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Colorado’s Fentanyl Problem and the Economic Costs

Colorado’s Fentanyl Problem and the Economic Costs

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The total cost of fentanyl-related overdose deaths in Colorado is estimated to be $16 billion in 2023. This is over ten times the cost of fentanyl overdose from 2017, $1.3 billion. That $16 billion is 3% of the state’s GDP in 2023.

By the Numbers: Growth in Property Tax Revenue

By the Numbers: Growth in Property Tax Revenue

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Property tax revenue increased by $2.4 billion dollars in 2024. The annual increase of 19% was the largest since 1975. Since 2019, property tax revenue has increased by $5.4 billion (55%) and has more than doubled in the last nine years, growing over $8 billion, from $7.18 billion in 2015 to nearly $15.3 billion collected in 2024.

The results are in: Colorado property tax revenue in 2023 rose by the largest rate since 1975, over $2.4 billion. Property tax revenue has doubled over the last nine years.

Check out the full report: link in bio.
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DYK: Between April and May of 2024, prices in Denver increased by 0.59% outpacing national inflation which grew by 0.56%.

Read the full report: link in bio
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Wishing a very Happy Birthday to Cole Anderson, CSI`s amazing Research Analyst!

Have a fantastic day, Cole.
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NEW: Bill Kurtz, DSST’s founding CEO, and Van Schoales, Senior Director of Policy at the Keystone Policy Center discuss DSST services to nearly 7,400 students across eight middle schools and eight high schools. The seven middle schools within the Denver school district accounted for 13% of all Denver middle school students.

Click the link in our bio to listen.
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Happy Birthday to CSI`s COO, Cinamon Watson!

We hope your day is incredible, and we are so grateful for all you do.
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CSI’S MISSION

CSI’s mission is to examine the fiscal impacts of policies, initiatives, and proposed laws so that Coloradans are educated and informed on issues impacting their lives. Common Sense Institute was founded in 2010 originally as Common Sense Policy Roundtable. CSI’s founders were a concerned group of business and community leaders who observed that divisive partisanship was overwhelming policymaking and believed that sound economic analysis could help Coloradans make fact-based and common sense decisions.