to a newly released federal report that breaks down the state’s labor data for the first time….’This new data series at the state level continues to add evidence that the labor market is highly volatile in the midst of recovery,’ said Chris Brown, an economist at the Common Sense Institute.
AXIOS Denver: November 9, 2021, by John Frank
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5 Cannabis Storylines of 2021 General Election
“Colorado voters rejected an attempt to raise taxes on adult-use cannabis sales with a 54.5% majority saying ‘no” to Proposition 119, which called for a 5% increase by 2024 on the state’s 15% sales tax at retail, according to results from the Colorado Secretary of State website.

The increase sought to raise $137.6 million a year for out-of-school education programs, with a priority on children from low-income households. About $20 million a year would also go toward the enrichment programs from the Colorado Land Board Trust, according to a Common Sense Institute report, though that number could fluctuate depending on state land revenue, according to The Denver Post.”
Cannabis Business Times: November 3, 2021, by Tony Lange
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Colorado voters nix raising and lowering taxes, as well as limiting tax-spending power
“The after-school plan also would have gotten about $22 million from the state land board that normally would go to the Public Education Permanent Fund, investments that ultimately benefit K-12 education. ‘The principle and interest that otherwise would be invested in the fund represents a $40 million loss over a decade but in 20 years will be three times that,’ said Chris Brown, an analyst for the Common Sense Institute in Denver.
The Denver Gazette: November 2, 2021, by Joey Bunch
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Gov. Jared Polis proposes $1.3 billion more in next year’s budget to address effects of pandemic
“The business-minded Common Sense Institute issued a report this year citing some addressed by the spending ideas the governor presented. ‘It is encouraging to see the governor’s proposed budget at least partially addresses three of the four large fiscal challenges we identified in our April report,’ Chris Brown, the institute’s vice president of policy and research, said Monday. ‘Committing $600 million to partially pay off the loans to the federal unemployment insurance trust fund will go a long way in reducing the payroll tax increases for years to come.’
Colorado Politics: November 1, 2021, by Marianne Goodland
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Seeing the problem: Homelessness in the Denver metro
“The Common Sense Institute, a business-focused organization, partnered with the University of Colorado Denver’s Inworks program, the Downtown Denver Partnership and Together Denver to pin down spending and outcomes. The report’s estimates group the spending from Denver Health, Denver Police Department, Denver Fire Department, Denver’s Homelessness Resolution Fund and charitable organizations.

The City and County of Denver disputes the Common Sense Institute’s findings, however, saying the study double counts what the city grants to non-profits and what the non-profits spend, among other issues.”
Denver (KDVR): November 1, 2021, by DJ Summers, Lori Jane Gliha, Rob Low
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Homelessness: How can metro Denver grapple with problem?
“The report includes several other ideas that researchers at the Common Sense Institute and University of Colorado Denver identified as successful in other communities and help promise for us locally. ‘There are a variety of programs doing impactful work in meeting the different needs of people experiencing homelessness,’ said Kristin Strohm, CEO and president of the Common Sense Institute, a research organization dedicated to protecting and promoting Colorado’s economy, which partnered with CU Denver to produce the report.
The Colorado Sun: October 31, 2021, by Tatiana Flowers
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PERSPECTIVE: Vote Yes on Prop 120, defend the rights of all Coloradans
“On the nonresidential side, the assessment rate has been fixed at 29% for 40 years. This means Colorado’s commercial property rate is almost twice as high as Utah’s and three times as high as Wyoming’s, according to a study by the Common Sense Institute.
The Denver Gazette: October 31, 2021, by Michael Fields
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Colorado had the nation’s highest rate of layoffs and job separations in August
“‘People are intentionally moving jobs because they’re seeking a different role, better pay. I would usually interpret that as very positive,’ Brown said. ‘But what I think is most interesting is that while there’s a lot of churn and activity in the labor market, the overall job growth levels at least over the last two months are slowing.’
The Colorado Sun: October 28, 2021, by Tamara Chuang
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Homelessness in metro Denver isn’t waning. But research from CU Denver and a private think tank offers ideas to help.
“Common Sense Institute and CU Denver researchers looked at programs working in the seven-county metro region in hopes of exporting the concepts to other communities…. A major recommendation by the researchers studying homelessness in Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Denver, Douglas and Jefferson counties is adding more affordable housing options.

‘There are a variety of programs doing impactful work in meeting the different needs of people experiencing homelessness,’ said Kristin Strohm, CEO and president of the Common Sense Institute, a research organization dedicated to protecting and promoting Colorado’s economy, which partnered with CU Denver to produce the report.

The researchers are also urging community leaders to find additional ways to support providers, who are short-staffed, yet offer critical support to people who are homeless or at risk for homelessness. Amplifying awareness of providers and their work can help achieve that goal. Encouraging formerly homeless people to become entrepreneurs, who offer peer services in the system, can also help address the crisis, study leaders said.”
The Colorado Sun: October 27, 2021, by Tatiana Flowers
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Denver voters will weigh whether to lower and cap sales taxes
“By the numbers: The city estimates the lower rate will lead to a $49 million reduction in tax revenue for the 2022 fiscal year, impacting discretionary services and dedicated programs already approved by voters, such as preschool, college affordability, mental health and parks. A separate analysis by the conservative Common Sense Institute puts the fiscal impact at $69 million, or a 6.4% cut in annual spending.
AXIOS Denver: October 26, 2021, by John Frank
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Denver metro has 85 organizations serving the homelessness, think tank analysis finds
“The Denver metro area has at least 85 organizations that help serve people experiencing or exiting homelessness, an analysis from the Common Sense Institute (CSI) found. The analysis, released on Monday, marks the second phase of the free market think tank’s deep-dive into the systemic factors that impact homelessness in metro Denver.

Phase two ‘seeks to understand, and visualize, the ecosystem of factors that contribute to furthering homelessness as well as those factors that contribute to the prevention of homelessness or supporting those experiencing homelessness to move into stable housing,’ according to the analysis.

‘There are a variety of programs doing impactful work in meeting the different needs of people experiencing homelessness,’ CSI CEO Kristin Strohm said in a statement. ‘Our goal with this phase was to document what’s working, where there are opportunities, where there might be gaps, and ultimately learn from them to solve this crisis.'”
The Center Square: October 25, 2021, by Robert Davis
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Common Sense Institute takes second bite at homelessness issue
“The solutions need to be as varied as the problems that cause homelessness in the seven-county Denver metro area, according to the second phase of a Common Sense Institute analysis released Monday morning.

‘There are a variety of programs doing impactful work in meeting the different needs of people experiencing homelessness,’ stated Kristin Strohm, the institute’s CEO and president. ‘Our goal with this phase was to document what’s working, where there are opportunities, where there might be gaps, an ultimately learn from them to solve this crisis.'”
Colorado Politics: October 25, 2021, by Joey Bunch
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Common Sense Institute takes second bite at homelessness issue
“The solutions need to be as varied as the problems that cause homelessness in the seven-county Denver metro area, according to the second phase of a Common Sense Institute analysis released Monday morning.

The Denver-based business think tank released the back half of a report titled ‘The Economic Footprint of Homelessness in Metro Denver,’ a follow up to an August release that looked at how taxpayers’ money is spent on the issue that has eluded the city for years.

On a conference call with reporters Monday morning, the paper’s authors said more research is needed, as well as more collaboration between the organizations involved and leadership to find solutions on housing accessibility and affordability, rather than doing more of the same.

‘There are a variety of programs doing impactful work in meeting the different needs of people experiencing homelessness,’ stated Kristin Strohm, the institute’s CEO and president. ‘Our goal with this phase was to document what’s working, where there are opportunities, where there might be gaps, and ultimately learn from them to solve this crisis.'”
The Denver Gazette: October 25, 2021, by Joey Bunch
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POINT | Coloradans need property tax relief
“Proposition 120 would not only cut residential property taxes, but also commercial property taxes. According to the Common Sense Institute, Colorado’s effective commercial property rate is almost twice as high as our neighboring state of Utah – and three times as high as Wyoming.”
Colorado Politics: October 24, 2021, by Bob Beauprez
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Colorado unemployment rate drops to 5.6% in September, gains lag
“If the state economy keeps adding jobs around last month’s pace, Colorado won’t reach pre-pandemic employment counts until January 2023, said Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research at the Common Sense Institute, in a research note Thursday.”
Journal-Advocate, The Denver Post: October 23, 2021, by Aldo Svaldi
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Colorado unemployment drops to lowest since start pandemic, but labor force dropping too
“While the overall labor force is dropping, however, the number of mothers actively working or seeking work returned for the first time in September to pre-pandemic levels, according to the Common Sense Institute, a business-focused research organization. Their labor force participation rate rose last month to 76.5%, according to the organization, leaving fathers as the primary group between the ages of 25 and 64 that are seeking or occupying jobs at a lower rate than they did in January 2020.

While the leisure and hospitality sectors have gained 41,800 jobs since September 2020, it remains down about 28,600 jobs from pre-pandemic levels, according to numbers supplied by CDLE and the Common Sense Institute”
Denver Business Journal: October 22, 2021, by Ed Sealover
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Colorado’s employment rate lacks what’s needed for a full recovery by 2023
“For the second straight month, job growth indicates pace of recovery in Colorado slowing, according to numbers and analysis released Friday by the Common Sense Institute, a Denver-based business think tank.

‘While September job levels are 48% lower than what is needed to see a full recovery by January 2023, there was an important milestone in the labor force data,’ Chris Brown, the institute’s vice president of policy and research, said in an email. ‘Throughout the pandemic, women, and mothers in particular, have left the labor force at higher rates.’

Brown noted, however, that Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers in September indicated the workforce participation rate for mothers surpassed pre-pandemic levels for the first time. ‘While the monthly data will remain volatile, this is an important signal that conditions are continuing to improve,’ Brown said.”
Colorado Politics: October 22, 2021, by Joey Bunch
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Colorado 2021 Election: Some Ballot Measures Create Controversy, Confusion 
“An analysis by Common Sense Institute found that the program could provide two and a half hours of tutoring a week for about 95,000 students if each one received the full $1,500. Students would choose from a list of providers certified by a new state board appointed by the governor.”
CBS Denver: October 18, 2021, by Shaun Boyd
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POINT | Prop 119 is a lifeline for our students 
“A recent study by the Common Sense Institute found that Prop 119 would provide financial aid to fund tutoring for 98,000 kids. The financial aid program would be administered by an independent board of education experts, not by politicians.”
Colorado Politics: October 17, 2021, by Bob Gardner
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Colorado 2021 Election: Some Ballot Measures Create Controversy, Confusion 
“The Common Sense Institute, in a report on 303, said the measure would result in higher costs to take care of Denver’s homeless population. The business-leaning think tank noted, however, that ballot measure Denver voters passed year, Initiative 2B, would likely cover new costs arising from expenses related to designated camping areas.

‘Denver voters passed Initiative 2B: Homelessness Resolution Fund in 2020, which increased the city sales tax by .25% to raise an estimated $40 million annually for homeless related priorities,’ the institute stated last month. ‘Initiative 2B funding creates more resources for those who are unhoused through combining housing and services, restoring lost shelter capacity, and improving health and services.’

The Common Sense Institute also took a look at 304, and said that a cut in sales tax would save the average household about 4120 per year. And the reductions in city revenue would still keep the tax rate 12.1% above what it was in 2019.”
Colorado Politics: October 17, 2021, by Colorado Politics staff
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What’s Working: People are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Here’s what happened in Colorado.
“The new JOLTS data – which also shared that the number of job openings, hires and layoffs were down in August – could mean workers are feeling more confident about employment, especially if they already have a job, said Chris Brown, with Common Sense Institute, an economic think tank in Greenwood Village.

‘Higher rate of quits in itself doesn’t necessarily indicate a problem, as workers may be seeking other jobs,’ Brown said, adding that August is typically a high quit rate month. ‘It seems like while there are normal seasonal factors driving a higher number of quits in August, the current pandemic-related labor force factors have pushed even more people to quit this August.'”
The Colorado Sun: October 16, 2021, by Tamara Chuang
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ENDORSEMENT: YES on Denver bonds – except 2B
“2B would spend an additional $38.6 million on housing and shelter projects, including acquiring a building the city already leases for use as a shelter. Yet, Colorado’s Common Sense Institute recently released a report tallying the total public and private dollars spent serving the homeless in the metro area, and it turned out to be just shy of a stunning half billion dollars a year. That’s $41,613 to $104,038 per homeless person in Denver based on homeless population numbering anywhere from around 4,000 to over 10,000.”
The Denver Gazette: October 15, 2021, by Editorial Board
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Bob Gardner: Colorado’s kids need educational resources – vote yes on Prop. 119 
“A recent study by the Common Sense Institute found that Prop 119 would provide financial aid to fund tutoring for 98,000 kids. The financial aid program would be administered by an independent board of education experts, not by politicians.”
Greeley Tribune Guest Columns: October 13, 2021, by Bob Gardner
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Election 2021: Prop 120 will drop property taxes – at least for some
“If the lawsuit is successful, it’s not clear if Proposition 120 would then reduce the assessment rates for all property and residential taxes in Colorado. However, that’s what the Common Sense Institute believes would happen.”
The Colorado Sun, Centennial Citizen: October 12, 2021, by Jesse Paul
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Yes or No Proposition 119 
“‘It is actually intentionally created to be an independent board that can be agile and responsive to the needs of parents and really just be a way to get money into parents hands’ says Brenda B. Dickhoner, the education fellow for Common Sense Institute and President of Ready Colorado. ‘Parents know their children best and they are able to direct these funds however they see fit for their child… There is a Common Sense Institute ballot guide on this issue that shows the potential reach of this upwards of 95,000 students at 150% of the poverty level could receive this funding. And I think that’s a huge number of students who have long be underserved by our current system’ said Dickhoner.”
KOA 850 AM & 94.1 FM: October 12, 2021, by Ross Kaminsky
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Denver election 2021: Voters will be asked whether to cap sales tax rate
“Flicker pointed to an analysis of Ordinance 304 by the Common Sense Institute (a politically unaffiliated but business-focused think tank) that found Denver’s sales tax rate has risen almost 23% since 2018 because of six voter-approved measures.

The analysis found that if the sales tax rate was cut from 4.81% to 4.5% next year, tax collections would fall by $69.2 million but city revenue in total would only fall by 0.5% and still be well above 2019 levels. The Common Sense Institute noted that individuals’ savings would vary based on spending habits, but estimated the average Denver household would save $120 a year if 304 passed.
The Denver Post: October 10, 2021, by Joe Rubino
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Support Prop 119 and close the achievement gap 
“A study by the Common Sense Institute says Prop. 119 would fund tutoring for 98,000 students. The financial aid dollars would be administered by an independent board of education experts, not by the Legislature.”
The Daily Sentinel: October 10, 2021, by Matt Soper
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Time to push back at smug school boards 
“Voters must always emphasize improving educational outcomes – especially in the wake of COVID lockdowns – and properly budgeting K-12 education. According to a new report from the Common Sense Institute, among the $13.22 billion in total revenue, only 35.6% of Colorado’s education spending goes to teacher salaries – a drop of 41% 10 years ago. Meanwhile, the share of administrative and support services skyrockets.”
The Gazette (Colo. Springs): October 8, 2021, by Jimmy Sengenberger
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Proposition 120 sparks a debate over property tax cuts. Here’s why it’s complicated by a recent bill 
“But Proposition 120 is more complex than it seems…’There might be the case of what voters see on their ballot and what they vote on is not the final outcome in terms of the impact of their tax bill’, said Chris Brown, who works at the Common Sense Institute in Greenwood Village. ‘Very intentionally, the state legislature this year passed Senate Bill 293, which intentionally changed and altered some of the property tax classifications.

‘If voters approve this, it will likely be the final impact will be determined in courts through different legal arguments’, Brown said.”
KUNC: October 6, 2021, by Scott Franz
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Other Voices: State spending plenty – but not wisely – on schools 
“Colorado’s public education system starts almost every year with all the resources you’d think it would need to achieve better outcomes for its students. Yet it never manages to arrive at that goal. A telling new report from Colorado’s Common Sense Institute underscores the point. The nonpartisan, nonprofit institute tracked public ed spending by the state over time; its research findings challenge conventional wisdom.

Among the report’s findings is that, ‘funding for K-12 education is at an all-time high, even as education continues to be crowded out of the state budget by spending on other areas such as health care…’ The Common Sense findings offer some compelling clues, if not definitive answers. It comes down at least in part, to how the money is being spent.

As the Common Sense report points out, ‘By 2022, the contributions to PERA from the school division just to pay down the unfunded liability will be more than $900 million… The more than $900 million in funds could be available for other spending priorities if it were not committed to pay down the growing unfunded liability…’ The 33-page report also zeros in on mission creep…’There has been a decrease in spending on staff and services related to instruction over the past 10 years… Operations, school and district administration and supports for students all saw increases as a share of total spending from 2010 to 2020.'”
Greeley Tribune Guest Editorial: October 6, 2021
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Denver City Council unanimously adopts resolutions opposing pair of Republican-backed initiatives 
“A recent study by the Common Sense Institute estimates that $434.6 million is spent annually on homelessness, which includes $217 million spent on charitable groups.”
The Colorado Center Square: October 5, 2021, by Robert Davis
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Editorial: Spending plenty, but not wisely, on schools
“Colorado’s public education system starts almost every year with all the resources you’d think it would need to achieve better outcomes for its students. Yet it never manages to arrive at that goal. A telling new report from Colorado’s Common Sense Institute underscores the point. The nonpartisan, nonprofit institute tracked public ed spending by the state over time; its research findings challenge conventional wisdom.

Put more succinctly, the input of funding doesn’t seem to match the output in student achievement. Why? The Common Sense findings offer some compelling clues, if not definitive answers. It comes down, at least in part, to how the money is being spent.

As the Common Sense report points out, ‘By 2022, the contributions to PERA from the school division just to pay down the unfunded liability will be more than $900 million… The more than $900 million in funds could be available for other spending priorities if it were not committed to pay down the growing unfunded liability…’ The 33-page report also zeros in on mission creep…’There has been a decrease in spending on staff and services related to instruction over the past 10 years… Operations, school and district administration and supports for students all saw increases as a share of total spending from 2010 to 2020.'”
The Gazette: October 5, 2021, by The Gazette Editorial Board
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Proposition 120: Voter will decide if Colorado property taxes will go down – at least for some
“If you want to know how big of a hit your county would take if Proposition 120 passes, check out the chart below that was created using data from the Common Sense Institute.”
The Colorado Sun: October 5, 2021, by Jesse Paul
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Proposition 119 asks voter to raise recreational marijuana taxes for out-of-school enrichment programs
“The measure calls for a 5 percentage point increase by 2024 on the state’s 15% sales tax for recreational marijuana by 2024 (starting with a 3% rate increase in 2022 and 4% in 2023). If passed, about $20 million a year would also go toward the enrichment programs from the Colorado Land Board Trust, according to a Common Sense Institute report, though that number would fluctuate depending on state land revenue.”
The Denver Post: October 4, 2021, by Saja Hindi
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Brenda on the George Brauchler Show, KNUS 
“Common Sense Institute fellow, Dr. Brenda Bautsch Dickhoner, PhD., joins Jimmy discuss CSI’s new report on Colorado’s K-12 education spending. Callers offer thoughts on what’s happening in public schools, and a listener challenges Jimmy over election integrity.”
Jimmy Sengenberger Show: October 2, 2021, by Jimmy Sengenberger
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